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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100538 matches for " Mark W. Gilbertson "
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Learning to Obtain Reward, but Not Avoid Punishment, Is Affected by Presence of PTSD Symptoms in Male Veterans: Empirical Data and Computational Model
Catherine E. Myers, Ahmed A. Moustafa, Jony Sheynin, Kirsten M. VanMeenen, Mark W. Gilbertson, Scott P. Orr, Kevin D. Beck, Kevin C. H. Pang, Richard J. Servatius
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072508
Abstract: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms include behavioral avoidance which is acquired and tends to increase with time. This avoidance may represent a general learning bias; indeed, individuals with PTSD are often faster than controls on acquiring conditioned responses based on physiologically-aversive feedback. However, it is not clear whether this learning bias extends to cognitive feedback, or to learning from both reward and punishment. Here, male veterans with self-reported current, severe PTSD symptoms (PTSS group) or with few or no PTSD symptoms (control group) completed a probabilistic classification task that included both reward-based and punishment-based trials, where feedback could take the form of reward, punishment, or an ambiguous “no-feedback” outcome that could signal either successful avoidance of punishment or failure to obtain reward. The PTSS group outperformed the control group in total points obtained; the PTSS group specifically performed better than the control group on reward-based trials, with no difference on punishment-based trials. To better understand possible mechanisms underlying observed performance, we used a reinforcement learning model of the task, and applied maximum likelihood estimation techniques to derive estimated parameters describing individual participants’ behavior. Estimations of the reinforcement value of the no-feedback outcome were significantly greater in the control group than the PTSS group, suggesting that the control group was more likely to value this outcome as positively reinforcing (i.e., signaling successful avoidance of punishment). This is consistent with the control group’s generally poorer performance on reward trials, where reward feedback was to be obtained in preference to the no-feedback outcome. Differences in the interpretation of ambiguous feedback may contribute to the facilitated reinforcement learning often observed in PTSD patients, and may in turn provide new insight into how pathological behaviors are acquired and maintained in PTSD.
So Far-So Close: Remembering Clive Robbins: Invited Editorial
Simon Gilbertson
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2012,
Abstract:
The Silent Epidemic of Road Traffic Injury: What Can Music Therapists do About It?
Simon Gilbertson
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2008,
Abstract: Can music therapists do anything about road traffic injury and its effects? Road traffic crashes are responsible for up to 1.2 million deaths and up to 50 million injuries globally each year. One quarter of these injuries are traumatic brain injuries. In this paper, the literature related to music therapy and traumatic brain injury is reviewed. By analysing this literature, it becomes apparent that music therapists have provided for those injured almost to the exclusion of those affected by traumatic brain injury, the family, the community and the society. Using literature related to trauma, the author discusses ways in which music therapists may change the scope of music therapy in relation to caring for people affected by road traffic injury and considers the role music therapists may play in the prevention of road traffic injury in the future.
The Silent Epidemic of Road Traffic Injury: What Can Music Therapists do About It?
Simon Gilbertson
Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy , 2008,
Abstract: Can music therapists do anything about road traffic injury and its effects? Road traffic crashes are responsible for up to 1.2 million deaths and up to 50 million injuries globally each year. One quarter of these injuries are traumatic brain injuries. In this paper, the literature related to music therapy and traumatic brain injury is reviewed. By analysing this literature, it becomes apparent that music therapists have provided for those injured almost to the exclusion of those affected by traumatic brain injury, the family, the community and the society. Using literature related to trauma, the author discusses ways in which music therapists may change the scope of music therapy in relation to caring for people affected by road traffic injury and considers the role music therapists may play in the prevention of road traffic injury in the future.
