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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 79 matches for " Kyriaki Michailiou "
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Optimizing Forest Sampling by Using Lagrange Multipliers  [PDF]
Kyriaki Kitikidou
American Journal of Operations Research (AJOR) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajor.2012.21011
Abstract: In two-phase sampling, or double sampling, from a population with size N we take one, relatively large, sample size n. From this relatively large sample we take a small sub-sample size m, which usually costs more per sample unit than the first one. In double sampling with regression estimators, the sample of the first phase n is used for the estimation of the average of an auxiliary variable X, which should be strongly related to the main variable Y (which is estimated from the sub-sample m). Sampling optimization can be achieved by minimizing cost C with fixed var Y, or by finding a minimum var Y for fixed C. In this paper we optimize sampling with use of Lagrange multipliers, either by minimizing variance of Y and having predetermined cost, or by minimizing cost and having predetermined variance of Y.
Evaluating Genome-Wide Association Study-Identified Breast Cancer Risk Variants in African-American Women
Jirong Long, Ben Zhang, Lisa B. Signorello, Qiuyin Cai, Sandra Deming-Halverson, Martha J. Shrubsole, Maureen Sanderson, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailiou, Douglas F. Easton, Xiao-Ou Shu, William J. Blot, Wei Zheng
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058350
Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS), conducted mostly in European or Asian descendants, have identified approximately 67 genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Given the large differences in genetic architecture between the African-ancestry genome and genomes of Asians and Europeans, it is important to investigate these loci in African-ancestry populations. We evaluated index SNPs in all 67 breast cancer susceptibility loci identified to date in our study including up to 3,300 African-American women (1,231 cases and 2,069 controls), recruited in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS) and the Nashville Breast Health Study (NBHS). Seven SNPs were statistically significant (P≤0.05) with the risk of overall breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported: rs10069690 (5p15/TERT), rs999737 (14q24/RAD51L1), rs13387042 (2q35/TNP1), rs1219648 (10q26/FGFR2), rs8170 (19p13/BABAM1), rs17817449 (16q12/FTO), and rs13329835 (16q23/DYL2). A marginally significant association (P<0.10) was found for three additional SNPs: rs1045485 (2q33/CASP8), rs4849887 (2q14/INHBB), and rs4808801 (19p13/ELL). Three additional SNPs, including rs1011970 (9p21/CDKN2A/2B), rs941764 (14q32/CCDC88C), and rs17529111 (6q14/FAM46A), showed a significant association in analyses conducted by breast cancer subtype. The risk of breast cancer was elevated with an increasing number of risk variants, as measured by quintile of the genetic risk score, from 1.00 (reference), to 1.75 (1.30–2.37), 1.56 (1.15–2.11), 2.02 (1.50–2.74) and 2.63 (1.96–3.52), respectively, (P = 7.8×10–10). Results from this study highlight the need for large genetic studies in AAs to identify risk variants impacting this population.
Machiavellianism in Universities: Perceiving Exploitation in Student Networks  [PDF]
Alexandra Bekiari, Kyriaki Spanou
Social Networking (SN) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/sn.2018.71002
Abstract:
Aim of this article is to examine parameters and types of Machiavellian behavior among students in selected departments. Social network analysis, bivariate analysis and principal component analysis have been implemented. A total sample of 27 students of Business Administration dept. (Thessaly University of Applied Sciences), 63 students of Veterinary dept. and 57 students of Physical Education dept. (University of Thessaly) has been analyzed. Selected results: Male students tend to regard more students as Machiavellians. Female students seem to be more willing to harm others. Male ones are more willing to exploit weaknesses. Tall or heavy students are regarded as quite Machiavellians. Students of urban origin or rich enough seem to adopt a relatively innocent view. Using internet is regarded as an evidence of Machiavellianism. To select friends by appreciating their knowledge capacity is considered to be unrelated to Machiavellianism. Two types of students who are targeted for Machiavellian practices are demarcated: a) “full target” and b) “beneficial target”. Two types of Machiavellian students appear: a) “full Machiavellian” and b) “ruthless”. A mixed typology of victims and Machiavellians reveals: a) a “targeting and targeted” type, b) a “full target”, c) a “beneficial target” and d) a “ruthless”. In general, the Machiavellianism seems to be either a generalized strategy or a quite specific one.
Mental Health Apps: Innovations, Risks and Ethical Considerations  [PDF]
Kyriaki G. Giota, George Kleftaras
E-Health Telecommunication Systems and Networks (ETSN) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/etsn.2014.33003
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to briefly review some of the innovations that mobile mental health apps present to consumers and mental health practitioners. Particular attention was given to understanding some of the important risks and the potential ethical dilemmas which may arise for counselors and psychologists who embrace them in their practice. Key considerations of issues pertinent to regulations, privacy concerns, and research are being discussed.
The Limits of EU Conditionality: Minority Rights in Slovakia
Kyriaki Topidi
Journal on Ethnopolitics and Minority Issues in Europe , 2003,
Abstract: This article discusses the impact of EU conditionality on minority rights in Slovakia from a legal point of view. The study of the Slovak case demonstrates the visibility and degree of the EU's contribution to the stabilization of the rule of law, democracy and the creation of legislation on the protection of ethnic minorities in one of the most complex of transition states. At the same time, the article argues that despite the propagation of some ambitious laws in Slovakia, the EU's contribution has had a limited effect on shaping the attitude of Slovak society towards minority rights. Both the formulation of 'recommendations' and criticisms by the EU and the 'responses' emanating from Slovakia, in terms of norms and policy, are examined, leading the author to conclude that the role of the EU in monitoring Slovakia's performance in protecting minority rights has suffered both from an unclear strategy and structural deficiencies, which have subsequently become embedded in Slovakia's domestic legal profile on minority issues.
