oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

4 ( 1 )

3 ( 1 )

2019 ( 86 )

2018 ( 140 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 71002 matches for " Maria Trojano "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /71002
Display every page Item
Review of interferon beta-1b in the treatment of early and relapsing multiple sclerosis
Damiano Paolicelli, Vita Direnzo, Maria Trojano
Biologics: Targets and Therapy , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/BTT.S4038
Abstract: f interferon beta-1b in the treatment of early and relapsing multiple sclerosis Review (5849) Total Article Views Authors: Damiano Paolicelli, Vita Direnzo, Maria Trojano Published Date July 2009 Volume 2009:3 Pages 369 - 376 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/BTT.S4038 Damiano Paolicelli, Vita Direnzo, Maria Trojano Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Bari, Bari, Italy Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune illness of the central nervous system. For many years the inflammatory manifestations of MS were treated using only corticosteroids. Since the 1990s the results of several clinical trials with immunomodulatory agents have changed the therapeutic approach to this disease. Interferon beta (IFNβ)-1b represents the pioneer of those therapies. There is growing evidence from clinical trials on relapsing-remitting MS and clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS that IFNβ-1b reduces the frequency and severity of relapses and the development of new and active brain lesions as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Long-term data suggest a persistent efficacy of IFNβ-1b on disease activity and a positive effect in slowing disability worsening. Furthermore a reduction of relapse rate and a slight positive effect on the progression were demonstrated when IFNβ-1b was administered to still-active secondary progressive MS. IFNβ-1b therapy is well tolerated and relatively free of long-term side effects. In spite of the emergence of new agents for the treatment of MS, IFNβ-1b still remains a first-line therapy with a fundamental role in all stages of the disease.
Review of interferon beta-1b in the treatment of early and relapsing multiple sclerosis
Damiano Paolicelli,Vita Direnzo,Maria Trojano
Biologics: Targets and Therapy , 2009,
Abstract: Damiano Paolicelli, Vita Direnzo, Maria TrojanoDepartment of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, University of Bari, Bari, ItalyAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune illness of the central nervous system. For many years the inflammatory manifestations of MS were treated using only corticosteroids. Since the 1990s the results of several clinical trials with immunomodulatory agents have changed the therapeutic approach to this disease. Interferon beta (IFNβ)-1b represents the pioneer of those therapies. There is growing evidence from clinical trials on relapsing-remitting MS and clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS that IFNβ-1b reduces the frequency and severity of relapses and the development of new and active brain lesions as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Long-term data suggest a persistent efficacy of IFNβ-1b on disease activity and a positive effect in slowing disability worsening. Furthermore a reduction of relapse rate and a slight positive effect on the progression were demonstrated when IFNβ-1b was administered to still-active secondary progressive MS. IFNβ-1b therapy is well tolerated and relatively free of long-term side effects. In spite of the emergence of new agents for the treatment of MS, IFNβ-1b still remains a first-line therapy with a fundamental role in all stages of the disease.Keywords: interferon beta-1b, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, clinically isolated syndromes, efficacy, safety, neutralizing antibodies
Ile587Val Polymorphism of the eIF2B5 Gene as Susceptibility Factor for Multiple Sclerosis  [PDF]
Carmine Ungaro, Francesca L. Conforti, Maria Trojano, Ida Manna, Virginia Andreoli, Francesca Condino, Paola Valentino, Antonio Gambardella, Aldo Quattrone, Rosalucia Mazzei
Neuroscience & Medicine (NM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/nm.2011.22017
Abstract: Mutations in the eIF2B gene cause the VWM disease. Genetic and biochemical data of MS patient and MRI data showing VWM images similar to MS lesions, encouraged the present study in which we analyzed the eIF2B5 gene in 225 unrelated MS patients to evaluate an overlapping between MS and VWM. A common variation Ile587Val was found very frequent in the MS patients respect normal controls, thus suggesting that Ile587Val should be considered as susceptibility factor in the development of MS. In conclusion, our data strongly highlight a possible involvement of the eIF2B5 in the development of MS.
