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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 176 matches for " Kaitlyn McCormack "
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Can Conducting a Talking Circle about a Sensitive Topic Increase Participation for Elementary Aged Learners?  [PDF]
Patricia Lyons, Kaitlyn McCormack, Samantha Sauer, Michelle Chamblin
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1105594
Abstract:
This action research project investigated the effects of talking circles on student participation when engaging in sensitive topics. Researchers used 38-4th and 5th graders from two elementary classrooms. Both classrooms were located in Catholic schools. For the pretest phase, students were taught a series of controversial topics within the curriculum. To deconstruct the lesson themes, a traditional question, answer and discussion was employed. Researchers examined students’ participation, the quality of questions about injustice/justice that was raised and the students’ written statements about how they could make changes towards solutions. The strategy of using talking circles was implemented as a treatment. A second series of lessons concerning a controversial topic was presented. Students were directed to use the talking circle method to deconstruct themes in the lesson. Researchers again examined participation, the quality of questions about injustice/justice and students’ written statements about how they could make changes towards solutions. The researchers as teachers also reflected on their behavior and participation comparing a traditional discussion to the talking circle. The implementation of talking circles increased student participation, and the level of commitment to problem solving increased. The researchers as teachers also found that using the talking circle method was a more effective tool as it alleviated the role of teacher from expert to participant and facilitator. During the talking circle treatment, students communicated their opinions with civility. Researchers concluded that talking circles was an effective method for discussing sensitive topics for the 4th and 5th graders in this study. This corroborates the research on talking circles which has been implemented with older populations as much of the research begins with adolescent students. This research demonstrates that the method can be effective with younger populations and be an essential aid for teachers who may have difficulty presenting sensitive topics such as racism, death, gender differences, disability, immigration and slavery to younger students.
Small Islands – Big Problem: Senkaku/Diaoyu and the Weight of History and Geography in China-Japan Relations
Gavan McCormack
Asia-Pacific Journal : Japan Focus , 2011,
Abstract: In December 2010, the Okinawan city of Ishigaki (within which Japanese administrative law incorporates these islands) adopted a resolution to declare 14 January to be “Senkaku Islands Colonization Day.” The “Colonization Day” is intended to commemorate the incorporation of the islands by cabinet decision 116 years earlier. China immediately protested.Ishigaki was following the model of the Shimane Prefectural Assembly, which in 2005 declared a “Takeshima Day” in commemoration of the Japanese state’s incorporation 100 years earlier of the islands known in Japan as Takeshima but in South Korea (which occupies and administers them) as Tokdo. That Shimane decision prompted fierce protests in South Korea. The Ishigaki decision seems likely to do no less in China. Why should these barren rocks, inhabited only by endangered short-tailed albatross, be of such importance to otherwise great powers? Whose islands are they? How should the contest over them be resolved?
Boolean Algebraic Programs as a Methodology for Symbolically Demonstrating Lower and Upper Bounds of Algorithms and Determinism
Daniel McCormack
Computer Science , 2014,
Abstract: The lower and upper bound of any given algorithm is one of the most crucial pieces of information needed when evaluating the computational effectiveness for said algorithm. Here a novel method of Boolean Algebraic Programming for symbolic manipulation of Machines, Functions, and Inputs is presented which allows for direct analysis of time complexities and proof of deterministic methodologies. It is demonstrated through the analysis of a particular problem which is proven and solved through the application of Boolean algebraic programming.
Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Youth Experiences Survey for Sport (YES-S)  [PDF]
Philip J. Sullivan, Kaitlyn LaForge-MacKenzie, Matthew Marini
Open Journal of Statistics (OJS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojs.2015.55044
Abstract: Research on Positive Youth Development (PYD) has been hampered by lack of a valid measure for the construct, particularly for research in sport. The Youth Experiences Scale for Sport (YES-S) [1], is a five-factor measure of positive youth outcomes specifically designed for the sport context. The YES-S is a promising instrument that fills an important niche in PYD research, and MacDonald et al. provided support for many of its psychometric properties. However, the factor structure of the scale is currently based on an exploratory factor analysis and has not yet been subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The present study was designed to confirm the five-factor structure of the YES-S. A sample of 350 youth sport athletes (196 male, 153 female) completed the YES-S. A CFA showed that a modified version of the five-factor YES-S had excellent fit of the model to the data. An analysis of invariance showed no differences in responses in terms of gender. It is concluded that this short-form YES-S offers excellent psychometric properties while retaining the original factor structure of the YES-S. The results offer further support for the validity of the factor structure of the YES-S while providing a shorter version of the scale, which may be appealing for research with younger sport participants.
