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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 223891 matches for " Luck R "
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Customized toric intraocular lens implantation for correction of extreme corneal astigmatism due to corneal scarring
R Bassily, J Luck
Clinical Optometry , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTO.S9305
Abstract: stomized toric intraocular lens implantation for correction of extreme corneal astigmatism due to corneal scarring Case report (3583) Total Article Views Authors: R Bassily, J Luck Published Date March 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 21 - 24 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTO.S9305 R Bassily, J Luck Ophthalmology Department, Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath, UK Abstract: A 76-year-old woman presented with decreased visual function due to cataract formation. Twenty-five years prior she developed right sided corneal ulceration that left her with 10.8 diopters (D) of irregular astigmatism at 71.8° (steep axis). Her uncorrected visual acuity was 6/24 and could only ever wear a balanced lens due to the high cylindrical error. Cataract surgery was planned with a custom designed toric intraocular lens (IOL) with +16.0 D sphere inserted via a wound at the steep axis of corneal astigmatism. Postoperative refraction was -0.75/+1.50 × 177° with a visual acuity of 6/9 that has remained unchanged at six-week follow-up with no IOL rotation. This case demonstrates the value of high power toric IOLs for the correction of pathological corneal astigmatism.
Customized toric intraocular lens implantation for correction of extreme corneal astigmatism due to corneal scarring
R Bassily,J Luck
Clinical Optometry , 2010,
Abstract: R Bassily, J LuckOphthalmology Department, Royal United Hospital, Combe Park, Bath, UKAbstract: A 76-year-old woman presented with decreased visual function due to cataract formation. Twenty-five years prior she developed right sided corneal ulceration that left her with 10.8 diopters (D) of irregular astigmatism at 71.8° (steep axis). Her uncorrected visual acuity was 6/24 and could only ever wear a balanced lens due to the high cylindrical error. Cataract surgery was planned with a custom designed toric intraocular lens (IOL) with +16.0 D sphere inserted via a wound at the steep axis of corneal astigmatism. Postoperative refraction was -0.75/+1.50 × 177° with a visual acuity of 6/9 that has remained unchanged at six-week follow-up with no IOL rotation. This case demonstrates the value of high power toric IOLs for the correction of pathological corneal astigmatism.Keywords: intraocular lens, corneal ulceration, visual acuity, scarring
Abundances in the Local Region I: G and K Giants
R. Earle Luck
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/88
Abstract: Parameters and abundances for 1133 stars of spectral types F, G, and K of luminosity class III have been derived. In terms of stellar parameters, the primary point of interest is the disagreement between gravities derived with masses determined from isochrones, and gravities determined from an ionization balance. This is not a new result per se; but the size of this sample emphasizes the severity of the problem. A variety of arguments lead to the selection of the ionization balance gravity as the working value. The derived abundances indicate that the giants in the solar region have Sun-like total abundances and abundance ratios. Stellar evolution indicators have also been investigated with the Li abundances and the [C/Fe] and C/O ratios indicating that standard processing has been operating in these stars. The more salient result for stellar evolution is that the [C/Fe] data across the red-giant clump indicates the presence of mass dependent mixing in accord with standard stellar evolution predictions. Keywords: stars: fundamental parameters - stars: abundances - stars: evolution - Galaxy: abundances
Abundance Analysis of Planetary Host Stars I. Differential Iron Abundances
U. Heiter,R. E. Luck
Physics , 2003, DOI: 10.1086/378366
Abstract: We present atmospheric parameters and iron abundances derived from high-resolution spectra for three samples of dwarf stars: stars which are known to host close-in giant planets (CGP), stars for which radial velocity data exclude the presence of a close-in giant planetary companion (no-CGP), as well as a random sample of dwarfs with a spectral type and magnitude distribution similar to that of the planetary host stars (control). All stars have been observed with the same instrument and have been analyzed using the same model atmospheres, atomic data and equivalent width modeling program. Abundances have been derived differentially to the Sun, using a solar spectrum obtained with Callisto as the reflector with the same instrumentation. We find that the iron abundances of CGP dwarfs are on average by 0.22 dex greater than that of no-CGP dwarfs. The iron abundance distributions of both the CGP and no-CGP dwarfs are different than that of the control dwarfs, while the combined iron abundances have a distribution which is very similar to that of the control dwarfs. All four samples (CGP, no-CGP, combined, control) have different effective temperature distributions. We show that metal enrichment occurs only for CGP dwarfs with temperatures just below solar and approximately 300 K higher than solar, whereas the abundance difference is insignificant at Teff around 6000 K.