Frequency and Energy Difference Detection of Dolphin Biosonar Signals Using a Decomposition Algorithm  [PDF]
Mark W. Muller
Open Journal of Acoustics (OJA) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/oja.2016.61001
Abstract: A set of dolphin echolocation signals previously collected from an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin in Kaneohe Bay, Hawai’i are decomposed using a matching pursuit algorithm to further investigate the role of four types of echolocation signals outlined elsewhere [1]. The method decomposes the echolocation signals into optimal linear expansions of waveforms, which are Gabor functions defined in a dictionary. The method allows for study of the changes in frequency content within a dolphin’s functional bandwidth during discrimination tasks. We investigate the role of the functional bandwidth in terms of the signal energy levels and echolocations task performance. Furthermore, ROC analysis is applied to the relative energies of the matched waveforms to determine probability of discrimination. The results suggest that dolphins may discriminate by inspection of the relevant frequency differences between targets. In addition, the results from the ROC analysis provides insight into the role of the different classes of dolphin signals and of the importance of modification of the outgoing echolocation clicks, which may be fundamental to a dolphin’s ability to identify and discriminate targets.
Resolution of Amenorrhea and Chronic Constipation in an Adult Patient with Idiopathic Scoliosis Wearing a Scoliosis Activity Suit for 6 Months: A Case Report  [PDF]
Mark W. Morningstar
Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (OJTR) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojtr.2018.62007
Abstract: Objective: To report the symptomatic and radiographic changes in an adult scoliosis patient with a history of amenorrhea and chronic constipation. Clinical Features: Patient presented for treatment with an 8-year history of amenorrhea and chronic constipation. Radiographic study showed a right thoracic/left lumbar double major scoliosis. Intervention and Outcome: Patient was fitted for a scoliosis activity suit and given instructions for continued home use, building up to 3 - 4 hours total daily. After 6 months of use, her amenorrhea and chronic constipation had resolved, and both scoliosis Cobb angles also improved. Scores on before and after SRS-22r questionnaires, as well as a quadruple numerical pain rating scale, also improved. Conclusion: A patient wearing a scoliosis activity suit for 6 months reported symptomatic changes as well as radiographic, pain, and quality of life improvements. The results of this case cannot be generalized. More investigation into the association of scoliosis and other organic symptoms is warranted.
A Novel Cross-Disciplinary Multi-Institute Approach to Translational Cancer Research: Lessons Learned from Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC)
Ashokkumar A. Patel,John R. Gilbertson,Louise C. Showe,Jack W. London
Cancer Informatics , 2007,
Abstract: Background: The Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance Bioinformatics Consortium (PCABC, http://www.pcabc.upmc.edu) is one of the first major project-based initiatives stemming from the Pennsylvania Cancer Alliance that was funded for four years by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The objective of this was to initiate a prototype biorepository and bioinformatics infrastructure with a robust data warehouse by developing a statewide data model (1) for bioinformatics and a repository of serum and tissue samples; (2) a data model for biomarker data storage; and (3) a public access website for disseminating research results and bioinformatics tools. The members of the Consortium cooperate closely, exploring the opportunity for sharing clinical, genomic and other bioinformatics data on patient samples in oncology, for the purpose of developing collaborative research programs across cancer research institutions in Pennsylvania. The Consortium’s intention was to establish a virtual repository of many clinical specimens residing in various centers across the state, in order to make them available for research. One of our primary goals was to facilitate the identification of cancer specific biomarkers and encourage collaborative research efforts among the participating centers.Methods: The PCABC has developed unique partnerships so that every region of the state can effectively contribute and participate. It includes over 80 individuals from 14 organizations, and plans to expand to partners outside the State. This has created a network of researchers, clinicians, bioinformaticians, cancer registrars, program directors, and executives from academic and community health systems, as well as external corporate partners - all working together to accomplish a common mission. The various sub-committees have developed a common IRB protocol template, common data elements for standardizing data collections for three organ sites, intellectual property/tech transfer agreements, and material transfer agreements that have been approved by each of the member institutions. This was the foundational work that has led to the development of a centralized data warehouse that has met each of the institutions’ IRB/HIPAA standards.Results: Currently, this “virtual biorepository” has over 58,000 annotated samples from 11,467 cancer patients available for research purposes. The clinical annotation of tissue samples is either done manually over the internet or semiautomated batch modes through mapping of local data elements with PCABC common data elements. The database c
Cyclosporine and Hepatitis C  [PDF]
Ryan Caballes, Mark W. Russo
Open Journal of Organ Transplant Surgery (OJOTS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojots.2012.24009
Abstract: End stage liver disease from hepatitis C is a leading indication for liver transplantation. Recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant may lead to cirrhosis and graft failure in up to 25% of recipients five years after liver transplantation. Anti-viral therapy is challenging after liver transplantation due to increased side effects including cytopenias and decreased efficacy compared to the nontransplant population. Tacrolimus and cyclosporine are the most common immunosuppressants used to prevent graft rejection. Tacrolimus is more potent than cyclosporine and may be preferred to cyclosporine. However, cyclosporine may have activity against hepatitis C and may have a theoretical advantage to tacrolimus in hepatitis liver transplant recipients. Cyclosporine may inhibit NS5B and NS5A protein complexes and increase endogenous interferon activity. Cyclophilin inhibitors without immunosuppressive properties are under development and represent a novel mechanisms for inhibiting HCV replication.
