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Search Results: 1 - 7 of 7 matches for " Lemessa Olijira "
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Children Who Received PCV-10 Vaccine from a Two-Dose Vial without Preservative Are Not More Likely to Develop Injection Site Abscess Compared with Those Who Received Pentavalent (DPT-HepB-Hib) Vaccine: A Longitudinal Multi-Site Study
Yemane Berhane, Alemayehu Worku, Meaza Demissie, Neghist Tesfaye, Nega Asefa, Worku Aniemaw, Berhe Weldearegawi, Yigzaw Kebede, Tigist Shiferaw, Amare Worku, Lemessa Olijira, Behailu Merdekios, Yemane Ashebir, Takele Tadesse, Yadeta Dessie, Solomon Meseret, Gestane Ayele
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0097376
Abstract: Background The single dose pneumonia ten-valent vaccine has been widely used and is highly efficacious against selected strains Streptococcus pneumonia. A two-dose vial without preservative is being introduced in developing countries to reduce the cost of the vaccine. In routine settings improper immunization practice could result in microbial contamination leading to adverse events following immunization. Objective To monitor adverse events following immunization recommended for routine administration during infancy by comparing the rate of injection-site abscess between children who received PCV-10 vaccine and children who received the Pentavalent (DPT-HepB-Hib) vaccine. Methods A longitudinal population-based multi-site observational study was conducted between September 2011 and October 2012. The study was conducted in four existing Health and Demographic Surveillance sites run by public universities of Abraminch, Haramaya, Gondar and Mekelle. Adverse events following Immunization were monitored by trained data collectors. Children were identified at the time of vaccination and followed at home at 48 hour and 7 day following immunization. Incidence of abscess and relative risk with the corresponding 95% Confidence Intervals were calculated to examine the risk difference in the comparison groups. Results A total of 55, 268 PCV and 37, 480 Pentavalent (DPT-HepB-Hib) vaccinations were observed. A total of 19 adverse events following immunization, 10 abscesses and 9 deaths, were observed during the one year study period. The risk of developing abscess was not statistically different between children who received PCV-10 vaccine and those received Pentavalent (RR = 2.7, 95% CI 0.576–12.770), and between children who received the first aliquot of PCV and those received the second aliquot of PCV (RR = 1.72, 95% CI 0.485–6.091). Conclusion No significant increase in the risk of injection site abscess was observed between the injection sites of PCV-10 vaccine from a two-dose vial without preservative and pentavalent (DPT-HepB-Hib) vaccine in the first 7 days following vaccination.
The Impact of Training and Development on Employee Performance and Effectiveness: A Case Study of District Five Administration Office, Bole Sub-City, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  [PDF]
Abeba Mitiku Asfaw, Mesele Damte Argaw, Lemessa Bayissa
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies (JHRSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jhrss.2015.34025
Abstract: The focus of this study was to determine the impact of training and development on the employees’ performance and effectiveness at District Five Administration Office, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. In this study we employed cross sectional institutional based quantitative research method. Data were collected using Likert’s scale tool from 100 employees after selecting participants using systematic random sampling technique. Ninety-four complete questionnaires with a response rate of 94% were considered during analysis. Training and development had positively correlated and claimed statistically significant relationship with employee performance and effectiveness. It is recommended that District Five Administration Office shall maintain providing employee training and development activities and ensure the participation of employees in planning, need or skill deficit identification and evaluation of training and development programs.
Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital, South West Ethiopia
Lemessa Oljira, Solomon Gebre-Selassie
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2001,
Abstract: Background: The opinions of users about the health care services and the degree of their satisfaction may indicate the efficiency of the services. Objective: To assess consumer satisfaction of outpatient health care services. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted at Jimma hospital from November to February 1999. Data were collected by health-workers using pre-tested, structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 385 outpatients, females, were interviewed at exit of hospital. The majority, 140 (36.4%) of the users were within the age group of 30-39 years. About 56% of the females visited the hospital for children's health care while 87.2% of the males visited for own health care. Overall, 57.1% of interviewee believed that the service they received was either good or very good. Satisfaction with health care was found to have a direct relationship with increase in age but has an inverse relation with increase in educational level of respondents. It has a significant association with length of waiting and consultation time, type of investigations performed and securing prescribed medications from hospital pharmacy (P<0.05). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the study, efficient health service management to improve drug supply and quality of service are recommended. (Ethiopian Journal of Health Development, 2001, 15(3): 179-184)
Patterns of sexual risk behavior among undergraduate university students in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
Tariku Dingeta, Lemessa Oljira, Nega Assefa
Pan African Medical Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Introduction: As part of the young age bracket, undergraduate university students are exposed to a range of risky behaviors including HIV/AIDS. Given the paucity of data among the risk behaviors of African university students, this study was conducted to examine the sexual risk behaviors of this group in Ethiopia. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on socio-demographic and sexual risk behavior characteristics among 1,286 undergraduate students at Haramaya University, Ethiopia from March to April, 2010. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results: About 355 (28%; 95% CI 25.5-30.5) students reported to have had sexual intercourse at least once. More proportion of male students ever had sex compared to females (OR 4.8; 95% CI 3.4-6.8, p<0.001). One fifth (22.8%) of these students had their sexual debut after they joined university. About six percent of students with sexual experience reported having had intercourse with same-sex partners. Half of the males with sexual experience had intercourse with a commercial sex worker. About 60% of students reported to have used a condom rarely. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that there is a high level of sexual risk behavior among the study population. Significant proportion of students were sexually active, the majority started sexual intercourse before they joined university. We recommend awareness campaigns and interventions on sexual and reproductive health issues for high school and university students in Ethiopia. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 12:33