Fewnomial Systems with Many Roots, and an Adelic Tau Conjecture
Kaitlyn Phillipson,J. Maurice Rojas
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: Consider a system F of n polynomials in n variables, with a total of n+k distinct exponent vectors, over any local field L. We discuss conjecturally tight bounds on the maximal number of non-degenerate roots F can have over L, with all coordinates having fixed phase, as a function of n, k, and L only. In particular, we give new explicit systems with number of roots approaching the best known upper bounds. We also briefly review the background behind such bounds, and their application, including connections to computational number theory and variants of the Shub-Smale tau-Conjecture and the P vs. NP Problem. One of our key tools is the construction of combinatorially constrained tropical varieties with maximally many intersections.
Comparison of K+-channel genes within the genomes of Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster
Thomas J McCormack
Genome Biology , 2003, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2003-4-9-r58
Abstract: This study identifies at least eight voltage-gated K+-channel genes in Anopheles, as well as three Slo-family, three Eag-family and six inward rectifier K+-channel genes. The genomic organization of K+-channel genes from Drosophila and Anopheles is well conserved. The sequence identity of the most similar K+-channel gene products between these two species ranges from 42% to 98%, with a mean value of 85%. Although most K+-channel genes in Drosophila and Anopheles are present in a 1:1 ratio, Anopheles has more genes in three K+-channel types, namely KQT, Kv3, and inward rectifier channels. Microsynteny between the genes flanking K+-channel genes in Drosophila and Anopheles was seldom observed; however, most of the K+-channel genes are indeed located at positions which a previous genome-wide comparison has designated as homologous chromosomal regions.The Anopheles genome encodes more voltage-gated and inward rectifier K+-channel genes than that of Drosophila. Despite the conservation of intron-exon boundaries, orthologs of genes flanking K+-channel genes in Drosophila are generally not found adjacent to the Anopheles K+-channel orthologs, suggesting that extensive translocation of genes has occurred since the divergence of these two organisms.The rapid rate of sequence acquisition has revolutionized molecular biology. The sequencing of entire genomes, in addition to new computer-based search tools has allowed us to identify and analyze large sets of data very rapidly. The acceleration of data acquisition, in fields such as whole-genome sequence determination and genome-wide gene-expression profiling, has opened the door for the study of model organisms and organisms of importance to the study of medicine and disease states by allowing for the analysis of the entirety of genetic information in a given organism. The recent completion of the sequencing of the Anopheles gambiae genome provides us with the entire genetic makeup of this organism. Furthermore, the completion
Comparison of three cell block techniques for detection of low frequency abnormal cells
Hecht SA, McCormack M
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PLMI.S37555
Abstract: mparison of three cell block techniques for detection of low frequency abnormal cells Original Research (725) Total Article Views Authors: Hecht SA, McCormack M Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:5 Pages 1 - 7 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PLMI.S37555 Received: 31 August 2012 Accepted: 01 November 2012 Published: 04 January 2013 Steven A Hecht, Matthew McCormack Hologic Inc, Marlborough, MA, USA Background: The Cellient Automated Cell Block System rapidly creates paraffin-embedded cell blocks by using vacuum filtration to deposit a layer of cells on a filter and infiltrate those cells with reagents and paraffin. This study used a “tracer” cell model to mimic low frequency abnormal cells and compare detection and representative sampling with simple sedimentation, Richard-Allan HistoGel , and Cellient cell block techniques. Methods: Tracer cells were a cultured cell line (CaSki) fixed in methanol, prestained in solution with hematoxylin, and quantified using a hemacytometer. Tracer cells were diluted in a 10-fold dilution series ranging from 100 to 0.1 tracer/mL in a background of pooled clinical serous effusion specimens. Ten replicates of each dilution were processed using each cell block method, and the resulting blocks were cut to produce two slides from each block. The slides were deparaffinized, counterstained with eosin, cover-slipped, and screened for the presence of tracer cells. Blocks were considered to be representative of the specimen if tracer cells were detected on either of the slides. If no tracer cells were observed on either slide, the block was recut to generate a third slide. If tracer cells were seen on the third slide, the block was considered representative of the specimen. Results: Tracer cells were identified on the initial slides for 20 of 40 (50.0%) simple sedimentation, 21 of 40 (52.5%) of HistoGel, and 25 of 40 (62.5%) of Cellient cell blocks. Representative sampling of the 1 tracer/mL specimen was 10.0% for simple sedimentation and 30.0% for HistoGel and Cellient. Only Cellient showed representative sampling of the 0.1 tracer/mL specimen. Conclusion: The Cellient System blocks demonstrated representative sampling at the lowest tracer cell concentration compared with simple sedimentation and HistoGel.