Ultrasonic Corrosion-Anodization: Electrochemical Cell Design and Process Range Testing  [PDF]
Kyriakos Roushia, Kyriaki Polychronopoulou, Charalambos C. Doumanidis
Journal of Surface Engineered Materials and Advanced Technology (JSEMAT) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jsemat.2012.21001
Abstract: Titanium was used in the present work as the test metal for the first ultrasonic corrosion anodization (UCA) study, because of its important photonics and biomedical applications. The electrochemical cell design was implemented and tested under various experimental conditions combinations (e.g. electrolyte concentration, duration, temperature, ultra-sound presence or absence, oxygen presence, etc) in order to investigate the effect of those parameters in the cracks propagation in Ti-foils. It was found that an increase of cracks takes place when oxygen is provided in the electrolyte solution and when ultrasound is applied. The results presented in the current study could be exploitable towards design of materials having dendritic morphologies, applicable in a wide range of processes from photovoltaics to biocompatible materials.
Dynamic Linkages between Health and Wealth in the European Union  [PDF]
George Konteos, Constantinos Katrakilidis, Kyriaki Sotiriadou
Theoretical Economics Letters (TEL) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/tel.2018.84048
Abstract: The relationship of health and wealth has been for long the subject of academic research as well as a hot policy issue. In this paper we examine this relationship using data on infant mortality rate and real GDP per capita for the 28 European Union countries over the period 1960-2012. The long-run and short run dynamics of the relationship are examined through panel co-integration tests, error correction models and Granger causality tests. The empirical analysis reveals the existence of a long-run negative relationship between GDP and infant mortality. In the short-run there are bidirectional causal effects between the two variables. In summary, the two variables affect each other in a spiral way.
Predictive Features of Persistent Activity Emergence in Regular Spiking and Intrinsic Bursting Model Neurons
Kyriaki Sidiropoulou,Panayiota Poirazi
PLOS Computational Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002489
Abstract: Proper functioning of working memory involves the expression of stimulus-selective persistent activity in pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which refers to neural activity that persists for seconds beyond the end of the stimulus. The mechanisms which PFC pyramidal neurons use to discriminate between preferred vs. neutral inputs at the cellular level are largely unknown. Moreover, the presence of pyramidal cell subtypes with different firing patterns, such as regular spiking and intrinsic bursting, raises the question as to what their distinct role might be in persistent firing in the PFC. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. We identify synaptic location within the basal dendrites as a feature of stimulus selectivity. Specifically, persistent activity-inducing stimuli consist of activated synapses that are located more distally from the soma compared to non-inducing stimuli, in both model cells. In addition, the action potential (AP) latency and the first few inter-spike-intervals of the neuronal response can be used to reliably detect inducing vs. non-inducing inputs, suggesting a potential mechanism by which downstream neurons can rapidly decode the upcoming emergence of persistent activity. While the two model neurons did not differ in the coding features of persistent activity emergence, the properties of persistent activity, such as the firing pattern and the duration of temporally-restricted persistent activity were distinct. Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code for its ability to induce persistent activity and predict differential roles of RS and IB neurons in persistent activity expression.
Environmental Effects on Public Health: An Economic Perspective
Kyriaki Remoundou,Phoebe Koundouri
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2009, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph6082160
Abstract: In this article we critically review the economic literature on the effects of environmental changes on public health, in both the developed and the developing world. We first focus on the economic methodologies that are available for the evaluation of the effects (social costs and benefits) of environmental changes (degradation/preservation) on public health. Then, we explain how the monetary valuations of these effects can feed back in the construction of economic policy for creating agent-specific incentives for more efficient public health management, which is also equitable and environmentally sustainable. Our exposition is accompanied by a synthesis of the available quantitative empirical results.
How the CVT Specialists Working in Centres of Vocational Training Affect the Social Exclusion of People Older than 50 Years Old in Greece?
Kyriaki Papadaki,Argyris Kyridis
International Journal of Education , 2012, DOI: 10.5296/ije.v4i3.2447
Abstract: The changes that took place in the sectors of society and economy worldwide had also an impact on the sector of labour. The group most affected by these changes was elder people [aged 50-65] since they were forced to immediately implement specific societal and cognitive skills. The solution against the problem of the social and employment exclusion has risen from the field of education and vocational training through the planning and materialisation of targeted programmes. The research aims to contribute to the broader social debate of the enhancement of the system of Continuing Vocational Training [CVT] in Greece through the making of contemporary active policies to combat unemployment and social exclusion of the elder people. The chosen group for the research was the CVT Specialists of the Centres for Vocational Training [CVTs] and their relation with the social and employment excluded elder people [aged 50-65]. The current research places itself in the field of Adult Education, and more precisely in Planning, Management and Evaluation of Adult Education Programmes. The methodology used was the quantitative approach, and the formula aiming at the gathering of numerical data was the questionnaire. The main research findings regarding the CVT Specialists self-perception for their profile has shown that their basic studies had not provided them with important help in relation with the position they held. What turned to be really important was the part of working experience. As for the procedure of planning and materialising educational programmes of vocational training on the specified social group of the elder people [aged 50-65], the findings suggested that they didn’t have sufficient knowledge or specified education. Finally, at specific correlations, there were observed some differences on the parts of profile and of planning and materialising, related with age and gender.
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