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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2843 matches for " Larissa Kagambéga "
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Use of Vasopressive Amines in a Limited Resource Country  [PDF]
Anna Thiam, Lidwine Alakoua, Géorges Kinda, Aimé Bama, Larissa Kagambéga, Géorges Millogo, Jonas Kologo, Nvalentin Yaméogo, André K. Samandoulougou, Patrice Zabsonré
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1104064
Abstract:
Introduction: Vasopressive amines are frequently used in cardioology. The aim of our work was to evaluate the practical modalities of use of amines in the cardiology department of University Hospital Yalgado Ouédraogo. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study for 6 months, from 01 June to 31 November 2013, including all patients treated with vasopressive amines. We were interested in the different clinical pictures, the indications, the choice of amines, and the practical application of the treatment. Results: Fifty patients were included in the study; the mean age was 58 ± 17.6. The sex ratio was 0.85. Hypertensive heart disease was the underlying cardiac disease in 34% of cases. A known chronic heart failure was observed in 62% of cases. Clinical admission tables were dominated by overall heart failure (74%). Vascular collapse (38%) and shock (36%) were the main indications of treatment. Severe alterations in left ventricular systolic function were found in 74% of cases. Dobutamine was the amine of choice (90%). The average time to start treatment was 96.32 minutes (range 15-660 minutes). The time to relay between syringes was more than ten minutes in 72% of the cases, and the nurses’ unavailability was the main cause. Monitoring was manual in almost all cases. The average duration of treatment was 6.64 days. Treatment-related incidents were observed in 26% of cases. The intra-hospital mortality of patients with amines was 48%. Conclusion: The indications of vasopressive amines in the cardiology department are close to the international recommendations. But this treatment suffers in its practical application. The duration of treatment remains excessive but is explained by the lack of therapeutic alternative.
Cardiologic Medical Evacuations in Burkina Faso: Contribution of Three Philanthropic Sponsors over a 10-Year Period  [PDF]
Koudougou Jonas Kologo, Georges Rosario Christian Millogo, Georges Kinda, Jean Baptiste Tougma, Nobila Valentin Yaméogo, Anna Thiam Tall, Larissa Kagambéga, Caleb Tindano, Eulalie Lingani, Mireille Simo-Moyo, Relwendé Aristide Yaméogo, Andre Koudougou Samadoulougou, Patrice Zabsonré
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1103380
Abstract:
Introduction: This study aimed at describing the socio-economic, diagnostic, and progressive features of patients evacuated thanks to philanthropic sponsors. Patients and methods: all evacuated patients, contacted through the phone and interviewed, were included in the study. A questionnaire helped in collecting data which were analyzed through the software Epi-Info (version 7). Outcomes: A total of 63 patients out of 134 were included in the study among which there are 22 adults and 41 children. The sex-ratio was 1.30. Patients living in Ouagadougou accounted for 79% of cases. The children’s average age at evacuation was 3.58 ± 3.86 years against 27.52 ± 12.54 years for adults. Ventricular septal defects among children (58.53%) and mitral valve diseases among adults (72.72%) were the main diagnoses at the time of evacuation. The average fall was 47 months for children, and 54 months for adults in the post-operative period. 68% of adults had an income below 50,000 FCFA per month. The evacuation average cost was estimated at 21,083,000 FCFA per patient, corresponding to 2,825,122,000 FCA over 10 years. Each adult patient spent an average of 15,000 FCFA per month for the follow up, against 8725 FCFA for children. 16% of patients were lost of sight in the post-operative. Conclusion: Philanthropic sponsors significantly contribute to the management of cardiac patients, and their efforts should be supported by a better monitoring. Setting-up cardiac surgery and interventional cardiology in Burkina Faso are required to address these health shortcomings.
