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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 25337 matches for " Lee Calvert "
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Shine on: Review of Laser- and Light-Based Therapies for the Treatment of Burn Scars
C. Scott Hultman,Renee E. Edkins,Clara N. Lee,Catherine T. Calvert,Bruce A. Cairns
Dermatology Research and Practice , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/243651
Abstract: Restoration of form and function after burn injury remains challenging, but emerging laser and pulsed light technologies now offer hope for patients with hypertrophic scars, which may be associated with persistent hyperemia, chronic folliculitis, intense pruritis, and neuropathic pain. In addition to impairing body image, these scars may limit functional recovery, compromise activities of daily living, and prevent return to work. Three different platforms are now poised to alter our reconstructive algorithm: (1) vascular-specific pulsed dye laser (PDL) to reduce hyperemia, (2) ablative fractional CO2 laser to improve texture and pliability of the burn scar, and (3) intense pulsed light (IPL) to correct burn scar dyschromia and alleviate chronic folliculitis. In this paper, we will provide an overview of our work in this area, which includes a systematic review, a retrospective analysis of our preliminary experience, and interim data from our on-going, prospective, before-after cohort trial. We will demonstrate that laser- and light-based therapies can be combined with each other safely to yield superior results, often at lower cost, by reducing the need for reconstructive surgery. Modulating the burn scar, through minimally invasive modalities, may replace conventional methods of burn scar excision and yield outcomes not previously possible or conceivable. “Remember when you were young, you shone like the sun.” Roger Waters 1. Background Restoration of form and function after burn injury remains challenging, but traditional and emerging laser- and light-based technologies may offer new hope for patients with burn scars. In addition to serving as a visible reminder of the burn injury and compromising self-esteem and self-image, burn scars produce considerable functional morbidity, including contractures, hypertrophic changes, and keloid formation. Furthermore, burn scars often result in persistent hyperemia, chronic folliculitis, intense and unrelenting pruritis, and neuropathic pain. The loss of sweat glands, hair follicles, and melanocytes compromises the ability of skin, the body’s largest organ, to provide thermoregulation, to resist mechanical trauma, and to protect from UV radiation. The stigmata of burn scars are plainly visible, but the injury to the patient is often more than skin deep. Depending upon the constellation of patient symptoms and functional deficits, treatment of the burn scar involves a number of modalities [1], which may include massage and moisturizing agents, pressure garments, silicone sheeting, topical and intralesional
Qualitative research across boundaries of language: the representation of lived experiences.
G Calvert
South African Family Practice , 2003,
Abstract: Background: Qualitative methodology has a growing importance in primary care research, reflected in projects submitted for the degree of MFamMed at The Medical University of Southern Africa (Medunsa). These projects were completed in multilingual settings and sought highly subjective information. This paper aimed to demonstrate how researchers handled issues of language within their work. Methods: All dissertations successfully submitted for the degree of MFamMed at Medunsa between 1993 and 2000 were examined. Those using a predominantly qualitative methodology were subject to content analysis. Results: Researchers acknowledged issues of language and developed a range of strategies to ensure the faithful representation of their subjects' beliefs and attitudes in the language of the final dissertation. Conclusions: Working across boundaries of language presents a potential threat to the faithful representation of qualitative data. Examination of these examples of qualitative research point to some ways in which loss of meaning may be minimised. The paper calls for a close examination of issues of language in research of this nature.
Review of Gender, Health and Information Technology in Context. Edited by Ellen Balka, Eileen Green, and Flis Henwood.
Scout Calvert
International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract:
Wardrop equilibria in an infinite network
Bruce Calvert
Le Matematiche , 2000,
Abstract: In a finite network, there is a classical theory of traffic flow, which gives existence of a Wardrop equilibrium for given OD demands and affine route costs. In this note, the existence theory is extended to infinite networks.