Assessing Watershed-Wildfire Risks on National Forest System Lands in the Rocky Mountain Region of the United States
Matthew P. Thompson,Joe Scott,Paul G. Langowski,Julie W. Gilbertson-Day,Jessica R. Haas,Elise M. Bowne
Water , 2013, DOI: 10.3390/w5030945
Abstract: Wildfires can cause significant negative impacts to water quality with resultant consequences for the environment and human health and safety, as well as incurring substantial rehabilitation and water treatment costs. In this paper we will illustrate how state-of-the-art wildfire simulation modeling and geospatial risk assessment methods can be brought to bear to identify and prioritize at-risk watersheds for risk mitigation treatments, in both pre-fire and post-fire planning contexts. Risk assessment results can be particularly useful for prioritizing management of hazardous fuels to lessen the severity and likely impacts of future wildfires, where budgetary and other constraints limit the amount of area that can be treated. Specifically we generate spatially resolved estimates of wildfire likelihood and intensity, and couple that information with spatial data on watershed location and watershed erosion potential to quantify watershed exposure and risk. For a case study location we focus on National Forest System lands in the Rocky Mountain Region of the United States. The Region houses numerous watersheds that are critically important to drinking water supplies and that have been impacted or threatened by large wildfires in recent years. Assessment results are the culmination of a broader multi-year science-management partnership intended to have direct bearing on wildfire management decision processes in the Region. Our results suggest substantial variation in the exposure of and likely effects to highly valued watersheds throughout the Region, which carry significant implications for prioritization. In particular we identified the San Juan National Forest as having the highest concentration of at-risk highly valued watersheds, as well as the greatest amount of risk that can be mitigated via hazardous fuel reduction treatments. To conclude we describe future opportunities and challenges for management of wildfire-watershed interactions.
High field magneto-transport in high mobility gated InSb/InAlSb quantum well heterostructures
A. M. Gilbertson,W. R. Branford,M. Fearn,L. Buckle,P. D. Buckle,T. Ashley,L. F. Cohen
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.79.235333
Abstract: We present high field magneto-transport data from a range of 30nm wide InSb/InAlSb quantum wells. The low temperature carrier mobility of the samples studied ranged from 18.4 to 39.5 m2V-1s-1 with carrier densities between 1.5x1015 and 3.28x1015 m-2. Room temperature mobilities are reported in excess of 6 m2V-1s-1. It is found that the Landau level broadening decreases with carrier density and beating patterns are observed in the magnetoresistance with non-zero node amplitudes in samples with the narrowest broadening despite the presence of a large g-factor. The beating is attributed to Rashba splitting phenomenon and Rashba coupling parameters are extracted from the difference in spin populations for a range of samples and gate biases. The influence of Landau level broadening and spin-dependent scattering rates on the observation of beating in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is investigated by simulations of the magnetoconductance. Data with non-zero beat node amplitudes are accompanied by asymmetric peaks in the Fourier transform, which are successfully reproduced by introducing a spin-dependent broadening in the simulations. It is found that the low-energy (majority) spin up state suffers more scattering than the high-energy (minority) spin down state and that the absence of beating patterns in the majority of (lower density) samples can be attributed to the same effect when the magnitude of the level broadening is large.
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