Eukaryotic Protein Kinases (ePKs) of the Helminth Parasite Schistosoma mansoni
Luiza F Andrade, Laila A Nahum, Lívia GA Avelar, Larissa L Silva, Adhemar Zerlotini, Jer?nimo C Ruiz, Guilherme Oliveira
BMC Genomics , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-12-215
Abstract: We have identified 252 ePKs, which corresponds to 1.9% of the S. mansoni predicted proteome, through sequence similarity searches using HMMs (Hidden Markov Models). Amino acid sequences corresponding to the conserved catalytic domain of ePKs were aligned by MAFFT and further used in distance-based phylogenetic analysis as implemented in PHYLIP. Our analysis also included the ePK homologs from six other eukaryotes. The results show that S. mansoni has proteins in all ePK groups. Most of them are clearly clustered with known ePKs in other eukaryotes according to the phylogenetic analysis. None of the ePKs are exclusively found in S. mansoni or belong to an expanded family in this parasite. Only 16 S. mansoni ePKs were experimentally studied, 12 proteins are predicted to be catalytically inactive and approximately 2% of the parasite ePKs remain unclassified. Some proteins were mentioned as good target for drug development since they have a predicted essential function for the parasite.Our approach has improved the functional annotation of 40% of S. mansoni ePKs through combined similarity and phylogenetic-based approaches. As we continue this work, we will highlight the biochemical and physiological adaptations of S. mansoni in response to diverse environments during the parasite development, vector interaction, and host infection.Human schistosomiasis caused by blood fluke parasites of Schistosoma genus, remains an important parasitic disease and a major health economic problem in many tropical and subtropical countries. Schistosomes have a complex life cycle that includes six different stages (cercariae, schistosomula, adult worms - male and female, egg, miracidia and sporocyst) in different environments: water, definitive host (mammals) and intermediate host (snail). During parasite development, signals from the environment are sensed and stimulate physiological, morphological and, biochemical adaptations. Oils are shown to stimulate cercarial penetration; hormones
Optimal Endogenous Tariffs with Implicit Campaign Contributions  [PDF]
Ga?l Lagadec
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2014.44040
Abstract:

This article proposes a model of endogenous protection by integrating informed and non-informed voters in the population. The model also distinguishes between interest groups and pressure groups, by considering that the members of one interest group do not necessarily organize as a pressure group (lobby). The endogenous tariff stemming from the model is an increasing function of the relative influence of the lobby, and the aforementioned function itself increases in accordance with the part of non-informed voters. This framework avoids formalizing contributions. It also permits to show that the conditions of the lobbying’s efficiency depend on the nature of the free rider comportment of the interest group members.

Grounding the Human Body Improves Facial Blood Flow Regulation: Results of a Randomized, Placebo Controlled Pilot Study  [PDF]
Gaétan Chevalier
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications (JCDSA) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2014.45039
Abstract:

Earthing (grounding) refers to bringing the human body in direct contact with the negative electric charge of the earth’s surface by barefoot exposure outdoors or using special conductive indoor systems that are connected to the Earth. To determine if earthing improves facial blood circulation/flow, a double-blind study was designed with forty subjects either grounded or sham-grounded (27 grounded subjects and 13 sham-grounded subjects acting as controls) for at least one hour in a comfortable recliner chair equipped with conductive mat, pillow, and patches. The grounding systems were either grounded or sham-grounded via a wire to the ground port (third hole) of a power outlet. A Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging camera was used to continuously record changes in facial blood flow non-invasively. Facial blood flow regulation clearly improved among grounded— but not sham-grounded—subjects. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that even one-hour contact with the earth restores blood flow regulation to the face suggesting enhanced skin tissue repair and improved facial appearance with possible implications for overall health. Further studies, using larger comparison groups, longer monitoring times, and more measuring methods, are warranted in order to confirm the novel influence of the Earth as a protector of skin health and appearance.

Participatory Teaching and Happiness in Developed Nations  [PDF]
Ga?l Brulé
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2014.411028
Abstract: Average happiness differs considerably across nations. Much of this difference is in societal development, but average happiness differs also among developed nations. Much of that latter difference seems to be due to cultural factors and education is a main carrier of these. In that context we explored the effect of teaching styles on happiness. In a first study on the general public in 37 developed nations we found that people feel happier in the nations where participatory teaching prevailed. Much of this difference can be explained by the effect of teaching style on psychological autonomy. Participatory teaching fosters autonomy and autonomy adds to happiness. In a second study among high school pupils we found no correlation between average happiness and dominant teaching style in the nation, which fits the explanation that the effect of participatory teaching is in personality formation, with the consequences for happiness of which manifest in adulthood.
