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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 349 matches for " MPH "
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Starting School Healthy and Ready to Learn: Using Social Indicators to Improve School Readiness in Los Angeles County
Cheryl Wold, MPH,Will Nicholas, PhD, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2007,
Abstract: BackgroundSchool readiness is an important public health outcome, determined by a set of interdependent health and developmental trajectories and influenced by a child’s family, school, and community environments. The same factors that influence school readiness also influence educational success and health throughout life.ContextA California cigarette tax ballot initiative (Proposition 10) created new resources for children aged 0 to 5 years and their families statewide through county-level First 5 commissions, including First 5 LA in Los Angeles County. An opportunity to define and promote school readiness indicators was facilitated by collaborative relationships with a strong emphasis on data among First 5 LA, the Children’s Planning Council, and the Los Angeles County Public Health Department, and other child-serving organizations. MethodsA workgroup developed school readiness goals and indicators based on recommendations of the National Education Goals Panel and five key domains of child well-being: 1) good health, 2) safety and survival, 3) economic well-being, 4) social and emotional well-being, and 5) education/workforce readiness.ConsequencesThe Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and First 5 LA Commission adopted the school readiness indicators. First 5 LA incorporated the indicators into the results-based accountability framework for its strategic plan and developed a community-oriented report designed to educate and spur school readiness-oriented action. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a countywide consensus-building plan designed to engage key stakeholders in the use of the indicators for planning, evaluation, and community-building activities.InterpretationSchool readiness indicators in Los Angeles County represent an important step forward for public health practice, namely, the successful blending of an expanded role for assessment with the ecological model.
Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011
Nelcy Martínez,MPH;
MEDICC Review , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S1555-79602012000300003
Abstract: introduction: health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. such studies are rather uncommon in cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. objective: assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in havana. methods: the study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. results: of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. at baseline, 75% of cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. conclusions: a systema
Developing nursing capacity for health systems and services research in Cuba, 2008-2011
MPH Nelcy Martínez
MEDICC Review , 2012,
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Health systems and services research by nursing personnel could inform decisionmaking and nursing care, providing evidence concerning quality of and patient satisfaction. Such studies are rather uncommon in Cuban research institutes, where clinical research predominates. OBJECTIVE: Assess the results of a strategy implemented between 2008 and 2011 to develop nursing capacity for health systems and services research in 14 national research institutes based in Havana. METHODS: The study comprised four stages: description of approaches to health systems and services research by nurses worldwide and in Cuba; analysis of current capacities for such research in Cuba; intervention design and implementation; and evaluation. Various techniques were used including: literature review, bibliometric analysis, questionnaire survey, consultation with experts, focus groups, and workshops for participant orientation and design and followup of research projects. Qualitative information reduction and quantitative information summary methods were used. Initially, 32 nursing managers participated; a further 105 nurses from the institutes were involved in research teams formed during intervention implementation. RESULTS: Of all published nursing research articles retrieved, 8.9% (185 of 2081) concerned health systems and services research, of which 26.5% (49 of 185) dealt with quality assessment. At baseline, 75% of Cuban nurses surveyed had poor knowledge of health systems and services research. Orientation, design and followup workshops for all institute teams developed individual and institutional capacity for health systems and services research. Post-intervention, 84.7% (27) of nurses reached good knowledge and 14.3% (5) fair; institutional research teams were formed and maintained in 9 institutes, and 13 projects designed and implemented (11 institutional, 2 addressing ministerial-level priorities) to research nursing issues at selected centers. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic strategy to build nursing capacity for health systems and services research can be effective in involving nurses in such research and in developing institutional support for it, fostering compliance with Cuban and international professional development priorities for nursing, as well as contributing to quality of patient services.