Deakin University: Going online at a Dual Mode University
Jocelyn Calvert
International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning , 2001,
Abstract: Deakin is a dual mode university with more than half of its students doing at least part of their study at a distance and with an entrepreneurial arm that provides distance education services for even larger numbers. Online provision has been developing over a decade, enriching traditional distance education in programs with mixtures of on- and off-campus students. It has been supported by central services and corporate applications, leading to reasonable consistency in the thrust. A current aim is to ensure that it is sustainable at a high level of quality.
The Isomorphism Problem for Computable Abelian p-Groups of Bounded Length
Wesley Calvert
Mathematics , 2004,
Abstract: Theories of classification distinguish classes with some good structure theorem from those for which none is possible. Some classes (dense linear orders, for instance) are non-classifiable in general, but are classifiable when we consider only countable members. This paper explores such a notion for classes of computable structures by working out a sequence of examples. We follow recent work by Goncharov and Knight in using the degree of the isomorphism problem for a class to distinguish classifiable classes from non-classifiable. In this paper, we calculate the degree of the isomorphism problem for Abelian $p$-groups of bounded Ulm length. The result is a sequence of classes whose isomorphism problems are cofinal in the hyperarithmetical hierarchy. In the process, new back-and-forth relations on such groups are calculated.
Metric Structures and Probabilistic Computation
Wesley Calvert
Mathematics , 2008,
Abstract: Continuous first-order logic is used to apply model-theoretic analysis to analytic structures (e.g. Hilbert spaces, Banach spaces, probability spaces, etc.). Classical computable model theory is used to examine the algorithmic structure of mathematical objects that can be described in classical first-order logic. The present paper shows that probabilistic computation (sometimes called randomized computation) can play an analogous role for structures described in continuous first-order logic. The main result of this paper is an effective completeness theorem, showing that every decidable continuous first-order theory has a probabilistically decidable model. Later sections give examples of the application of this framework to various classes of structures, and to some problems of computational complexity theory.
The isomorphism problem for classes of computable fields
Wesley Calvert
Mathematics , 2002,
Abstract: Theories of classification distinguish classes with some good structure theorem from those for which none is possible. Some classes (dense linear orders, for instance) are non-classifiable in general, but are classifiable when we consider only countable members. This paper explores such a notion for classes of computable structures by working out several examples. One motivation is to see whether some classes whose set of countable models is very complex become classifiable when we consider only computable members. We follow recent work by Goncharov and Knight in using the degree of the isomorphism problem for a class to distinguish classifiable classes from non- classifiable. For some classes (undirected graphs, fields of fixed characteristic, and real closed fields) we show that the isomorphism problem is \Sigma^1_1 complete (the maximum possible), and for others it is of relatively low complexity. For instance, for algebraically closed fields, archimedean real closed fields, and vector spaces, we show that the isomorphism problem is \Pi^0_3 complete.
Three notions of effective computation on $\mathbb{R}$
Wesley Calvert
Mathematics , 2008,
Abstract: We compare three notions of effectiveness on uncountable structures. The first notion is that of a $\real$-computable structure, based on a model of computation proposed by Blum, Shub, and Smale, which uses full-precision real arithmetic. The second notion is that of an $F$-parameterizable structure, defined by Morozov and based on Mal'tsev's notion of a constructive structure. The third is $\Sigma$-definability over $HF(\real)$, defined by Ershov as a generalization of the observation that the computably enumerable sets are exactly those $\Sigma_1$-definable in $HF(\mathbb{N})$. We show that every $\real$-computable structure has an $F$-parameterization, but that the expansion of the real field by the exponential function is $F$-parameterizable but not $\real$-computable. We also show that the structures with $\real$-computable copies are exactly the structures with copies $\Sigma$-definable over $HF(\real)$. One consequence of this equivalence is a method of approximating certain $\real$-computable structures by Turing computable structures.
Effective completeness for real computation
Wesley Calvert
Mathematics , 2008,
Abstract: The main result of this paper, as previously presented to arxiv, was incorrect. See the full text for details and for reference to the remaining results.
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