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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 36218 matches for " Mari?lle CW van Hulten "
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In silico identification of putative promoter motifs of White Spot Syndrome Virus
Hendrik Marks, Xin-Ying Ren, Hans Sandbrink, Marille CW van Hulten, Just M Vlak
BMC Bioinformatics , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2105-7-309
Abstract: The collective information shows that the upstream region of early WSSV genes, containing a TATA box and an initiator, is similar to Drosophila RNA polymerase II core promoter sequences, suggesting utilization of the cellular transcription machinery for generating early transcripts. The alignment of the 5' ends of known well-established late genes, including all major structural protein genes, identified a degenerate motif (ATNAC) which could be involved in WSSV late transcription. For these genes, only one contained a functional TATA box. However, almost half of the WSSV late genes, as previously assigned by microarray analysis, did contain a TATA box in their upstream region.The data may suggest the presence of two separate classes of late WSSV genes, one exploiting the cellular RNA polymerase II system for mRNA synthesis and the other generating messengers by a new virus-induced transcription mechanism.White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), type species of the virus family Nimaviridae (genus whispovirus), is a pathogen of major economic importance in cultured penaeid shrimp [1,2]. Histopathological studies on WSSV infected shrimp have shown that the virus mainly infects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin, such as the stomach, gills, heart, gut, muscle tissue and hematopoietic tissue [3-5]. Infected cells within these tissues are characterized by the appearance of homogeneous hypertrophied nuclei and chromatin margination [1,5,6]. WSSV particles have been mainly detected in the nuclei of infected cells, indicating that transcription, replication and virion assembly probably occur in the nucleus [5-8]. It is not clear how the virions are released from the nucleus of an infected cell, but this most likely occurs by budding or by rupture of the nuclear envelope and/or the cell membrane.The circular ds DNA genome of three WSSV isolates, originating from Taiwan (WSSV-TW), China (WSSV-CN) and Thailand (WSSV-TH), have been completely sequenced [9-11]. The genome of W
Transient early preeclampsia in twin pregnancy with a triploid fetus: a case report
Clasien van der Houwen, Tineke Schukken, Marille van Pampus
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-3-7311
Abstract: A 33-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy. One fetus showed early growth restriction resulting in fetal death at 20 weeks. The placenta was enlarged with some cysts. Chorionic villus biopsy confirmed triploidy. At 21 weeks, the patient developed preeclampsia with a blood pressure of 154/98 mmHg and proteinuria (24 hour protein excretion of 2.5 g/L), for which she was hospitalized. Without pharmacological interventions, the blood pressure normalized and proteinuria disappeared. At 35 weeks, she again developed preeclampsia. A cesarean section was performed at 38 weeks and a healthy child was born.Survival of the healthy fetus is possible in a twin pregnancy with a triploid fetus complicated by early preeclampsia. The pregnancy should not be terminated if the triploid twin has died and as long as conservative management is safe.Triploidy is a genetic disorder with an extra haploid set of chromosomes resulting in a total of 69 chromosomes. Two types of triploidy can be distinguished according to the parental origin [1]. Type I, with the additional chromosome set being of paternal origin (diandric), is consistent with normal growth of the fetus, with increased nuchal translucency, and an enlarged and partially multicystic placenta with elevated levels of maternal serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). Partial molar gestations are usually associated with triploidy of diandric origin.Type II, with the additional chromosome set being of maternal origin (digynic), is characterized by a small but normal placenta with decreased levels of β-hCG and asymmetrical fetal growth restriction. Common structural defects in both types are malformed hands, head, heart and face [2].Triploid pregnancies rarely advance into the second trimester, but if they do, a high risk of early onset severe preeclampsia is noticed as a result of the molar tissue of type I triploidy. In a series of 17 triploid pregnancies, six cases (35%) developed ea
Confluence Reduction for Probabilistic Systems (extended version)
Mark Timmer,Marille Stoelinga,Jaco van de Pol
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: This paper presents a novel technique for state space reduction of probabilistic specifications, based on a newly developed notion of confluence for probabilistic automata. We prove that this reduction preserves branching probabilistic bisimulation and can be applied on-the-fly. To support the technique, we introduce a method for detecting confluent transitions in the context of a probabilistic process algebra with data, facilitated by an earlier defined linear format. A case study demonstrates that significant reductions can be obtained.