Abundance analysis of planetary host stars
U. Heiter,R. E. Luck
Physics , 2002,
Abstract: We present atmospheric parameters and Fe abundances derived for the majority of dwarf stars (north of -30 degrees declination) which are up to now known to host extrasolar planets. High-resolution spectra have been obtained with the Sandiford Echelle spectrograph on the 2.1m telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory. We have used the same model atmospheres, atomic data and equivalent width modeling program for the analysis of all stars. Abundances have been derived differentially to the Sun, using a solar spectrum obtained with Callisto as the reflector with the same instrumentation. A similar analysis has been performed for a sample of stars for which radial velocity data exclude the presence of a close-in giant planetary companion. The results are compared to the recent studies found in the literature.
The Distribution of the Elements in the Galactic Disk III. A Reconsideration of Cepheids from l = 30 to 250 Degrees
R. Earle Luck,David L. Lambert
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1088/0004-6256/142/4/136
Abstract: This paper reports on the spectroscopic investigation of 238 Cepheids in the northern sky. Of these stars, about 150 are new to the study of the galactic abundance gradient. These new Cepheids bring the total number of Cepheids involved in abundance distribution studies to over 400. In this work we also consider systematics between various studies and also those which result from the choice of models. We find systematic variations exist at the 0.06 dex level both between studies and model atmospheres. In order to control the systematic effects our final gradients depend only on abundances derived herein. A simple linear fit to the Cepheid data from 398 stars yields a gradient d[Fe/H]/dRG = -0.062 \pm 0.002 dex/kpc which is in good agreement with previously determined values. We have also reexamined the region of the "metallicity island" of Luck et al. (2006). With the doubling of the sample in that region and our internally consistent abundances, we find there is scant evidence for a distinct island. We also find in our sample the first reported Cepheid (V1033 Cyg) with a pronounced Li feature. The Li abundance is consistent with the star being on its red-ward pass towards the first giant branch.
Utility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Mikailov A, Kane I, Aronoff SC, Luck R, DelVecchio MT
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S38652
Abstract: ility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis Review (1533) Total Article Views Authors: Mikailov A, Kane I, Aronoff SC, Luck R, DelVecchio MT Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 23 - 29 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S38652 Received: 29 September 2012 Accepted: 06 November 2012 Published: 16 January 2013 Anar Mikailov,1 Ilona Kane,2 Stephen C Aronoff,3 Raemma Luck,3, Michael T DelVecchio3 1Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, 2St Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Raemma Luck is now deceased Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate macrolides as an adjunct to an asthma controller regimen in children with asthma. Methods: Prospective clinical trials of macrolide therapy in children with asthma using outcome measures of change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or oral corticosteroid requirement were searched for in PubMed up to December 2009. The reference lists of studies were also included in the analysis, as well as those listed in published meta-analyses. Results: The literature search yielded 116 studies, six of which were included in this meta-analysis. The change in FEV1 from baseline with adjunctive use of macrolide therapy in all children was not significant (0.25% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37, 0.86 predicted, P = 0.43); however, the change in FEV1 among children receiving daily oral corticosteroids was significant (3.89% predicted; 95% CI 0.01, 7.79, P = 0.05). Addition of macrolide therapy to the treatment of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma resulted in a statistically significant decrease in daily corticosteroid dosage ( 3.45 mg/day; 95% CI 5.79, 1.09 mg/day, P = 0.004). This reduction in daily corticosteroid dosage was directly proportional to the duration of macrolide therapy ( 0.17 mg methylprednisolone per week of macrolide therapy; 95% CI 0.33, 0.021, P = 0.025). Conclusion: Addition of macrolides to the treatment regimen of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma improves FEV1 and decreases the daily dosage of corticosteroids required for control in these children. The degree of dose reduction is directly related to the duration of macrolide therapy. Additional large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive macrolide use in children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma are required to verify this observation.
