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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 151277 matches for " Leonard H;Mwangi "
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The Effects of a DNA Virus Infection on the Reproductive Potential of Female Tsetse Flies, Glossina morsitans centralis and Glossina morsitans morsitans (Diptera: Glossinidae)
Sang, Rosemary C;Jura, Walter GZO;Otieno, Leonard H;Mwangi, Richard W;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02761998000600030
Abstract: reproductive anomalies associated with the tsetse dna virus infection in the female tsetse hosts, glossina morsitans centralis machado and glossina morsitans morsitans westwood, inoculated with the virus during the 3rd instar larval stage were studied and the data compared to those obtained from the control females injected with sterile physiological saline. virus infected flies had significantly longer first and second pregnancy cycles (p<0.0001) and produced pupae that were of significantly less weight in milligrams (p<0.0001) compared to controls. transmission of the virus to progeny was not absolute and only 21% of g. m. centralis and 48% of g. m. morsitans first progeny flies from infected females developed salivary gland hypertrophy as a result of transmission from mother to progeny. the virus infected females produced significantly fewere pupae compared to the controls during the experimental period (p<0.00001).
The Effects of a DNA Virus Infection on the Reproductive Potential of Female Tsetse Flies, Glossina morsitans centralis and Glossina morsitans morsitans (Diptera: Glossinidae)
Sang Rosemary C,Jura Walter GZO,Otieno Leonard H,Mwangi Richard W
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1998,
Abstract: Reproductive anomalies associated with the tsetse DNA virus infection in the female tsetse hosts, Glossina morsitans centralis Machado and Glossina morsitans morsitans Westwood, inoculated with the virus during the 3rd instar larval stage were studied and the data compared to those obtained from the control females injected with sterile physiological saline. Virus infected flies had significantly longer first and second pregnancy cycles (P<0.0001) and produced pupae that were of significantly less weight in milligrams (P<0.0001) compared to controls. Transmission of the virus to progeny was not absolute and only 21% of G. m. centralis and 48% of G. m. morsitans first progeny flies from infected females developed salivary gland hypertrophy as a result of transmission from mother to progeny. The virus infected females produced significantly fewere pupae compared to the controls during the experimental period (P<0.00001).
The uniqueness of a distance-regular graph with intersection array {32,27,8,1;1,4,27,32} and related results
Leonard H. Soicher
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: It is known that, up to isomorphism, there is a unique distance-regular graph $\Delta$ with intersection array {32,27;1,12} (equivalently, $\Delta$ is the unique strongly regular graph with parameters (105,32,4,12)). Here we investigate the distance-regular antipodal covers of $\Delta$. We show that, up to isomorphism, there is just one distance-regular antipodal triple cover of $\Delta$ (a graph $\hat\Delta$ discovered by the author over twenty years ago), proving that there is a unique distance-regular graph with intersection array {32,27,8,1;1,4,27,32}. In the process, we confirm an unpublished result of Steve Linton that there is no distance-regular antipodal double cover of $\Delta$, and so no distance-regular graph with intersection array {32,27,6,1;1,6,27,32}. We also show there is no distance-regular antipodal 4-cover of $\Delta$, and so no distance-regular graph with intersection array {32,27,9,1;1,3,27,32}, and that there is no distance-regular antipodal 6-cover of $\Delta$ that is a double cover of $\hat\Delta$.
Perceptions and Use of Herbal Remedies among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Murang’a North District, Kenya  [PDF]
Joshua Mwangi, Lucy Gitonga
Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics (OJCD) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojcd.2014.43024
Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with a world wide distribution. Use of herbal remedies has been on increase with World Health Organization estimating that 80 percent of the world’s population presently uses some form of herbal medicine for some aspect of primary health care. Objectives of this study were therefore to determine the perceptions people with diabetes mellitus have towards herbal remedies, to determine the extent to which they use herbal remedies and also to establish whether there is any association between the perceptions people have on herbal remedies and use of herbal remedies. The study was carried out in Murang’a District, in Mathioya and Kangema Constituencies where five community health units were purposively selected to participate in the study based on their level of establishment in community health strategy. Data was collected using interview schedules. SPSS was used for data analysis. Significant findings from this study were: a significant number of the respondents (15%) were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus when already admitted in the wards prior to which period they had no idea that they were diabetic, over 86% of those interviewed were given information on diabetes management on diagnosis and they attend hospital clinics for follow-up regularly and therefore this means that the reason for seeking alternative modes of treatment is not due to lack of information on diabetes but due to other reasons, 12.4% of those interviewed admitted using herbal remedies as part of their management of diabetes. Recommendations made following the study were: the government of Kenya through Ministry of Health should encourage rigorous screening of clients and population in general for diabetes to ensure diabetes is diagnosed early and put under appropriate management and that the government of Kenya through Ministry of Health should put up a campaign educating diabetic patients on the potential dangers associated with combining herbal remedies with contemporary medicines due to their interactions.
