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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2599 matches for " Kerstin Hoffmann "
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Antithrombin and hypercoagulability in sepsis: insights from thrombelastography?
Johannes N Hoffmann, Kerstin Schick
Critical Care , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/cc5156
Abstract: In a recent paper, Gonano and coworkers [1] reported the potential failure of antithrombin (AT) therapy to modulate hypercoagulability, as evident from TEG measurements. AT constitutes the principal physiological inhibitor of thrombin and of other serine proteases of the clotting cascade, and has been shown to interfere with the clotting process at various sites [2]. AT activity is decreased in patients with trauma, shock and sepsis by virtue of its consumption during complex formation with clotting factors, and by degradation via granulocyte elastase [3]. The first application of AT in a patient with septic shock complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) was described in 1978 [4]. Following this report, many intensive care specialists have also used this natural coagulation inhibitor over more than 25 years to treat coagulopathy in patients with sepsis complicated by DIC. The KyberSept trial investigated the effects of a four-day AT therapy in 2,314 patients with severe sepsis [5]. In this study, AT treated patients did not benefit overall in terms of 28-day and 90-day mortality. In a recent subgroup analysis, however, concomitant heparin application was characterized as the major reason for the failure of the AT treatment; 28-day as well as 90-day mortality were improved in patients not receiving concomitant heparin during the treatment phase [6]. Given that AT was clearly more effective in KyberSept patients with DIC than those without it [7], the characterization of AT's actions on hypercoagulability in sepsis clearly seems to be interesting and important.In a recent issue of Critical Care, Gonano and co-workers [1] analyzed hypercoagulability in a subset of patients in the KyberSept trial by thrombelastography (TEG) and routine coagulation tests. They presented data from 16 placebo and 17 AT treated patients receiving concomitant heparin. Septic patients in both groups clearly showed hypercoagulability, as defined by five TEG parameters, when
Static and Dynamic Presentation of Emotions in Different Facial Areas: Fear and Surprise Show Influences of Temporal and Spatial Properties  [PDF]
Holger Hoffmann, Harald C. Traue, Kerstin Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Steffen Walter, Henrik Kessler
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2013.48094
Abstract:

For the presentation of facially expressed emotions in experimental settings a sound knowledge about stimulus properties is pivotal. We hence conducted two experiments to investigate the influence of temporal (static versus dynamic) and spatial (upper versus lower half of the face) properties of facial emotion stimuli on recognition accuracy. In the first experiment, different results were found for the six emotions examined (anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness and surprise). Fear and surprise were more accurately recognized when using dynamic stimuli. In the second experiment using only dynamic presentations, recognition rates between upper and lower face varied significantly for most emotions with fear and happiness only being detectable in the upper or lower half respectively. The results suggest an emotion-specific effect for the importance of the facial area.

Evanescent field Sensors Based on Tantalum Pentoxide Waveguides – A Review
Katrin Schmitt,Kerstin Oehse,Gerd Sulz,Christian Hoffmann
Sensors , 2008, DOI: 10.3390/s8020711
Abstract: Evanescent field sensors based on waveguide surfaces play an important rolewhere high sensitivity is required. Particularly tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a suitablematerial for thin-film waveguides due to its high refractive index and low attenuation.Many label-free biosensor systems such as grating couplers and interferometric sensors aswell as fluorescence-based systems benefit from this waveguide material leading toextremely high sensitivity. Some biosensor systems based on Ta2O5 waveguides alreadytook the step into commercialization. This report reviews the various detection systems interms of limit of detection, the applications, and the suitable surface chemistry.
Schmallenberg virus challenge models in cattle: infectious serum or culture-grown virus?
Wernike Kerstin,Eschbaumer Michael,Breithaupt Angele,Hoffmann Bernd
Veterinary Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9716-43-84
Abstract: Schmallenberg virus (SBV), discovered in Europe in 2011, causes mild transient disease in adult ruminants, but fetal infection can lead to severe malformation in cattle, sheep and goats. To elucidate the pathogenesis of this novel orthobunyavirus, considerable efforts are required. A reliable and standardized infection model is essential for in vivo studies. In the present study, two groups of four cattle were inoculated with either serum passaged in cattle only or cell culture-grown virus. The replication of culture-grown SBV in cattle was reduced compared to virus inoculated via infectious serum. In a second experiment, the infectious serum was titrated in calves; the tested batch contained 102.83 infectious doses per mL. Hence, serum-borne virus that was only passaged in the natural host is a suitable option for a standardized SBV infection model.
Repeat Intrathecal Triamcinolone Acetonide Application Reduces Acute Occurring Painful Dysesthesia in Patients with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Kerstin Hellwig,Carsten Lukas,Niels Brune,Volker Hoffmann
The Scientific World Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2006.86
Abstract:
Evanescent field Sensors Based on Tantalum Pentoxide Waveguides ¢ € “ A Review
Katrin Schmitt,Kerstin Oehse,Gerd Sulz,Christian Hoffmann
Sensors , 2008,
Abstract: Evanescent field sensors based on waveguide surfaces play an important rolewhere high sensitivity is required. Particularly tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a suitablematerial for thin-film waveguides due to its high refractive index and low attenuation.Many label-free biosensor systems such as grating couplers and interferometric sensors aswell as fluorescence-based systems benefit from this waveguide material leading toextremely high sensitivity. Some biosensor systems based on Ta2O5 waveguides alreadytook the step into commercialization. This report reviews the various detection systems interms of limit of detection, the applications, and the suitable surface chemistry.
