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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 933 matches for " Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen "
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Vitamin D Status and Cause-Specific Mortality: A General Population Study
Tea Skaaby, Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen, Charlotta Pisinger, Torben J?rgensen, Betina Heinsb?k Thuesen, Mogens Fenger, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052423
Abstract: Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality in observational studies. The specific causes of death underlying this association lack clarity. We investigated the association between vitamin D status and cause-specific mortality. Methods We included a total of 9,146 individuals from the two population-based studies, Monica10 and Inter99, conducted in 1993–94 and 1999–2001, respectively. Vitamin D status was assessed as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Information on causes of death was obtained from The Danish Register of Causes of Death until 31 December 2009. There were a total of 832 deaths (median follow-up 10.3 years). Results Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and vitamin D quartiles showed significant associations between vitamin D status and death caused by diseases of the respiratory system, the digestive system, and endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases with hazard ratios (HRs) 0.26 (ptrend = 0.0042), 0.28 (ptrend = 0.0040), and 0.21 (ptrend = 0.035), respectively, for the fourth vitamin D quartile compared to the first. We found non-significantly lower HRs for death caused by mental and behavioural diseases and diseases of the nervous system, but no association between vitamin D status and death caused by neoplasms or diseases of the circulatory system. Conclusion The associations of vitamin D status and cause-specific mortality suggest that we also look elsewhere (than to cardiovascular disease and cancer) to explain the inverse association between vitamin D status and mortality.
Vitamin D Status and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective General Population Study
Tea Skaaby, Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen, Betina Heinsb?k Thuesen, Charlotta Pisinger, Torben J?rgensen, Runa Vavia Fenger, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090654
Abstract: Objectives Vitamin D deficiency is common among persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether vitamin D affects the development and deterioration of COPD or is a consequence of the disease lacks clarity. We investigated the association between vitamin D status and prevalent and incident COPD in the general population. Methods We included a total of 12,041 individuals from three general population studies conducted in 1993–94, 1999–2001, and 2006–2008, respectively, with vitamin D measurements. Information on COPD was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register and The Danish Registry of Causes of Death. Results There were 85 prevalent and 463 incident cases of COPD (median follow-up 9.7 years). We found a statistically significant inverse association between vitamin D status and prevalent COPD with odds ratio = 0.89 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.79, 1.0), but no statistically significant association with incident COPD with a hazard ratio = 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.0), respectively, per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D status, when adjusted for possible confounders. Conclusions We found a statistically significant inverse cross-sectional association between vitamin D status and COPD, but no association between vitamin D status and incident COPD.
Cause-Specific Mortality According to Urine Albumin Creatinine Ratio in the General Population
Tea Skaaby, Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen, Tarunveer Singh Ahluwalia, Peter Rossing, Torben J?rgensen, Betina Heinsb?k Thuesen, Charlotta Pisinger, Knud Rasmussen, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093212
Abstract: Background Urine albumin creatinine ratio, UACR, is positively associated with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and diabetes in observational studies. Whether a high UACR is also associated with other causes of death is unclear. We investigated the association between UACR and cause-specific mortality. Methods We included a total of 9,125 individuals from two population-based studies, Monica10 and Inter99, conducted in 1993–94 and 1999–2001, respectively. Urine albumin creatinine ratio was measured from spot urine samples by standard methods. Information on causes of death was obtained from The Danish Register of Causes of Death until 31 December 2010. There were a total of 920 deaths, and the median follow-up was 11.3 years. Results Multivariable Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis showed statistically significant positive associations between UACR status and risk of all-cause mortality, endocrine nutritional and metabolic diseases, mental and behavioural disorders, diseases of the circulatory system, and diseases of the respiratory system with hazard ratios 1.56, 6.98, 2.34, 2.03, and 1.91, for the fourth UACR compared with the first, respectively. Using UACR as a continuous variable, we also found a statistically significant positive association with risk of death caused by diseases of the digestive system with a hazard ratio of 1.02 per 10 mg/g higher UACR. Conclusion We found statistically significant positive associations between baseline UACR and death from all-cause mortality, endocrine nutritional and metabolic diseases, and diseases of the circulatory system and possibly mental and behavioural disorders, and diseases of the respiratory and digestive system.