Data Needs and Uses for Older Adult Health Surveillance: Perspectives From State Health Agencies
Christopher Maylahn, MPH,Sam Alongi, MBA, MPH,Jeanne Alongi, MPH,Margaret J. Moore, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2005,
Abstract: As the population of older adults in the United States increases, state public health agencies are confronted with new opportunities and challenges (1). These agencies recognize the need to form new partnerships and develop effective and innovative approaches for addressing the needs of older adults (2). Public health initiatives to promote healthy aging and reduce the burden of chronic conditions are currently underway and include partnership efforts by public health organizations and aging services agencies to implement evidence-based health promotion programs, disseminate information about aging issues, and strengthen their ability to expand these efforts (3). To ensure that informed decisions are being made and to measure progress toward health goals related to older adults, state health agencies interpret and disseminate data on the health of older adults (4). These agencies rely on surveillance — the continuous, systematic collection and analysis of health data — a core tool of public health practice (5). However, previous work to develop indicators that measure whether a community promotes health and well-being among older adults (6) and to create a picture of older adult health has not focused on public health issues (7) or included state-level data (8). Similarly, the development of indicators for chronic diseases (9,10) has not focused on older adults. To fully understand the breadth and depth of older adult health from a public health perspective, these efforts must be combined to produce a core set of public-health–related indicators to measure older adult health at the state level.
Establishing Worksite Wellness Programs for North Carolina Government Employees, 2008
Suzanna Young, MPH,Jacquie Halladay, MD, MPH,Marcus Plescia, MD, MPH,Casey Herget, MSW, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2011,
Abstract: BackgroundState employee health plans sometimes provide worksite wellness programs to reduce the prevalence of chronic diseases among their members, but few offer the comprehensive range of interventions recommended by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.Community ContextNorth Carolina’s State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees provides health coverage for approximately 665,000 state employees, teachers, retirees, and dependents. Health claims indicate that the prevalence of having at least 1 chronic disease or of being obese is approximately 32% among state employees.MethodsThe State Health Plan created a partnership with North Carolina’s Division of Public Health, Office of State Personnel, and other key state agencies to identify bureaucratic obstacles to providing worksite wellness programs for state employees and to develop a state policy to address them. The Division of Public Health established a model worksite program to guide development of the worksite wellness policy and pilot wellness interventions.OutcomeThe state’s first worksite wellness policy created an employee wellness infrastructure in state government and addressed administrative barriers to allow effective worksite wellness interventions. For example, the policy led to pilot implementation of a subsidized worksite weight management program. Positive results of the program helped generate legislative support to expand the weight management program throughout state government.InterpretationStrong interagency partnership is essential to guide worksite wellness policy and program development in state government. State health plans, public health agencies, and personnel agencies each play a role in that partnership.
Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Comorbid Conditions Among U.S. and Kentucky Adults, 2000 2002
Todd M. Jenkins, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2005,
Abstract: Introduction Obesity rates for adults in Kentucky are regularly among the highest in the nation. Since 1991, adult obesity in Kentucky and the United States has nearly doubled. This trend is of great concern because excess weight has been associated with several chronic diseases and conditions. This paper reports on the prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults in Kentucky between 2000 and 2002. The estimates produced by this study will provide baseline figures for developing Kentucky s statewide obesity action plan. Methods A secondary data analysis was performed using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Prevalence estimates and odds ratios were calculated for the United States and Kentucky. Results In Kentucky, 24.2% of adults were obese, compared with 21.9% nationally (P < .001). There were also significantly more overweight adults in Kentucky than there were nationwide (P < .001). Logistic regression showed that overweight and obese adults were more likely to report various comorbid conditions. Conclusion Overweight and obesity estimates in Kentucky were significantly higher than nationwide figures. However, overweight/obese adults in Kentucky were no more likely than their U.S. counterparts to report selected
Reproductive Health Surveillance in the US-Mexico Border Region: Beyond the Border (and Into the Future)
Milton Kotelchuck, PhD, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2008,
Abstract:
Obesity, Health Disparities, and Prevention Paradigms: Hard Questions and Hard Choices
Shiriki Kumanyika, PhD, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2005,
Abstract:
Do We Have Real Poverty in the United States of America?
Paula Braveman, MD, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2007,
Abstract:
Revisiting the Social Contract: Physicians as Community Health Promoters
Margaret Gadon, MD, MPH
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2007,
Abstract:
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