Comparison of three cell block techniques for detection of low frequency abnormal cells
Hecht SA,McCormack M
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine International , 2013,
Abstract: Steven A Hecht, Matthew McCormackHologic Inc, Marlborough, MA, USABackground: The Cellient Automated Cell Block System rapidly creates paraffin-embedded cell blocks by using vacuum filtration to deposit a layer of cells on a filter and infiltrate those cells with reagents and paraffin. This study used a “tracer” cell model to mimic low frequency abnormal cells and compare detection and representative sampling with simple sedimentation, Richard-Allan HistoGel , and Cellient cell block techniques.Methods: Tracer cells were a cultured cell line (CaSki) fixed in methanol, prestained in solution with hematoxylin, and quantified using a hemacytometer. Tracer cells were diluted in a 10-fold dilution series ranging from 100 to 0.1 tracer/mL in a background of pooled clinical serous effusion specimens. Ten replicates of each dilution were processed using each cell block method, and the resulting blocks were cut to produce two slides from each block. The slides were deparaffinized, counterstained with eosin, cover-slipped, and screened for the presence of tracer cells. Blocks were considered to be representative of the specimen if tracer cells were detected on either of the slides. If no tracer cells were observed on either slide, the block was recut to generate a third slide. If tracer cells were seen on the third slide, the block was considered representative of the specimen.Results: Tracer cells were identified on the initial slides for 20 of 40 (50.0%) simple sedimentation, 21 of 40 (52.5%) of HistoGel, and 25 of 40 (62.5%) of Cellient cell blocks. Representative sampling of the 1 tracer/mL specimen was 10.0% for simple sedimentation and 30.0% for HistoGel and Cellient. Only Cellient showed representative sampling of the 0.1 tracer/mL specimen.Conclusion: The Cellient System blocks demonstrated representative sampling at the lowest tracer cell concentration compared with simple sedimentation and HistoGel.Keywords: Cellient , HistoGel , simple sedimentation, CaSki, microtomy
Editor's welcome, PORTAL, Vol. 2, No. 1, January 2005
Paul Allatson and Jo McCormack
PORTAL : Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies , 2005,
Abstract: This special issue of PORTAL Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies, jointly edited by Jo McCormack and Paul Allatson, is dedicated to exile and social transformation. Some of the papers presented here derive from a highly successful workshop and symposium on exile held at the Institute for International Studies, University of Technology Sydney, in July and December 2004. Others arrived in response to a call for papers sent out in early 2004, which attracted a great deal of attention. We would like to thank all those involved at the first two events for their productive discussions and feedback, and extend our thanks to the many people who responded to the call for papers on the topic. The next issue of PORTAL will also be a special issue, “Strange Localities: Utopias, Intellectuals and National Identities in the 21st Century,” with three guest editors: Alistair Fox (University of Otago), Murray Pratt (University of Technology, Sydney), and Hilary Radner (University of Otago). And, as always, we would like to encourage practitioners of international studies and cultural producers working anywhere in the world, and in any of the PORTAL languages, to submit material for future issues. Finally, and returning to this issue’s special theme, it was with great sadness that we learned from one of the contributors to this issue, Sue Hajdú, of her father’s recent death. Sue’s critical and creative meditation on her father’s status as a Hungarian exile is one of this issue’s highlights. On behalf of the members of the Portal Editorial Committee, this special issue is dedicated to him. Paul Allatson, Chair, PORTAL Editorial Committee
Introduction: Exile and Social Transformation
Paul Allatson,Jo McCormack
PORTAL : Journal of Multidisciplinary International Studies , 2005,
Abstract: This paper serves as an introduction to the special issue of Portal on exile and its potential to effect social change. The critical and creative discussions that follow this introduction respond to a particular set of problems. What factors permit and preclude exilic individual and communal transformation? Is there a need to rethink exilic agency in accord with local times, cultures and places, and to refocus attention on exile communal impacts on a host society? And, in a globalized epoch characterized by mass population movements across geopolitical lines, do states and national desires still have key roles to play in the production of exile? There are no straightforward answers to these questions, but all gesture toward the inadequacy of a single overarching definition or description of exile. Indeed, the process of exile has generated a great deal of debate regarding to whom the term exile applies and when. Furthermore, a number of unresolved issues recur in the extensive literature on the topic: the problematic location of exile and its definitional dependency on a home or homeland; the multivalent struggles to attain and maintain exilic voice, representation, memory, and identity on many fronts (individual, familial, communal, national, transnational); exile’s uneasy relation to modernity, the state, and globalization; and exile’s conceptual competition with other terms, such as diaspora, exodus, refugee and migrant. Intended as a selective reprise of these issues and the ways the contributors to this issue have responded to them, this introduction identifies some of the claims that have been made of exile as a space or mode of social transformation, as well as the possible limits of such claims. This article has been cited in the following: Ravn, Tine. Burmesiske flygtninge i Danmark: personlige narrativer omkring identitet, tilh rsforhold og integration. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Aalborg Universitet, Denmark, 2009. Smith, Carolyn. “Trial by Space; In Memory of My Mother.” Project Mimique (London), Feb. 27, 2008: http://www.projectmimique.org.uk/1-19.HTM. Mikula, Maja. “Displacement and Shifting Geographies in the Noir Fiction by Cesare Battisti,” Belphégor: Littérature Populaire et Culture Médiatique 6.2 (Juin 2007): http://etc.dal.ca/belphegor/vol6_no2/fr/main_fr.html
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