Tissue micro array analysis of ganglioside N-glycolyl GM3 expression and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activation in relation to dendritic cell infiltration and microvessel density in non-small cell lung cancer
Hester van Cruijsen, Marille Ruiz, Paul van der Valk, Tanja D de Gruijl, Giuseppe Giaccone
BMC Cancer , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-180
Abstract: Immunohistochemistry was performed on a tissue array to determine N-glycolyl GM3 (GM3) and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) expression in 176 primary NSCLC resections. Median values of GM3 and pSTAT3 expression were used as cut off. Microvessel density (MVD) was determined by CD34 staining and morphology. CD1a and CD83 were used to determine infiltrating immature and mature dendritic cells, respectively.94% and 71% of the NSCLC samples expressed GM3 and nuclear pSTAT3, respectively. Median overall survival was 40.0 months. Both low GM3 expression and high pSTAT3 expression were associated with a worse survival, which reached near significance for GM3 (P = 0.08). Microvessel density (MVD), determined by CD34 staining and morphology, was lower in NSCLC samples with high GM3 expression. CD1a+ cells (immature DCs) were more frequent in NSCLC tissues as compared to peritumoral lung tissue, while CD83+ cells (mature DCs) were more frequent in peritumoral lung tissue. CD83+ DCs were less frequent in NSCLC tissues with high GM3 expression.GM3 and pSTAT3 are widely expressed in NSCLC. Based on CD83 expression, GM3, but not pSTAT3, appeared to be involved in tumor-induced DC suppression. pSTAT3 expression was not associated with MVD, while GM3 might play an anti-angiogenic role.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), consisting mainly of adenocarcinoma, squamous cell and large-cell carcinoma, accounts for almost 80% of lung cancer cases. Five-year survival rate for NSCLC patients, irrespective of histological subtype and stage at diagnosis, approximates 15% [1]. Of the 25% who are candidates for curative surgery at diagnosis (stage I-IIIA), 65% will relapse within two years. Most patients present with advanced disease, and despite recent improvements in systemic combination regimens, advanced NSCLC patients still have a poor prognosis [2].To design new and effective therapies in order to improve the outcome for NSC
Sports participation, perceived neighborhood safety, and individual cognitions: how do they interact?
Marille A Beenackers, Carlijn BM Kamphuis, Alex Burdorf, Johan P Mackenbach, Frank J van Lenthe
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-8-76
Abstract: Cross-sectional data were obtained from residents (age 25-75) of 87 neighborhoods in the city of Eindhoven, who participated in the Dutch GLOBE study in 2004 (N = 2474). We used multilevel logistic regression to analyze the interactions between perceived neighborhood safety and individual cognitions (attitude, self-efficacy, social influence, and intention) on sports participation (yes/no).In its association with sports participation, perceived neighborhood safety interacted significantly with self-efficacy and attitude (p < 0.05). Among persons who perceived their neighborhood as safe, a positive attitude was strongly associated with sports participation (OR = 2.00, 95%CI = 1.48-2.71). In contrast, attitude was not associated with sports participation in persons who perceived their neighborhood as unsafe (OR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.34-1.24). Further, self-efficacy was significantly stronger associated with sports participation in persons who perceived their neighborhood as unsafe (OR = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.31-2.60) than in those who perceived their neighborhood as safe (OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.05-1.36). Social influence and intention did not interact with perceived neighborhood safety.Associations between individual cognitions and sports participation depend on neighborhood circumstances, such as perceived neighborhood safety. Interventions to promote sports participation in adults should take the interaction between environmental and individual characteristics into account. More research is needed to find out the causal pathways in individual-environment interactions.Regular physical activity (PA) prevents major chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, mental illness, obesity, and various types of cancer [1,2]. Although the health benefits of regular exercise and a physically active lifestyle are well known, many people are still not active. In the Dutch population, over 40% does not meet the national recommendation of being moderately active for at least half