The Effects of Neurofeedback Training on Memory Performance in Elderly Subjects  [PDF]
Ga?l Lecomte, Jacques Juhel
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2011.28129
Abstract: Neurofeedback or electroencephalographic operant conditioning (EEG-OC) is an EEG biofeedback technique used to train individuals to control or modify their cortical activity through learned self-regulation. Initially used for treating a variety of pathologies, neurofeedback has been employed more recently to improve the physical or cognitive performance of human beings. The purpose of this study is to assess the hypothesis of the effect of neurofeedback (the ‘awakened mind’ model) on the memory performance of subjects aged over 65. 30 participants were shared equally between 3 groups: an experimental group that underwent 4 neurofeedback training sessions; a non-neurofeedback group trained at relaxation; and a ‘waiting list’ control group. Results showed that the members of the Neurofeedback group learned to increase the spectral power of the alpha frequency range as well as the alpha/thêta ratio, and that compared with the members of the two other groups, neurofeedback training resulted in a more pronounced decrease, albeit without any relation to changes in EEG activity and the level of stress and anxiety of participants undergoing such training. Yet contrary to expectations, no improvement of memory performance (differed recall of words and learning of lists of words) was observed. These mixed results, which suggest a wide range of applications, underline the need for a more systematic assessment of the potential applications of NFB training in elderly humans in order to be better able to specify the effects of the retained protocol on cognitive performance.
Average Happiness and Dominant Family Type in Regions in Western Europe around 2000  [PDF]
Ga?l Brulé, Ruut Veenhoven
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2014.412031
Abstract: Research on the relation between family and happiness has focused on the micro level and considered the effects of an individual’s place in the family system, such as whether or not one is married and exchange of support with kin. Macro level differences in the family system as such have received little attention as yet. In this paper we consider regional differences in family types in Europe and explore the relationship with average happiness. Data on dominant family type in regions are taken from Todd (1990), who distinguishes five family types: 1) absolute nuclear; 2) egalitarian nuclear; 3) communitarian; 4) stem family; and 5) incomplete stem family. Data on average happiness in regions are taken from the Eurobarometer surveys. Average happiness appears to be highest in regions where family pattern of “absolute nuclear” prevails and lowest in the regions where “egalitarian nuclear” family dominates. Control for economic prosperity in regions does not change this picture. A possible interpretation of these findings is that freedom adds more to happiness than equality does. It is not true for types of freedom. If horizontal freedom (intragenerational freedom) seems to be important in terms of well-being, the results are much less convincing as far as vertical freedom (intergenerational freedom) is concerned. The findings might have some far reach contribution in the field of family policy.
Grounding the Human Body during Yoga Exercise with a Grounded Yoga Mat Reduces Blood Viscosity  [PDF]
Richard Brown, Gaétan Chevalier
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2015.54019
Abstract: Objective: Research continues to show that being connected to the earth can increase the potential of the body to scavenge free radicals. This study examined the effect of just one hour of grounding on blood viscosity while subjects participated in gentle yoga exercises designed to initiate minor inflammation. Design: In this double blind model, twenty-eight (28) subjects met at the Bowerman Sports Medicine Clinic on the campus of the University of Oregon and were grounded to the earth via contact with a grounded yoga mat or were sham-grounded. Ten yoga exercises were repeated five times over a one-hour period. Blood was taken pre and post exercise and analyzed for blood viscosity using a scanning capillary viscometer. Results: Subjects connected to the earth significantly reduced their post exercise systolic blood viscosity (p = 0.03) and diastolic blood viscosity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Grounding has the ability to affect exercise induced inflammation, thereby reducing blood viscosity.
Os trópicos na rota do Império britanico: a vis?o de Mungo Park sobre a áfrica em fins do século XVIII
Viana, Larissa;
História, Ciências, Saúde-Manguinhos , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0104-59702011000100003
Abstract: the young scottish physician mungo park, aged 23, arrived in africa in 1795 with a mission as specific as it was complex in those bygone days, namely to travel the entire length of the river niger. in 1799, the story of this journey was published in a book that sold 1500 copies in the first month alone, with two further editions published that same year, as well as the translation of the work into french and german the following year. in this article, the narrative of mungo park is examined by taking due consideration of the relationship between the tropics, science and travel in the early days of british expansionism into the heart of africa.
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