Utility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Mikailov A,Kane I,Aronoff SC,Luck R
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2013,
Abstract: Anar Mikailov,1 Ilona Kane,2 Stephen C Aronoff,3 Raemma Luck,3, Michael T DelVecchio31Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, 2St Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Raemma Luck is now deceasedBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate macrolides as an adjunct to an asthma controller regimen in children with asthma.Methods: Prospective clinical trials of macrolide therapy in children with asthma using outcome measures of change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or oral corticosteroid requirement were searched for in PubMed up to December 2009. The reference lists of studies were also included in the analysis, as well as those listed in published meta-analyses.Results: The literature search yielded 116 studies, six of which were included in this meta-analysis. The change in FEV1 from baseline with adjunctive use of macrolide therapy in all children was not significant (0.25% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37, 0.86 predicted, P = 0.43); however, the change in FEV1 among children receiving daily oral corticosteroids was significant (3.89% predicted; 95% CI 0.01, 7.79, P = 0.05). Addition of macrolide therapy to the treatment of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma resulted in a statistically significant decrease in daily corticosteroid dosage ( 3.45 mg/day; 95% CI 5.79, 1.09 mg/day, P = 0.004). This reduction in daily corticosteroid dosage was directly proportional to the duration of macrolide therapy ( 0.17 mg methylprednisolone per week of macrolide therapy; 95% CI 0.33, 0.021, P = 0.025).Conclusion: Addition of macrolides to the treatment regimen of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma improves FEV1 and decreases the daily dosage of corticosteroids required for control in these children. The degree of dose reduction is directly related to the duration of macrolide therapy. Additional large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive macrolide use in children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma are required to verify this observation.Keywords: chronic asthma, macrolides, corticosteroid sparing
Spontaneous symmetry breaking: exact results for a biased random walk model of an exclusion process
C. Godreche,J. M. Luck,M. R. Evans,D. Mukamel,S. Sandow,E. R. Speer
Physics , 1995, DOI: 10.1088/0305-4470/28/21/011
Abstract: It has been recently suggested that a totally asymmetric exclusion process with two species on an open chain could exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking in some range of the parameters defining its dynamics. The symmetry breaking is manifested by the existence of a phase in which the densities of the two species are not equal. In order to provide a more rigorous basis to these observations we consider the limit of the process when the rate at which particles leave the system goes to zero. In this limit the process reduces to a biased random walk in the positive quarter plane, with specific boundary conditions. The stationary probability measure of the position of the walker in the plane is shown to be concentrated around two symmetrically located points, one on each axis, corresponding to the fact that the system is typically in one of the two states of broken symmetry in the exclusion process. We compute the average time for the walker to traverse the quarter plane from one axis to the other, which corresponds to the average time separating two flips between states of broken symmetry in the exclusion process. This time is shown to diverge exponentially with the size of the chain.
tert-Butyl 2-methyl-2-(4-nitrobenzoyl)propanoate
Chelsey M. Crosse,Marshall W. Logue,Rudy L. Luck,Louis R. Pignotti
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2010, DOI: 10.1107/s1600536810003119
Abstract: The title compound, C15H19NO5, is bent with a dihedral angle of 61.8 (2)° between the mean planes of the benzene ring and a group encompassing the ester functionality (O=C—O—C). The dihedral angle of 0.8 (2)° between the mean planes of the nitro group and the benzene ring indicates near coplanarity. In the crystal, each molecule is linked to four adjacent molecules by weak C—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions. Both benzene H atoms ortho to the ketone O atom form C—H...O hydrogen bonds with the keto O atoms of two neighboring molecules (of the keto and ester groups, respectively), and the two other interactions involve the H atoms from a methyl group of the dimethyl residue, displaying C—H...O interactions with the O atoms of the nitro groups. These four interactions for each molecule lead to the formation of two-dimensional sheets with a hydrophilic interior, held together by weak hydrogen-bonded interactions, and a hydrophobic exterior composed of protruding methyl groups which interstack with the methyl groups in adjacent sheets.
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