Action planning as predictor of health protective and health risk behavior: an investigation of fruit and snack consumption
Liesbeth van Osch, Marille Beenackers, Astrid Reubsaet, Lilian Lechner, Math Candel, Hein de Vries
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-6-69
Abstract: Two longitudinal observational studies were performed simultaneously, one focusing on fruit consumption (N = 572) and one on high-caloric snack consumption (N = 585) in Dutch adults. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate and compare the predictive value of action planning in both behaviors, correcting for demographics and the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The nature of the influence of action planning was investigated by testing mediating and moderating effects.Action planning was a significant predictor of fruit consumption and restricted snack consumption beyond the influence of motivational factors and past behavior. The strength of the predictive value of action planning did not differ between the two behaviors. Evidence for mediation of the intention - behavior relationship was found for both behaviors. Positive moderating effects of action planning were demonstrated for fruit consumption, indicating that individuals who report high levels of action planning are significantly more likely to translate their intentions into actual behavior.The results indicate that the planning of specific preparatory actions predicts the performance of healthy dietary behavior and support the application of self-regulatory planning in both health protective and health risk behaviors. Future interventions in dietary modification may turn these findings to advantage by incorporating one common planning protocol to increase the likelihood that good intentions are translated into healthy dietary behavior.Achieving and maintaining a healthy diet is all about consuming adequate amounts of wholesome nutrition and restricting the consumption of unhealthy, high-caloric foods. If only motivation would be enough for people to eat healthily, we would not be faced with the alarming figures on overweight and obesity. In the Netherlands, high levels of motivation (e.g., 85% of non-obese adults have a positive intention to prevent weight gain, [1]) sharply
Sports participation, perceived neighborhood safety, and individual cognitions: how do they interact?
Marille A Beenackers, Carlijn BM Kamphuis, Alex Burdorf, Johan P Mackenbach, Frank J van Lenthe
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-8-114
Abstract: After publication of this work [1] it was realized that formula 3 and formula 4 in the Statistical Analysis section of the Methods were incorrectly listed. Since the formulas were correctly used in the analysis, this correction does not affect the results or conclusions of the paper. The formulas should be:So, to obtain the coefficient of the individual cognition (X) for the second category of perceived neighborhood safety (Zmedium), the coefficient of X (β1) should be added to the coefficient of the interaction term XZmedium (β6) (equation 3). Because of the logarithmic scale, the odds ratio of an interaction term can be interpreted as a multiplicative factor. To obtain the odds ratio of the individual cognition (X) for the second category of perceived neighborhood safety (Zmedium), the odds ratio of X (EXPβ1) should be multiplied by to the odds ratio of the interaction term XZmedium (EXPβ6).To obtain the coefficient of the individual cognition (X) for the last category of perceived neighborhood safety (Zlow), the coefficient of X (β1) should be added to the coefficient of the interaction term XZlow (β7) (equation 4). Again, to obtain the odds ratio of the individual cognition (X) for the last category of perceived neighborhood safety (Zlow), the odds ratio of X (EXPβ1) should be multiplied by to the odds ratio of the interaction term XZlow (EXPβ7).We regret any inconvenience that this may have caused.