Vitamin D Status, Filaggrin Genotype, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Mendelian Randomization Approach
Tea Skaaby, Lise Lotte Nystrup Husemoen, Torben Martinussen, Jacob P. Thyssen, Michael Melgaard, Betina Heinsb?k Thuesen, Charlotta Pisinger, Torben J?rgensen, Jeanne D. Johansen, Torkil Menné, Berit Carlsen, Pal B. Szecsi, Steen Stender, Runa Vavia Fenger, Mogens Fenger, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0057647
Abstract: Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk in observational studies. Whether these associations are causal is not clear. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene result in up to 10% higher serum vitamin D concentrations, supposedly due to a decreased UV-protection of the keratinocytes. We used a Mendelian randomization approach to estimate the causal effect of vitamin D status on serum lipids, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and the metabolic syndrome. Methods Three population based studies were included, Monica10 (2,656 individuals aged 40–71 years), Inter99 (6,784 individuals aged 30–60 years), and Health2006 (3,471 individuals aged 18–69 years) conducted in 1993–94, 1999–2001, and 2006–2008, respectively. Participants were genotyped for the two most common filaggrin gene mutations in European descendants R501X and 2282del4, in all three studies and further for the R2447X mutation in the Inter99 and Health2006 studies. Filaggrin genotype was used as instrumental variable for vitamin D status. Baseline measurements of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D were performed in all three studies. Results Instrumental variable analyses showed a 23.8% (95% confidence interval, CI 3.0, 48.6) higher HDL cholesterol level and a 30.5% (95% CI: 0.8, 51.3) lower serum level of triglycerides per doubling of vitamin D. These associations were, however, not statistically significant when applying the Bonferroni adjusted significance level. The remaining lipids showed non-significant changes in a favorable direction. Doubling of vitamin D gave a non-significantly lower odds ratio = 0.26 (95% CI: 0.06, 1.17) of the metabolic syndrome. There were no statistically significant causal effects of vitamin D status on blood pressure, body mass index, or waist circumference. Conclusion Our results support a causal effect of higher vitamin D status on a more favorable lipid profile, although more studies in other populations are needed to confirm our results.
The Association of Alcohol and Alcohol Metabolizing Gene Variants with Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in a White Population
Lise Lotte N. Husemoen,Torben J?rgensen,Knut Borch-Johnsen,Torben Hansen,Oluf Pedersen,Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011735
Abstract: Epidemiological studies have shown a J- or U-shaped relation between alcohol and type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). The underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim was to examine the association between alcohol intake and diabetes and intermediate CHD risk factors in relation to selected ADH and ALDH gene variants.
No Association between Loss-of-Function Mutations in filaggrin and Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, and All-Cause Mortality
Lise Lotte N. Husemoen, Tea Skaaby, Torben J?rgensen, Jacob P. Thyssen, Michael Meldgaard, Pal B. Szecsi, Steen Stender, Jeanne Duus Johansen, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084293
Abstract: Background Common loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are a major predisposing risk factor for atopic disease due to reduced epidermal filaggrin protein levels. We previously observed an association between these mutations and type 2 diabetes and hypothesized that an inherited impairment of skin barrier functions could facilitate low-grade inflammation and hence increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We examined the association between loss-of-function mutations in FLG and diabetes, stroke, ischemic heart disease (IHD), and all-cause mortality in the general population. Methods The R501X and 2282del4 loss-of function mutations in FLG were genotyped in four Danish study populations including a total of 13373 adults aged 15-77 years. Two of the studies also genotyped the R2447X mutation. By linkage to Danish national central registers we obtained information for all participants on dates of diagnoses of diabetes, stroke, and IHD, as well as all-cause mortality. Data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models and combined by fixed effect meta-analyses. Results In meta-analyses combining the results from the four individual studies, carriage of loss-of-function mutations in FLG was not associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) = 0.95 (0.73, 1.23), stroke (HR (95% CI) = 1.27 (0.97, 1.65), ischemic heart disease (HR (95%CI) = 0.92 (0.71, 1.19), and all-cause mortality (HR (95%CI) = 1.02 (0.83, 1.25)). Similar results were obtained when including prevalent cases in logistic regression models. Conclusion Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in FLG are not associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. However, larger studies with longer follow-up are needed to exclude any associations.
Associations of Filaggrin Gene Loss-of-Function Variants and Human Papillomavirus-Related Cancer and Pre-Cancer in Danish Adults
Tea Skaaby, Lise Lotte N. Husemoen, Torben J?rgensen, Jeanne D. Johansen, Torkil Menné, Pal B. Szecsi, Steen Stender, Peter Bager, Jacob P. Thyssen, Allan Linneberg
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099437
Abstract: Purpose Filaggrin proteins are expressed in the skin, oral cavity, oesophagus, and cervical mucose. Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) reduce filaggrin expression and cause an impaired skin barrier function. We hypothesized that FLG mutation carriers would be more susceptible to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and thus a higher risk of HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer. We investigated the association of the FLG genotype with incidence of HPV-related cancer of cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, anus and head and neck, and pre-cancer of the cervix. Methods We included 13,376 persons from four population-based studies conducted in the same background population in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants were genotyped for the most common FLG mutations in Europeans. Information on cancer was obtained from The Danish Cancer Registry until 11 July 2011. Results There were 489 cases of prevalent and 97 cases of incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer (median follow-up 11.5 years). There was a statistically significant association between FLG genotype and incident HPV-related cancer and pre-cancer with a hazard ratio, HR = 2.1 (95% confidence intervals, CI: 1.2, 3.7) for FLG mutation carriers vs. wild types. Conclusions FLG loss-of-function mutations were associated with higher incidence of HPV-related cancers and pre-cancers that are potentially screening and vaccine preventable.