Association Between Angular Leaf Spot (Phaeoisariopsis griseola (Sacc.) Ferraris) and Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Yield Loss at Jimma, Southwestern Ethiopia
Fikre Lemessa,Waktole Sori,Mulatu Wakjira
Plant Pathology Journal , 2011,
Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in the tropics is usually limited by damage due to Angular Leaf Spot (ALS) caused by Phaeoisariopsis grisola. Field experiments were conducted in 2005, 2006 and 2007 at Jimma, Ethiopia, to determine the amount of yield loss due to ALS and to investigate the relationship between ALS and bean yield. Different levels of disease severity were created on two common bean varieties (GLPX-92 and ICA15541) using natural epidemics by spraying the fungicide benomyl at 7-14- 21 and 28-day intervals and by seed dressing. Generally, all fungicide sprays significantly reduced ALS severity and increased yield and seed weight but seed dressing did not affect significantly. The relative yield and seed weight losses to ALS ranged from 2 to 47 and 15 to 33%, respectively. Single-point regression models predicted that for each per cent increase in ALS severity, there was a seed yield loss of 18 to 124.5 kg ha-1 in GLPX and 12.9 to 103.9 kg ha-1 for ICA15541 and 100-seed weight loss per sample of 100 seeds of 10 to 13 g for GLPX-92 and 13 to 22 mg for ICA15541. The study suggests that fungicide sprays affect ALS epidemics and influence the amount of loss in yield attributable to ALS permitting the crop to reach physiological maturity without being under severe infection. Thus fungicide sprays can be used as a means to reduce ALS severity and increase common bean yield.
Assessment of comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge level among in-school adolescents in eastern Ethiopia
Lemessa Oljira,Yemane Berhane,Alemayehu Worku
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2013, DOI: 10.7448/ias.16.1.17349
Abstract: Introduction: In Ethiopia, more adolescents are in school today than ever before; however, there are no studies that have assessed their comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS. Thus, this study tried to assess the level of this knowledge and the factors associated with it among in-school adolescents in eastern Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional school-based study was conducted using a facilitator-guided self-administered questionnaire. The respondents were students attending regular school in 14 high schools located in 14 different districts in eastern Ethiopia. The proportion of in-school adolescents with comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge was computed and compared by sex. The factors that were associated with the comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge were assessed using bivariate and multivariable logistic regression. Results: Only about one in four, 677 (24.5%), in-school adolescents have comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge. The knowledge was better among in-school adolescents from families with a relatively middle or high wealth index (adjusted OR [95% CI]=1.39 [1.03–1.87] and 1.75 [1.24–2.48], respectively), who got HIV/AIDS information mainly from friends or mass media (adjusted OR [95% CI]=1.63 [1.17–2.27] and 1.55 [1.14–2.11], respectively) and who received education on HIV/AIDS and sexual matters at school (adjusted OR [95% CI]=1.59 [1.22–2.08]). The females were less likely to have comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge compared to males (adjusted OR and [95% CI]=0.60 [0.49–0.75]). Conclusions: In general, only about a quarter of in-school adolescents had comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge. Although the female adolescents are highly vulnerable to HIV infection and its effects, they were by far less likely to have comprehensive HIV/AIDS knowledge. HIV/AIDS information, education and communication activities need to be intensified in high schools.
Coffee Wilt Disease (Gibberella xylarioides Heim and Saccas) in Forest Coffee Systems of Southwest and Southeast Ethiopia
Sihen Getachew,Girma Adugna,Fikre Lemessa,H. Hindorf
Plant Pathology Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Coffee diseases are presumed to be less important in the forest coffee as compared to the garden and plantation systems of coffee production in Ethiopia. In this article, the results of a study conducted on the occurrence and incidence of Coffee Wilt Disease (CWD) and the major factors influencing the disease in four major forests coffee sites in southwest and southeast Ethiopia are discussed. In each forest coffee site, coffee wilt syndrome was assessed in three systematically selected sample plots during dry and wet seasons of 2008 and 2009. Concurrently, three to four samples of infected coffee trees were randomly collected from each plot and the causal pathogen was isolated and identified in the laboratory. The result indicted that CWD was prevalent in the four forest coffee sites, with mean incidence of 27.1 and 29.2% in Harenna during 2008 and 2009 wet seasons, respectively, followed by Berhane-Kontir with mean incidences of 22.1 (2008) and 27.7% (2009). Whereas, Bonga and Yayu forest coffees had comparatively low wilt severity (<10%). The wood samples of most of the infected coffee trees (90.6%) yielded Gibberella xylarioides in the laboratory proving that this pathogen is the main cause of coffee tree death in the forest. The difference in incidence of CWD across the four sites and among fields was strongly associated with human factors and variations in coffee populations. The forest coffee trees in Harenna and Berhane-Kontir (high CWD) are almost transformed to semiforest type by sub-planting coffee seedlings after thinning the dense vegetation cover. These activities are known to create wound to the host and disseminate the fungus spores from tree to tree and from one field to the other. The two independent seedling inoculation tests in the greenhouse evidenced that there were significant variations among coffee accessions in reactions to CWD though most accessions were susceptible. The study showed that CWD is one of the potential biotic factors threatening the genetic diversity of Arabica coffee in most forest coffee sites and thus the disease management practices should duly be considered in planning and implementing forest coffee conservation strategy.
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