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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 883 matches for " Lavano SM "
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Ziconotide in severe, drug-resistant cancer pain. Preliminary experience
A. Lavano
Pathos : Trimestrale di Algologia , 2008,
Abstract: The Author reports the case of ziconotide intrathecal treatment in three terminal cancer patients, with nociceptive and neuropathic pain, unresponsive to the treatment with intrathecal opioid and adjuvant drugs.An external pump for continuous subarachnoid infusion was implanted to the three patients. The initial dose was 2,4 mcg/die, with increments of 1,2 mcg/die every three days till the maximum dose of 4,8 mcg/die in two patients (survival 61 and 45 days) and 7,2 mcg/die in a patient (survival 52 days). VAS reduction was 50% in the first patient, of 57% in the second one and 70% in the third one.In one case, at the dose of 4,8 mcg/die, the treatment was associated with important collateral effects, that requested the temporary suspension of the drug.
Maternal stress and childhood migraine: a new perspective on management
Esposito M, Gallai B, Parisi L, Roccella M, Marotta R, Lavano SM, Gritti A, Mazzotta G, Carotenuto M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S42818
Abstract: ternal stress and childhood migraine: a new perspective on management Original Research (436) Total Article Views Authors: Esposito M, Gallai B, Parisi L, Roccella M, Marotta R, Lavano SM, Gritti A, Mazzotta G, Carotenuto M Published Date March 2013 Volume 2013:9 Pages 351 - 355 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S42818 Received: 16 January 2013 Accepted: 31 January 2013 Published: 06 March 2013 Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Antonella Gritti,5 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Marco Carotenuto1 1Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical, and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 5Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Naples, 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Sanitaria Locale 4, Terni, Italy Background: Migraine without aura is a primary headache which is frequent and disabling in the developmental age group. No reports are available concerning the prevalence and impact of migraine in children on the degree of stress experienced by parents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of maternal stress in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by migraine without aura. Methods: The study population consisted of 218 children (112 boys, 106 girls) of mean age 8.32 ± 2.06 (range 6–13) years suffering from migraine without aura and a control group of 405 typical developing children (207 boys, 198 girls) of mean age 8.54 ± 2.47 years. Mothers of children in each group answered the Parent Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) questionnaire to assess parental stress levels. Results: The two groups were matched for age (P = 0.262), gender (P = 0.983), and body mass index adjusted for age (P = 0.106). Mothers of children with migraine without aura reported higher mean PSI-SF scores related to the Parental Distress domain (P < 0.001), Dysfunctional Parent-Child Interaction domain (P < 0.001), Difficult Child subscale (P < 0.001), and Total Stress domain than mothers of controls (P < 0.001). No differences between the two groups were found for Defensive Responding subscale scores. Conclusion: Our study may be the first to highlight the presence of high levels of stress in parents of children affected by migraine without aura.
Can headache impair intellectual abilities in children? An observational study
Esposito M, Pascotto A, Gallai B, Parisi L, Roccella M, Marotta R, Lavano SM, Gritti A, Mazzotta G, Carotenuto M
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S36863
Abstract: n headache impair intellectual abilities in children? An observational study Original Research (2413) Total Article Views Authors: Esposito M, Pascotto A, Gallai B, Parisi L, Roccella M, Marotta R, Lavano SM, Gritti A, Mazzotta G, Carotenuto M Published Date November 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 509 - 513 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S36863 Received: 10 August 2012 Accepted: 25 September 2012 Published: 01 November 2012 Maria Esposito,1 Antonio Pascotto,1 Beatrice Gallai,3 Lucia Parisi,2 Michele Roccella,2 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Antonella Gritti,5 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Marco Carotenuto1 1Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 4Department of Psychiatry, “Magna Graecia” University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 5Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Napoli, 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Sanitaria Locale 4, Terni, Italy Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the cognitive functioning of children affected by headache, pinpointing the differences in intelligence style between subjects affected by migraine without aura and subjects with tension-type headache. Methods: The study population consisted of 147 children (mean age 10.82 ± 2.17 years) with headache, recruited from the Headache Center for Developmental Age, Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry Clinic, Second University of Naples. Cognitive profiling was performed using Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children Third Edition throughout the sample. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria for pediatric age, subjects were divided into a migraine without aura group (n = 75; 43 boys, 32 girls) and a tension-type headache group (n = 72; 49 boys, 23 girls). The results were compared with the findings obtained from a sample of 137 healthy control subjects recruited from schools in the Campania region, matched for age and gender. Results: No difference in full intelligence quotient was found between the groups, but the children with tension-type headache had a lower verbal intelligence quotient and a higher performance intelligence quotient than the healthy controls and children with migraine. Factor analysis data showed that the children with migraine seemed to have lower perceptual organization than the children affected by tension-type headache. Conclusion: To our knowledge, studies on cognitive functioning in children affected by headache in the interictal phase are scarce, and our results suggest a new perspective in understanding of the neuropsychological aspects of young patients affected by headaches.
Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease
Marisa De Rose,Giusy Guzzi,Domenico Bosco,Mary Romano,Serena Marianna Lavano,Massimiliano Plastino,Giorgio Volpentesta,Rosa Marotta,Angelo Lavano
Neurology Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/502096
Abstract: Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred. 1. Introduction Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents the gold standard for surgical treatment in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), but unfortunately it is not fully effective in controlling each motor sign, and adverse effects are common. However, DBS cannot be always proposed to all PD patients because very often do not fill into the inclusion criteria for this procedure. Recently, other minimal invasive neuromodulation procedures with low morbidity-mortality and more suitable for cases excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS could be considered. Among these, motor cortex stimulation (MCS) may be one of the new opportunities [1–4] first introduced by Canavero back in 2000. In 2003, Pagni et al. spearheaded an Italian Multicenter Study on 41 PD patients treated with extradural MCS and long-term results have been reported in 2008 [5]. He showed that any symptom was modulated by MCS without a clear predictability. Thereafter, Pagni found a statistically significant improvement on the UDPRS III at 1, 3, and 6 months with a trend back to baseline, thereafter, and L-dopa-induced dyskinesias; painful dystonia and motor fluctuations were satisfactorily controlled. Other small case series of PD patients treated with
How long does it take to become a competent mammographer?
SM Naylor
Breast Cancer Research , 2000, DOI: 10.1186/bcr214
Abstract: The mean number of mammograms taken was 322 (range 250-770); the mean number of weeks was 34 (16-54); the number of weeks for those with no experience was 35 (16-54), for those with limited experience was 35 (19-49) and for an experienced individual was 34 (16-44). The number of mammograms for those with no experience was 385 (253-770), for those with limited experience was 308 (250-551) and for an experienced individual was 292 (251-350). The number of weeks for a trainee participating in breast screening was 32 (16-54) and for those performing symptomatic mammograms only 35.5 (26-49). The number of mammograms for screening was 352 (250-770) and for symptomatic alone was 281 (251-350).The average time taken to reach the required standard to gain the Certificate of Competence in Mammography is not dependent on the previous experience in mammography. However, the number of mammograms taken before the standard is reached may be less the greater the previous experience. The type of work undertaken during the training bears little relevance to the number of weeks taken to accreditation. The number of mammograms taken during the period of training was greater for the individuals working in a screening unit.
Individual growth of Heleobia piscium in natural populations (Gastropoda: Cochliopidae) from the multiple use natural Reserve Isla Martin Garcia, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Martin, SM.;
Brazilian Journal of Biology , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1519-69842008000300020
Abstract: the present work analyses the individual growth of heleobia piscium in natural conditions in coastal drainage channels of the multiple use natural reserve isla martín garcía, buenos aires, argentina. isla martín garcía is located in the upper río de la plata, to the south of the mouth of the uruguay river (34° 11' 25" s and 58° 15' 38" w). monthly collections were made from july 2005 to july 2006 in the eastern part of the island (arena beach). the population of h. piscium showed a complex and dynamic structure of sizes during a long period of the annual cycle. two cohorts could be detected. the bertalanffy growth equation was: lt = 6 (1-e -1.85 (t+0.38)) and lt = 3.9 (1-e -0.19 (t+4.84)) for cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. the pattern of population growth displayed a staggered model, where the greatest growth is observed during the summer. the reproductive period occurred during six months, from the beginning of summer to middle of fall. based on only one reproductive effort, this pattern is not similar to that of other cogeneric species already studied.