Do frontal dysfunctions play a role in visual hallucinations in Alzheimer's disease as in Parkinson's disease?a comparative study
Grossi, Dario;Carotenuto, Anna;Trojano, Luigi;Manzo, Valentino;Fasanaro, Angiola Maria;
Psychology & Neuroscience , 2011, DOI: 10.3922/j.psns.2011.3.012
Abstract: recent studies have demonstrated that nondemented patients with parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations had lower scores on frontal-executive tasks than parkinsonian patients without hallucinations, most likely due to defective cholinergic circuitry. the aim of the present study is to investigate whether development of visual hallucinations in patients with alzheimer's disease may also be related to more severe frontal dysfunctions. in the present study, 36 patients were included who were affected by probable alzheimer's disease (18 with visual hallucinations and 18 without) and 38 patients affected by idiopathic parkinson's disease (19 with visual hallucinations and 19 without). patients completed a neuropsychological test battery and a short questionnaire to collect information about hallucination types and features. multivariate analysis showed that patients with alzheimer's disease scored significantly lower than patients with parkinson's disease and that patients with hallucinations scored significantly lower than patients without hallucinations. within both the alzheimer's disease group and the parkinson's disease group, patients with visual hallucinations scored significantly lower than patients without visual hallucinations, particularly on tests evaluating frontal-executive functions. these results demonstrate that patients with visual hallucinations show a significant impairment on tests tapping frontal-executive functions in alzheimer's disease, as previously demonstrated (and verified here) in parkinson's disease. on this basis it seems likely that analogous cognitive mechanisms underlie development of visual hallucinations in both degenerative diseases. moreover, we may speculate that a defective circuitry of the prefrontal cortex is crucial for the genesis of hallucinations.
Aquaporin-4 Autoantibodies in Neuromyelitis Optica: AQP4 Isoform-Dependent Sensitivity and Specificity
Francesco Pisani, Angelo Sparaneo, Carla Tortorella, Maddalena Ruggieri, Maria Trojano, Maria Grazia Mola, Grazia Paola Nicchia, Antonio Frigeri, Maria Svelto
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079185
Abstract: Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease, characterized by the presence of autoantibody (NMO-IgG) to Aquaporin-4 (AQP4). NMO-IgG identification supports NMO diagnosis and several diagnostic tests have been developed, but their sensitivity is too variable, and some assay show low sensitivity. This impairs correct diagnosis of NMO. By cell based assay (CBA) we here evaluate the efficacy of different strategies to express AQP4 in mammalian cells in terms of: a) AQP4 translation initiation signals; b) AQP4 isoforms (M1 and M23) and fluorescent tag position; c) NMO serum concentration and AQP4 degradation. Our results demonstrate that when using AQP4-M1, the nucleotide in position ?3 of the AUG greatly affects the AQP4-M1/M23 protein ratio, NMO-IgG binding, and consequently test sensitivity. Test sensitivity was highest with M23 expressing cells (97.5%) and only 27.5% with AQP4-M1. The fluorescent tag added to the N-terminus of AQP4-M23 considerably affected the NMO-IgG binding, and test sensitivity, due to disruption of AQP4 suprastructures. Furthermore, sera used at high concentration resulted in AQP4 degradation which affected test sensitivity. To further evaluate the reliability of the M23 based CBA test, samples of one NMO patient collected during about 2 years clinical follow-up were tested. The results of serum titer correlated with disease activity and treatment response. In conclusion, we provide a molecular explanation for the contrasting CBA test data reported and suggest the use of M23 with a C-terminus fluorescent tag as the proper test for NMO diagnosis.