Cervical Pessaries for the Prevention of Preterm Birth: A Systematic Review
Sophie M. S. Liem,Marille G. van Pampus,Ben Willem J. Mol,Dick J. Bekedam
Obstetrics and Gynecology International , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/576723
Abstract:
Cervical Pessaries for the Prevention of Preterm Birth: A Systematic Review
Sophie M. S. Liem,Marille G. van Pampus,Ben Willem J. Mol,Dick J. Bekedam
Obstetrics and Gynecology International , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/576723
Abstract: Introduction. Reduction of preterm birth is a major goal in obstetric care. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and cohort studies on the effectiveness of the cervical pessary to prevent preterm birth. Methods. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE and Embase from inception until April 2012 to identify studies investigating treatment with a cervical pessary to prevent preterm birth. We constructed two-by-two tables for delivery before 28, 34, and 37 weeks of gestation and calculated relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals. Results. The search revealed 103 potentially eligible abstracts of which six cohort studies and four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigated the effectiveness of the pessary. One RCT ( ) demonstrated a lower delivery rate prior to 34 weeks (RR 0.24; 95% CI 0.13–0.43) in the pessary group, while another RCT ( ) showed no positive effect of pessary for delivery before 34 weeks (RR 1.73; 95% CI 0.43–6.88). Two older quasi randomized studies and cohort studies indicated potential effect of the pessary. Conclusions. Available randomized and nonrandomized studies indicate potential effectiveness of a cervical pessary in the prevention of preterm birth. More randomized clinical trials are needed before this device can be used in clinical practice. 1. Introduction Preterm birth (PTB) is the most common cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality; therefore, preventing PTB is one of the most important targets in the current obstetric care. Mechanical prevention of preterm birth was proposed six decades ago by the use of the Shirodkar and McDonald cerclage [1, 2]. The effectiveness of these interventions has been assessed in two Cochrane reviews. The first Cochrane review among women with risk factors for preterm delivery or a history of miscarriages pooled the result of four studies ( ) and showed no significant reduction in PTB <37 weeks when using a cerclage (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.76–1.03). Three studies ( ) reporting on delivery before 32 weeks of gestation were pooled and none showed a reduction in preterm birth <32 weeks due to the cerclage (RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.67–2.49) [3]. The second Cochrane review on cervical cerclage among women with a singleton pregnancy at high risk of PTB based on their history (e.g., previous PTB, cervical surgery, short CL on ultrasound, or detected cervical changes) showed a significant reduction in PTB before 37 weeks of gestation ( , RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69–0.95) and before 34 weeks of gestation ( , RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68–0.93) [4]. In both reviews, cervical
Prediction of persistent shoulder pain in general practice: Comparing clinical consensus from a Delphi procedure with a statistical scoring system
David Vergouw, Martijn W Heymans, Henrica CW de Vet, Dani?lle AWM van der Windt, Henri?tte E van der Horst
BMC Family Practice , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2296-12-63
Abstract: A Delphi poll involving 3 rounds of data collection was used to reach consensus among health care professionals involved in the assessment and management of shoulder pain.Predictors selected by the expert panel were: symptom duration, pain catastrophizing, symptom history, fear-avoidance beliefs, coexisting neck pain, severity of shoulder disability, multisite pain, age, shoulder pain intensity and illness perceptions. When tested in a sample of 587 primary care patients consulting with shoulder pain the predictive performance of the two prognostic models based on clinical expertise were lower compared to that of a statistically derived model (Area Under the Curve, AUC, expert-based dichotomous predictors 0.656, expert-based continuous predictors 0.679 vs. 0.702 statistical model).The three models were different in terms of composition, but all confirmed the prognostic importance of symptom duration, baseline level of shoulder disability and multisite pain. External validation in other populations of shoulder pain patients should confirm whether statistically derived models indeed perform better compared to models based on clinical expertise.A clinical prediction rule is a simple tool which uses a combination of early signs or symptoms to provide a quantitative estimate of the absolute risk of particular outcomes for individual patients. Often the outcome is the individuals' expected course of an illness (prognosis), however clinical prediction rules can also be developed for predicting presence of a disease (diagnosis) or for predicting an individuals' response to a particular intervention[1]. The obtained estimations may subsequently be used by clinicians for the provision of patient information or to support decisions regarding treatment and referral.Before a prediction rule can be implemented in clinical practice it ideally needs to be developed, validated and analysed for impact[1]. In prognostic research, prediction rules are generally derived by logistic or C
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