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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 59148 matches for " Lynda Yang "
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Radical Resection of Adult Low Grade Oligodendroglioma without Adjuvant Therapy: Results of a Prospective Treatment Protocol—Surgical Treatment of Low-Grade Oligodendroglioma  [PDF]
Donald A. Ross, Lynda Yang, Oren Sagher, Amy M. Ross
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2011.22030
Abstract: The goal of this work was to demonstrate prospectively that maximal surgical resection of low grade oligodendrogliomas without adjuvant therapy does not reduce life expectancy over that of historical controls. All patients with surgically accessible grade II oligodendrogliomas underwent maximal resection using stereotactic guidance and/or cortical mapping and were followed with serial MRI scans without adjuvant therapy until either progression or spread into brain regions deemed not surgically resectable. Nineteen patients were treated between 1993 and 2006. Ten patients required reoperation an average of 55 months after their first surgery. Nine patients progressed to anaplastic tumors an average of 42 months after their first surgery: six patients died from their tumors an average of 73 months after diagnosis, two are still alive 76 and 18 months after progression, and one was lost to follow up. Ten patients are alive and progression-free an average of 116 months after diagnosis, one of whom was lost to follow up at 106 months from diagnosis. Four patients are alive and event-free an average of 125 months after diagnosis. All are male and three had tumors in the superior frontal gyrus. The event-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival of our patients are not worse than those of patients treated with postoperative adjuvant therapy. Withholding adjuvant therapy at diagnosis appears to be safe. It will be important to establish the molecular differences between the patients who did very well and those who progressed so that adjuvant therapy could be offered to the latter.
Review of Reshaping the University: Responsibility, Indigenous Epistemes, and the Logic of the Gift
Lynda Lange
Studies in Social Justice , 2010,
Abstract:
Drawing parts together: the philosophy of education of Nel Noddings
Lynda Stone
Utbildning & Demokrati : Tidsskrift f?r Didaktik och Utbildningspolitik , 2006,
Abstract: This essay honors the career and writings of American philosopher ofEducation, Nel Noddings on her first visit to Sweden in Spring 2006. Thetitle is taken from a recent interview in which she discussed connectionsbetween her biography and scholarly contributions. The interview aug-ments analysis of major texts from Noddings out of which the essay’sauthor posits her ‘philosophy of education.’ Following an introductionand biographical situating, sections focus on education and schools, caretheory and teaching, and approaches and thematics within her philo-sophic writings. The essay closes with recognition of Noddings’s interna-tional significance in both philosophy and education.
In Threads and Tatters: Costume, Identification and Female Subjectivity in Mulholland Dr.
Lynda Chapple
Cultural Studies Review , 2011,
Abstract: This arrticle explores the instability and trauma implicit in the representation of the female image in David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr. (2001), and more especially the ways in which this links to the clothing worn by the two female protagonists. By examining the role of mourning and nostalgia, the figure of the amnesiac, the complex pairing, doubling and splitting of the characters of the two female leads, and the relationship of these to identification, it will argue that the costuming practices in this film exemplify a crisis of identification within a specifically feminine cinematic image. The costumes represent an approximation of self; they work as devices that desperately attempt to secure some form of identity, doubling and mirroring the self in a vain, ultimately failed, attempt to fix the female subject and resolve her ontological ambiguity. Within a cinematic context, such a failure represents the breakdown of a central and defining paradigm and raises questions concerning the stability of concepts such as subjectivity and identification.
In threads and tatters : costume, identification and female subjectivity in Mulholland Dr.
Chapple, Lynda
Cultural Studies Review , 2011,
Abstract: This arrticle explores the instability and trauma implicit in the representation of the female image in David Lynch’s Mulholland Dr. (2001), and more especially the ways in which this links to the clothing worn by the two female protagonists. By examining the role of mourning and nostalgia, the figure of the amnesiac, the complex pairing, doubling and splitting of the characters of the two female leads, and the relationship of these to identification, it will argue that the costuming practices in this film exemplify a crisis of identification within a specifically feminine cinematic image. The costumes represent an approximation of self; they work as devices that desperately attempt to secure some form of identity, doubling and mirroring the self in a vain, ultimately failed, attempt to fix the female subject and resolve her ontological ambiguity. Within a cinematic context, such a failure represents the breakdown of a central and defining paradigm and raises questions concerning the stability of concepts such as subjectivity and identification.
Book Review: Jeffrey Wasserstrom. China in the 21 st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Lynda Leavitt
Journal of International and Global Studies , 2011,
Abstract:
Book Review: Mark E. Mendenhall, Joyce S. Osland, Allan Bird, Gary R. Oddou, and Martha L. Maznevski. Global Leadership Research, Practice and Development. London and New York: Routledge, 2008.