Low Serum Urate Levels Are Associated to Female Gender in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
Stefano Zoccolella, Carla Tortorella, Pietro Iaffaldano, Vita Direnzo, Mariangela D’Onghia, Elena Luciannatelli, Damiano Paolicelli, Paolo Livrea, Maria Trojano
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040608
Abstract: Background Urate is a natural antioxidant and may prevent CNS tissue damage and the clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune encephalitis. Results from clinical studies are conflicting and the contribution of urate to the pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) remains uncertain. Objective To evaluate serum urate levels in MS patients and their relationships with clinical, demographic and MRI variables. Methods Levels of non-fasting serum uric acid and creatinine were determined by an automated enzymatic assay and glomerular filtration rate was assessed in 245 MS patients, in 252 age/sex-matched neurological controls (NC) and in 59 Healthy controls (HC). Results Median serum urate levels did not differ between MS patients (3.8 mg/dL), HC (4.0 mg/dl) and NC (4.0 mg/dL). Serum urate levels were lower in females than in males in all groups (p = <0.0001). In female-MS, serum urate levels (3.2 mg/dL) were lower compared to those in female HC (3.8; p = 0.01) and NC (3.5 mg/dL; p = 0.02), whereas in male-MS they(4.8 mg/dL) did not differ from those in male HC (4.5 mg/dl) and NC (4.8 mg/dL). Urate concentrations trended to be lower in Clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS (3.7 mg/dL) and in relapsing MS (3.7 mg/dL), compared to patients with progressive MS (4.4 mg/dL; p = 0.06), and in patients with an annual relapse rate (ARR) >2 (3.3 mg/dL) than in those with an ARR ≤2: 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.05). Significant lower serum urate levels were found in females than in males in all clinical MS subtypes (p<0.01), separately evaluated. Female sex (beta: ?0.53; p<0.00001) was the most significant determinant of serum urate concentrations in MS patients on multivariate regression analysis. Conclusions Our findings suggest that low urate levels could be of significance in predominantly inflammatory phases of MS even at the early stage and mainly in females.
Changes in magnetic resonance imaging disease measures over 3 years in mildly disabled patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis receiving interferon β-1a in the COGnitive Impairment in MUltiple Sclerosis (COGIMUS) study
Stefano Bastianello, Elisabetta Giugni, Maria Amato, Maria-Rosalia Tola, Maria Trojano, Stefano Galletti, Giacomo Luccichenti, Mario Quarantelli, Orietta Picconi, Francesco Patti, the COGIMUS study group
BMC Neurology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2377-11-125
Abstract: In this observational study, patients (n = 550; 18-50 years; relapsing-remitting MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤4.0]) receiving interferon (IFN) β-1a therapy (44 or 22 μg subcutaneously [sc] three times weekly [tiw]) underwent standardized MRI, neuropsychological and quality-of-life (QoL) assessments over 3 years. In this post hoc analysis, MRI outcomes and correlations between MRI parameters and clinical and functional outcomes were analysed.MRI data over 3 years were available for 164 patients. T2 lesion and T1 gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesion volumes, but not black hole (BH) volumes, decreased significantly from baseline to Year 3 (P < 0.0001). Percentage decreases (baseline to Year 3) were greater with the 44 μg dose than with the 22 μg dose for T2 lesion volume (-10.2% vs -4.5%, P = 0.025) and T1 BH volumes (-7.8% vs +10.3%, P = 0.002). A decrease in T2 lesion volume over 3 years predicted stable QoL over the same time period. Treatment with IFN β-1a, 44 μg sc tiw, predicted an absence of cognitive impairment at Year 3.Subcutaneous IFN β-1a significantly decreased MRI measures of disease, with a significant benefit shown for the 44 μg over the 22 μg dose; higher-dose treatment also predicted better cognitive outcomes over 3 years.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide valuable information on the type, extent and location of pathological lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Increasingly, MRI is routinely used in the diagnosis and monitoring of MS, being integral to the McDonald criteria [1]. In addition, MRI measures have been widely used as secondary [2-5] and, more recently, primary [6] outcome measures in large clinical trials of new MS therapies. In the pivotal PRISMS (Prevention of Relapses and disability by Interferon-β-1a Subcutaneously in Multiple Sclerosis) study, subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) β-1a, 44 or 22 μg three times weekly (tiw), significantly reduced relapse-related outcomes in patients with relapsing-remitt
Subcutaneous Interferon β-1a May Protect against Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Relapsing–Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: 5-Year Follow-up of the COGIMUS Study
Francesco Patti, Vincenzo Brescia Morra, Maria Pia Amato, Maria Trojano, Stefano Bastianello, Maria Rosalia Tola, Salvatore Cottone, Andrea Plant, Orietta Picconi, COGIMUS Study Group
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074111
Abstract: Objective To assess the effects of subcutaneous (sc) interferon (IFN) -1a on cognition over 5 years in mildly disabled patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods Patients aged 18–50 years with RRMS (Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≤4.0) who had completed the 3-year COGIMUS study underwent standardized magnetic resonance imaging, neurological examination, and neuropsychological testing at years 4 and 5. Predictors of cognitive impairment at year 5 were identified using multivariate analysis. Results Of 331 patients who completed the 3-year COGIMUS study, 265 participated in the 2-year extension study, 201 of whom (75.8%; sc IFN β-1a three times weekly: 44 μg, n = 108; 22 μg, n = 93) completed 5 years' follow-up. The proportion of patients with cognitive impairment in the study population overall remained stable between baseline (18.0%) and year 5 (22.6%). The proportion of patients with cognitive impairment also remained stable in both treatment groups between baseline and year 5, and between year 3 and year 5. However, a significantly higher proportion of men than women had cognitive impairment at year 5 (26.5% vs 14.4%, p = 0.046). Treatment with the 22 versus 44 μg dose was predictive of cognitive impairment at year 5 (hazard ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval 0.48–0.97). Conclusions This study suggests that sc IFN β-1a dose-dependently stabilizes or delays cognitive impairment over a 5-year period in most patients with mild RRMS. Women seem to be more protected against developing cognitive impairment, which may indicate greater response to therapy or the inherently better prognosis associated with female sex in MS.