Genetic Architecture of Vitamin B12 and Folate Levels Uncovered Applying Deeply Sequenced Large Datasets
Niels Grarup equal contributor,Patrick Sulem equal contributor,Camilla H. Sandholt equal contributor,Gudmar Thorleifsson,Tarunveer S. Ahluwalia,Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir,Helgi Bjarnason,Daniel F. Gudbjartsson,Olafur T. Magnusson,Thomas Spars?,Anders Albrechtsen,Augustine Kong,Gisli Masson,Geng Tian,Hongzhi Cao,Chao Nie,Karsten Kristiansen,Lise Lotte Husemoen,Betina Thuesen,Yingrui Li,Rasmus Nielsen,Allan Linneberg,Isleifur Olafsson,Gudmundur I. Eyjolfsson,Torben J?rgensen,Jun Wang,Torben Hansen,Unnur Thorsteinsdottir,Kari Stefánsson ,Oluf Pedersen
PLOS Genetics , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003530
Abstract: Genome-wide association studies have mainly relied on common HapMap sequence variations. Recently, sequencing approaches have allowed analysis of low frequency and rare variants in conjunction with common variants, thereby improving the search for functional variants and thus the understanding of the underlying biology of human traits and diseases. Here, we used a large Icelandic whole genome sequence dataset combined with Danish exome sequence data to gain insight into the genetic architecture of serum levels of vitamin B12 (B12) and folate. Up to 22.9 million sequence variants were analyzed in combined samples of 45,576 and 37,341 individuals with serum B12 and folate measurements, respectively. We found six novel loci associating with serum B12 (CD320, TCN2, ABCD4, MMAA, MMACHC) or folate levels (FOLR3) and confirmed seven loci for these traits (TCN1, FUT6, FUT2, CUBN, CLYBL, MUT, MTHFR). Conditional analyses established that four loci contain additional independent signals. Interestingly, 13 of the 18 identified variants were coding and 11 of the 13 target genes have known functions related to B12 and folate pathways. Contrary to epidemiological studies we did not find consistent association of the variants with cardiovascular diseases, cancers or Alzheimer's disease although some variants demonstrated pleiotropic effects. Although to some degree impeded by low statistical power for some of these conditions, these data suggest that sequence variants that contribute to the population diversity in serum B12 or folate levels do not modify the risk of developing these conditions. Yet, the study demonstrates the value of combining whole genome and exome sequencing approaches to ascertain the genetic and molecular architectures underlying quantitative trait associations.
Genetic and Environmental Factors Influencing the Placental Growth Factor (PGF) Variation in Two Populations
Rossella Sorice, Daniela Ruggiero, Teresa Nutile, Mario Aversano, Lotte Husemoen, Allan Linneberg, Catherine Bourgain, Anne-Louise Leutenegger, Marina Ciullo
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0042537
Abstract: Placental Growth Factor (PGF) is a key molecule in angiogenesis. Several studies have revealed an important role of PGF primarily in pathological conditions (e.g.: ischaemia, tumour formation, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes) suggesting its use as a potential therapeutic agent. However, to date, no information is available regarding the genetics of PGF variability. Furthermore, even though the effect of environmental factors (e.g.: cigarette smoking) on angiogenesis has been explored, no data on the influence of these factors on PGF levels have been reported so far. Here we have first investigated PGF variability in two cohorts focusing on non-genetic risk factors: a study sample from two isolated villages in the Cilento region, South Italy (N = 871) and a replication sample from the general Danish population (N = 1,812). A significant difference in PGF mean levels was found between the two cohorts. However, in both samples, we observed a strong correlation of PGF levels with ageing and sex, men displaying PGF levels significantly higher than women. Interestingly, smoking was also found to influence the trait in the two populations, although differently. We have then focused on genetic risk factors. The association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the PGF gene and the plasma levels of the protein was investigated. Two polymorphisms (rs11850328 and rs2268614) were associated with the PGF plasma levels in the Cilento sample and these associations were strongly replicated in the Danish sample. These results, for the first time, support the hypothesis of the presence of genetic and environmental factors influencing PGF plasma variability.
Intertwining caring science, caring practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective—two contextual examples
Ulrica H?rberg,Lise-lotte Ozolins,Margaretha Ekebergh
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health & Well-Being , 2011, DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i4.10363
Abstract: This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning support that can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caring and learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and well-being as well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In this article, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from life and thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding of the intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring and learning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person's health and learning processes.
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