Reforms and Industrial Development and Trade in East Africa: The Case of Tanzania
SM Kapunda
African Journal of International Affairs , 2004,
Abstract: The objective of this discussion is to critically examine the performance of the industrial and trade sectors in the context of the East African Community (EAC). It has been shown that the industrial performance has some direct impact on trade and that Tanzania’s trade shares to EAC are still low. Furthermore, despite the recent impressive performance of the industrial sector, there are traditional and competitive challenges to the sector. The paper therefore concludes by providing policy recommendations.
Simulation par ordinateur de la ligne Haute Tension en régime permanent dans les conditions aléatoires
SM Debbal
Afrique Science: Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie , 2005,
Abstract: Computing simulation of the high voltage line operation during permanent state in random conditions The aim of this work consists of the simulation by computer for the operation of the High Voltage (HV) line and also of the network distribution. This will be done by the establishment of a model which can take account of the energy distribution between the various elements of the HV network under normal and random operation conditions. The results we obtain make it possible to understand and act upon the network operation.This allows an improvement and an optimisation of the energy distribution.
Gender-specific constraints affecting technology use and household food security in western province of Kenya.
SM Mikalitsa
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development , 2010,
Abstract: The factors that hinder farm intensification process among smallholders in Kenya are many and varied. These factors are not gender neutral; they affect the ability of both men and women to achieve greater productivity in agriculture. Lack of farm intensification contributes to stagnation of agriculture, increases poverty and limits rural development. The problems that face women farmers are more distinct due to socio-cultural constraints that affect their access to and control over essential assets necessary for improving their livelihoods and those of their households. Lack of access to and ownership of productive assets is an effect as well as a cause of poverty. The objective of the study was to assess gender specific constraints that affect the impact of farm technologies on household food security among smallholders in Western Province of Kenya. A multi-stage stratified random sampling technique was used to select 499 households. Using a semi-structured questionnaire administered to household heads together with six focus group discussions, the study examined how gender affects the intensity of use of farm technologies such as hybrid seeds, fertilizers, pesticides, animal draught power and storage technologies and impact on household food security. In addition, the study analyzed the effect of the level of education of household head and contact with extension service on maize yield. The results show that lack of access to land, extension services, credit, income and low education level are the most important constraints facing women farmers. While women accessed credit from informal sources such as rotating credit and savings, men accessed credit from banks and cooperatives. Women who accessed credit spent more on farm inputs and consequently they realized higher maize output. The results further showed that access to extension services was a problem to both genders; 21 % of women and 20 % of men had access to extension services - demonstrating the inability of the current extension system to disseminate existing and new technologies to smallholders. Access to formal school-based education and extension service had a large and significant effect on maize yield. Women were further constrained by limited time to perform their roles as well as limited access to technologies. Wives (59%) were more affected by labour changes associated with technology use than husbands (21%). The findings provide useful information to policy makers on how to address the complex issues related to gender, agricultural development and rural poverty.
Beyond the Impasse of African Industrial Development: The Case of Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia
SM Kapunda
Africa Development , 2007,
Abstract: The thrust of this article is to examine critically the importance, performance and under-weighting of the industrial sector in Africa focusing on three countries, Botswana, Tanzania and Zambia, in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. The article shows that both theoretical and empirical evidence indicates somewhat unsatisfactory industrial performance. The article attempts to explain the way forward (beyond the impasse), by providing alternative approaches, opportunities and recommendations.
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