Impact of Natalizumab on Cognitive Performances and Fatigue in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective, Open-Label, Two Years Observational Study
Pietro Iaffaldano, Rosa Gemma Viterbo, Damiano Paolicelli, Guglielmo Lucchese, Emilio Portaccio, Benedetta Goretti, Vita Direnzo, Mariangela D'Onghia, Stefano Zoccolella, Maria Pia Amato, Maria Trojano
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035843
Abstract: Background and Objectives Natalizumab reduces the relapse rate and magnetic resonance imaging activity in patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS). So far the influence of natalizumab on cognitive functions and fatigue in MS remains uncertain. The aim of this prospective, open-label, observational study was to evaluate the possible effects of natalizumab on cognition and fatigue measures in RRMS patients treated for up to two years. Methods Cognitive performances were examined by the Rao's Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB), the Stroop test (ST) and the Cognitive Impairment Index (CII), every 12 months. Patients who failed in at least 3 tests of the BRB and the ST were classified as cognitively impaired (CI). Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) was administered every 12 months to assess patient's self-reported fatigue. One hundred and 53 patients completed 1 and 2 year-natalizumab treatment, respectively. Results After 1 year of treatment the percentage of CI patients decreased from 29% (29/100) at baseline to 19% (19/100) (p = 0.031) and the mean baseline values of CII (13.52±6.85) and FSS (4.01±1.63) scores were significantly reduced (10.48±7.12, p<0.0001 and 3.61±1.56, p = 0.008). These significant effects were confirmed in the subgroup of patients treated up to two years. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a short-term NTZ treatment may significantly improve cognitive performances and fatigue in RRMS patients.
Do frontal dysfunctions play a role in visual hallucinations in Alzheimer’s disease as in Parkinson’s disease? A comparative study
Dario Grossi,Anna Carotenuto,Luigi Trojano,Valentino Manzo
Psychology & Neuroscience , 2011,
Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that nondemented patients with Parkinson’s disease with visual hallucinations had lower scores on frontal-executive tasks than parkinsonian patients without hallucinations, most likely due to defective cholinergic circuitry. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether development of visual hallucinations in patients with Alzheimer’s disease may also be related to more severe frontal dysfunctions. In the present study, 36 patients were included who were affected by probable Alzheimer’s disease (18 with visual hallucinations and 18 without) and 38 patients affected by idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (19 with visual hallucinations and 19 without). Patients completed a neuropsychological test battery and a short questionnaire to collect information about hallucination types and features. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with Alzheimer’s disease scored significantly lower than patients with Parkinson’s disease and that patients with hallucinations scored significantly lower than patients without hallucinations. Within both the Alzheimer’s disease group and the Parkinson’s disease group, patients with visual hallucinations scored significantly lower than patients without visual hallucinations, particularly on tests evaluating frontalexecutive functions. These results demonstrate that patients with visual hallucinations show a significant impairment on tests tapping frontal-executive functions in Alzheimer’s disease, as previously demonstrated (and verified here) in Parkinson’s disease. On this basis it seems likely that analogous cognitive mechanisms underlie development of visual hallucinations in both degenerative diseases. Moreover, we may speculate that a defective circuitry of the prefrontal cortex is crucial for the genesis of hallucinations.
Page 1 /71002
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.