Natural Infection of Pregnant Cows with Schmallenberg Virus – A Follow-Up Study
Kerstin Wernike, Mark Holsteg, Horst Schirrmeier, Bernd Hoffmann, Martin Beer
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098223
Abstract: Schmallenberg virus (SBV), an orthobunyavirus discovered in European livestock in late 2011 for the first time, causes premature or stillbirth and severe fetal malformation when cows and ewes are infected during pregnancy. Therefore, cattle of two holdings in the initially most affected area in Germany were closely monitored to describe the consequence for fetuses and newborn calves. Seventy-one calves whose mothers were naturally infected during the first five months of pregnancy were clinically, virologically, and serologically examined. One calve showed typical malformation, another one, born without visible abnormalities, was dead. Two cows aborted during the studied period; spleen and brain samples or meconium swabs were tested by real-time PCR, in none of the fetuses SBV-specific RNA was detectable and the tested fetal sera were negative in a commercially available antibody ELISA. In contrast, in nine clinically healthy calves high SBV-antibody titers were measurable before colostrum intake, and in meconium swabs of six of these animals viral RNA was present as well. The mothers of all nine seropositive calves were presumably infected between days 47 and 162 of gestation, which is within the critical timeframe for fetal infection suggested for SBV and related viruses.
Active and Healthy Ageing at Work—A Qualitative Study with Employees 55 - 63 Years and Their Managers  [PDF]
Kerstin Nilsson
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.57002
Abstract: The proportion of elderly individuals in the population is increasing in most industrial countries. This demographic change increases the need of more people who work until an older age to maintain the welfare in the states. However, it is not clear if older employees are interested to in generally extend the working life to an older age. It is also not stated if managers in organizations are interested of extending their older employees working life. The overall aim of this study was to examine older employees own experience of their work situation and ageing at work. The aim was also to investigate their managers’ attitude to them as older employees. The investigation was conducted by focusing group interviews with employees aged 55 - 63 years, and with their mangers aged 40 - 63 years. The findings stated that the older employees’ consideration for an extend working life seemed to be based on their health and health problems in relation to their work situation; their personal economy; their managers attitude to them as elderly and the possibility to social inclusion at work; and their possibilities for self-crediting activities at work despite their age. The managers seem to have a positive attitude to some of the older employees’ experience knowledge, if that was in the same direction as their own interest. Otherwise the mangers saw the older employees as problem and obsoleted. The managers were also negative to older employees who got health problems which effect the work production negatively. The older workers in this study described managers’ importance to if they want to work in an extended working life. However, the managers seem not to understand their own importance in this and were not interested to keep all elderly in an extended working life.
The Influence of Work Environmental and Motivation Factors on Seniors’ Attitudes to an Extended Working Life or to Retire. A Cross Sectional Study with Employees 55 - 74 Years of Age  [PDF]
Kerstin Nilsson
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.57003
Abstract: Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate difference between whether individuals think they can work, and want to work until 65 years or not. Methods: A cross/sectional study including survey of 1949 employees aged 55 - 74 years. Results: Working environments were the most significant differences between the groups associated to if the respondents think they can work beyond 65 years or not. Motivation factors were the most significant differences between the groups associated with if the respondents want to work beyond 65 years or not. Conclusions: A satisfying work environment is important to whether people think they can work or not. Nevertheless, whether people want to work is depending on whether the employees are satisfied with the factors that promote their motivation for work. If society wants more people to work until an upper age, it is important to improve both work environmental factors and motivation factors in their work situation.
Schmallenberg Virus Infection of Adult Type I Interferon Receptor Knock-Out Mice
Kerstin Wernike, Angele Breithaupt, Markus Keller, Bernd Hoffmann, Martin Beer, Michael Eschbaumer
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040380
Abstract: Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel orthobunyavirus, was discovered in Europe in late 2011. It causes mild and transient disease in adult ruminants, but fetal infection can lead to abortion or severe malformations. There is considerable demand for SBV research, but in vivo studies in large animals are complicated by their long gestation periods and the cost of high containment housing. The goal of this study was to investigate whether type I interferon receptor knock-out (IFNAR?/?) mice are a suitable small animal model for SBV. Twenty IFNAR?/? mice were inoculated with SBV, four were kept as controls. After inoculation, all were observed and weighed daily; two mice per day were sacrificed and blood, brain, lungs, liver, spleen, and intestine were harvested. All but one inoculated mouse lost weight, and two mice died spontaneously at the end of the first week, while another two had to be euthanized. Real-time RT-PCR detected large amounts of SBV RNA in all dead or sick mice; the controls were healthy and PCR-negative. IFNAR?/? mice are susceptible to SBV infection and can develop fatal disease, making them a handy and versatile tool for SBV vaccine research.
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