Lynda Leavitt
Journal of International and Global Studies , 2010,
Abstract:
Continuous Enrolment: Heresies, Headaches and Heartaches
Lynda Yates
English Language Teaching , 2008, DOI: 10.5539/elt.v1n2p8
Abstract: In this paper I report on a research project designed to address the question of how the policy of continuous enrolment has been working in practice in the AMEP (Adult Migrant English Program), the national English language program offered to newly-arrived migrants to Australia. Managers, teachers and learners from around Australia were interviewed individually or in focus groups to ascertain their views on the policy and its management. The literature on continuous enrolment has focused almost exclusively on adult education in North America, and has generally found little positive support for the policy among teachers. The results of this study indicate that the potential benefits to students in the context of the AMEP may outweigh the considerable disruption to classes it causes. In two of the three participating centres, the students were overall very positive about starting class immediately, and many teachers also appreciated these benefits for students and were developing strategies to minimize the negative effects. Similarly, while the managers generally recognized the organizational and pedagogical headaches that the policy caused, they appreciated the flexibility it gave them to open and manage classes according to local conditions. I argue that these more sympathetic views are a product of the unique context and history of the AMEP as a nationally-supported on-arrivals program, but that positive measures are nevertheless necessary in order to address the issues caused by continuous enrolment.
The Subviral RNA Database: a toolbox for viroids, the hepatitis delta virus and satellite RNAs research
Lynda Rocheleau, Martin Pelchat
BMC Microbiology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-6-24
Abstract: The Subviral RNA database is a web-based environment that facilitates the research and analysis of viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses, the human hepatitis delta virus, and related RNA sequences. It integrates a large number of Subviral RNA sequences, their respective RNA motifs, analysis tools, related publication links and additional pertinent information (ex. links, conferences, announcements), allowing users to efficiently retrieve and analyze relevant information about these small RNA agents.With its design, the Subviral RNA Database could be considered as a fundamental building block for the study of these related RNAs. It is freely available via a web browser at the URL: http://subviral.med.uottawa.ca webcite.Viroids, satellite RNAs, satellites viruses and the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) are the smallest known infectious RNA agents, identified as the Subviral RNAs. The HDV genome consists of a small single-stranded, circular negative sense RNA genome (~1,700 nucleotides, nt) containing self-cleaving motifs (i.e. delta ribozymes), and a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding two viral proteins (HDAgs) [1]. HDV requires the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen for virion assembly and dissemination. Viroids are small non-coding single-stranded circular RNAs (~400 nt) which are unencapsidated and replicate autonomously into host plants [2]. Viroids are grouped into two families based on the presence or not of conserved regions, hammerhead ribozymes and on their subcellular localization (nucleus or chloroplast). Satellites do not possess genes encoding proteins needed for their replication and depend on helper viruses for their multiplication. Satellites include both satellite viruses and satellite nucleic acids. Satellite viruses consist of single-stranded RNA genomes encapsidated by satellite-encoded proteins. Satellite RNAs are a sub-group of satellite nucleic acids and include double-stranded satellite RNAs, and single-stranded satellite RNA
No effect of 14 day consumption of whole grain diet compared to refined grain diet on antioxidant measures in healthy, young subjects: a pilot study
Lynda Enright, Joanne Slavin
Nutrition Journal , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-9-12
Abstract: Twenty healthy subjects took part in a randomized, crossover dietary intervention study. Subjects consumed either a refined grain or whole grain diet for 14 days and then the other diet for the next 14 days. Male subjects consumed 8 servings of grains per day and female subjects consumed 6 servings of grains per day. Blood and urine samples were collected at the end of each diet. Antioxidant measures included oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) in blood, and isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in urine.The whole grain diet was significantly higher in dietary fiber, vitamin B6, folate, selenium, copper, zinc, iron, magnesium and cystine compared to the refined grain diet. Despite high intakes of whole grains, no significant differences were seen in any of the antioxidant measures between the refined and whole grain diets.No differences in antioxidant measures were found when subjects consumed whole grain diets compared to refined grain diets.Epidemiological evidence supports that diets high in whole grain foods decrease risk of chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and many forms of cancer [1]. Whole grain intake is also linked to biomarkers of disease risk, including an inverse association of whole grain intake to incident hypertension [2]. Unfortunately, in the United States only 1% of individuals consume the recommended three servings of whole grain products per day, and approximately 20% consume virtually no whole grain products [1].There are several potential protective components in the whole grain that may be lost in the refining process. These include fermentable carbohydrates, phytochemicals, fiber, antioxidants and non-nutrients such as phenolic acids, lignans and phytoestrogens [1]. Components that are found in the outer layers of the whole grain are removed during the milling process. Researchers have focused on a number of these specific components without evaluating their effects
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