Virally associated arthritis 2008: clinical, epidemiologic, and pathophysiologic considerations
Dimitrios Vassilopoulos, Leonard H Calabrese
Arthritis Research & Therapy , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/ar2480
Abstract: The spectrum of human viral infections is vast. Considering their ubiquity, clinically significant rheumatic manifestations, including arthritis, are relatively rare. Despite this generality, viral infections can and do cause a number of clinically important arthritic syndromes. Some are acute, mimicking early-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) such as seen in parvovirus B19 and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and others. Alternatively, some viral infections are associated with more chronic forms of arthritis, which can be challenging both diagnostically as well as therapeutically. Other infections are important from a public health perspective and the rheumatologist may have the opportunity to make an early diagnosis of a serious or epidemic condition. It is beyond the scope of this review to describe all viral infections with reported arthritic complications. The goal is to highlight those infections that are most relevant to the rheumatology practitioner by providing pertinent information on the pathogen, its epidemiology, presumed pathogenic mechanisms, most common clinical features of articular disease, and principles of therapy.Viral infections can be classified based on a number of microbiologic and molecular features and are organized most broadly as to whether their genomes contain DNA or RNA and whether they encode and replicate through reverse transcriptase. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses has recognized 5,450 viruses as specific species based on molecular structure and organized into families [1]. A more practical approach of classification is to consider the pathogen based on its clinical pattern of infection [2]. Acute viral infections are those with a finite beginning and end in which it appears that the host is capable of overcoming the assault by ridding itself of the invader. Such is the pattern of many common infections, including rhinovirus and influenza, in which there appears to be no significant incidence of viral latency or
Masculinity and Nationalism in East African Hip-Hop Music
Ewan Mwangi
Tydskrif vir letterkunde , 2004,
Abstract: Masculinity and Nationalism in East African Hip-Hop Music [English] East African music aligns itself with nationalistic desires while attempting to create a transnational and regional agenda that goes beyond individual nation-states. Hip-hop music appears at pains to define itself as different from the western art-forms with which it is hastily associated by instantiating localized forms and creating a different locution. This paper surveys East African hip-hop to demonstrate that the music is a productive site upon which the local, the national, and the global contest and negotiate. We demonstrate that central to the music's identity politics is the notion of masculinity, in which the construction of community is interpreted as a masculine enterprise. The audiences also invest the music with political and nationalist meanings that are fraught with sexualized readings. On the whole, the music rejects hostile nationalism but male artists tend to represent women negatively in their grand national, regional, and pan-African projects. Indirectly indicating the depth of the hegemonic masculinism they operate under, women artistes express a desire to deconstruct male constructs. At the same time they suggest that, in spite of themselves, their critique has to be cautious and subtle. Key Words: Masculinity, Nationalism, hip-hop music, East Africa Tydskrif vir letterkunde Vol. 41(2) 2004: 5-20
Impact of Culture on Financial Management in Africa
BW Mwangi
Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa , 2007,
Abstract: One of the major challenges of the accounting profession in Africa is the impact of culture on accounting systems. People from different societies view accounting as an imposed idea from another continent. They also find it culturally imposing and punitive and in most cases the demands of accounting go contrary to the cultural norms in a given society. Perhaps it is the way people perceive and react to the word accounting or the ‘idea of accounting'. It is important to note that every society has its norms and standards of language use in communication. These norms and standards play a significant role in the way messages are coded (worded) by the sender, the way they are transmitted (relaying of the message) and the way the receiver of the message decodes (understands and reacts to the message). Journal of Language, Technology and Entrepreneurship in Africa Vol. 1 (1) 2007 pp. 84-96
To Depreciate or not to Depreciate Non-governmental Fixed Assets
BW Mwangi
Journal of Language, Technology & Entrepreneurship in Africa , 2009,
Abstract: In the last two decades Africa and particularly Kenya has experienced an exponential growth of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs). This is attributed to the fact that they are established to solve immediate humanitarian problems that result from war, famine, poverty and bad governance in most countries in Africa. Given the magnitude of the resultant social challenges, NGOs have in time grown to control immense amounts of financial resources. It is therefore pertinent that they not only account for their social activities but also for these financial resources. The focus of this discussion is on the accounting of these funds and specifically in the area of depreciation. In an attempt to establish rules and regulations that ensure that NGOs account for their financial resources business accounting principles and standards have largely been prescribed for the accounting and auditing of NGOs. And this has been without due consideration of the significant differences between the nature of operation of NGOs and business enterprises. One of the major differences is that the core business of NGOs is to provide humanitarian services which are not measurable in monetary terms, while that of business enterprises is to carry out activities that will generate profit and subsequently increase the wealth of owners of the business.
On Valuing Constant Maturity Swap Spread Derivatives  [PDF]
Leonard Tchuindjo
Journal of Mathematical Finance (JMF) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jmf.2012.22020
Abstract: Motivated by statistical tests on historical data that confirm the normal distribution assumption on the spreads between major constant maturity swap (CMS) indexes, we propose an easy-to-implement two-factor model for valuing CMS spread link instruments, in which each forward CMS spread rate is modeled as a Gaussian process under its relevant measure, and is related to the lognormal martingale process of a corresponding maturity forward LIBOR rate through a Brownian motion. An illustrating example is provided. Closed-form solutions for CMS spread options are derived.
Radical cascades using enantioenriched 7-azabenzonorbornenes and their applications in synthesis
David M Hodgson,Leonard H Winning
Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry , 2008, DOI: 10.3762/bjoc.4.38
Abstract: Tandem deoxygenation–neophyl-type radical rearrangement–electrophile trapping using xanthates from 7-azabenzonorbornadienes gives 3-exo-substituted 2-aza-5,6-benzonorbornenes, which in some cases undergo isomerisation to (aminomethyl)indenes. The starting xanthates are accessible in good yields and high enantiomeric ratios via asymmetric hydroboration of (aryne/pyrrole-derived) 7-azabenzonorbornadienes. Oxidation (using RuO4) and Birch reduction of the 2-aza-5,6-benzonorbornenes provide access to substituted pyrrolidines and tetrahydroindenes, respectively.
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