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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 138958 matches for " Jatin K. Nagpal "
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Neurofilament Heavy Polypeptide Regulates the Akt-β-Catenin Pathway in Human Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Myoung Sook Kim,Xiaofei Chang,Cynthia LeBron,Jatin K. Nagpal,Juna Lee,Yiping Huang,Keishi Yamashita,Barry Trink,Edward A. Ratovitski,David Sidransky
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009003
Abstract: Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/β-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of β-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/β-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.
Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Silenced by Promoter Methylation in Multiple Human Cancers
Mariana Brait, Shizhang Ling, Jatin K. Nagpal, Xiaofei Chang, Hannah Lui Park, Juna Lee, Jun Okamura, Keishi Yamashita, David Sidransky, Myoung Sook Kim
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044951
Abstract: The human cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene is a non-heme structured, iron-containing metalloenzyme involved in the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinate, and plays a key role in taurine biosynthesis. In our search for novel methylated gene promoters, we have analyzed differential RNA expression profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with or without treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Among the genes identified, the CDO1 promoter was found to be differentially methylated in primary CRC tissues with high frequency compared to normal colon tissues. In addition, a statistically significant difference in the frequency of CDO1 promoter methylation was observed between primary normal and tumor tissues derived from breast, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach. Downregulation of CDO1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in cancer cell lines and tumors derived from these tissue types. Expression of CDO1 was tightly controlled by promoter methylation, suggesting that promoter methylation and silencing of CDO1 may be a common event in human carcinogenesis. Moreover, forced expression of full-length CDO1 in human cancer cells markedly decreased the tumor cell growth in an in vitro cell culture and/or an in vivo mouse model, whereas knockdown of CDO1 increased cell growth in culture. Our data implicate CDO1 as a novel tumor suppressor gene and a potentially valuable molecular marker for human cancer.
Comparative study of oral and topical ketoconazole therapy in pityriasis versicolor
Nagpal V,Jain V,Aggarwal K
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2003,
Abstract: Introduction: Both topical and systemic ketoconazole are reported to be effective against pityriasis versicolor. Material and Methods: Forty patients suffering from pityriasis versicolor were treated either with oral ketoconazole 200 mg per day or 2% ketoconazole cream topically once daily for 2 weeks. Results: On global assessment, after 2 weeks of start of therapy, 18 (90%) out of 20 patients treated with oral ketoconazole were cured while 2 patients had considerable residual disease. In the ketoconazole cream group, 16 (80%) out of 20 patients were cured and 4 patients had considerable residual disease. Conclusion: No significant difference was observed in the response rates in the two groups. Relapse occurred in two patients of the systemic ketoconazole group and six patients of the topical ketoconazole group during the follow-up period of three months.
Vessels at the disc margin (cilioretinal and other simulating cilioretinal vessels)
Jain I,Singh Kapalmit,Nagpal K
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1972,
Abstract:
A study of pupil shape and size by sympathomimetics
Jain I,Nagpal K,Sharma P
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology , 1973,
Abstract:
Impact of Selfish Node Concentration in MANETs
Shailender Gupta,C. K. Nagpal,Charu Singla
International Journal of Wireless & Mobile Networks , 2011,
Abstract: The communication in Mobile Ad hoc Network (MANET) is multi-hop in nature wherein each node relaysdata packets of other nodes thereby spending its resources such as battery power, CPU time and memory.In an ideal environment, each node in MANET is supposed to perform this community service truthfully.However this is not the case and existence of selfish nodes is a very common feature in MANETs. Aselfish node is one that tries to utilize the network resources for its own profit but is reluctant to spend itsown for others. If such behaviour prevails among large number of the nodes in the network, it mayeventually lead to disruption of network. This paper studies the impact of selfish nodes concentration onthe quality of service in MANETs.
Utility and efficacy of navigation system use in interventional radiology  [PDF]
Jatin Kaicker, Sriharsha Athreya
Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics (OJCD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojcd.2013.33022
Abstract: Background: To ensure precision and accuracy during interventional radiologic (IR) procedures, navigation systems are utilized. There are four main categories of guidance systems that can be used to assist in IR procedures: optical system, electromagnetic (EM) tracking, Cone Bean Computer Tomography (CBCT) and Magnetic Navigation system. Objective: The purpose of this report is to examine some current medical literature to present an impression as to the state of navigation system use in interventional radiology. Methods: Three health databases were selected: Pubmed, Embase and OVID Medline, with the search terms “Interventional Radiology” and “Navigation System” being used. All included studies were presented in English. Studies were excluded if they did not pertain to navigation systems in interventional radiology, were in a language other than English, presented an abstract only or solely discussed interventional cardiology. Results: General themes emerged within the literature for the advantages of navigation system use including benefits to interventional radiologic procedures, increased patient accuracy and reduced procedure time and the potential for reduction in costs. Increased radiation exposure, problems accounting for respiratory motion and sterility remain issues for navigation system use. Conclusion: With potential to better standardize treatment using navigation systems, patients can have access to up-to-date technology for treatment. To ensure the highest standard of care, navigation systems should be used by interventional radiologists only. As indications and clinical efficacy are frequently being defined for navigation system use in interventional radiology, continual review of the published literature and large clinical trials for each system should be pursued.
Role of combination bortezomib and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma
Jatin J Shah, Robert Z Orlowski, Sheeba K Thomas
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S3340
Abstract: le of combination bortezomib and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma Review (4449) Total Article Views Authors: Jatin J Shah, Robert Z Orlowski, Sheeba K Thomas Published Date January 2009 Volume 2009:5 Pages 151 - 159 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S3340 Jatin J Shah1, Robert Z Orlowski1,2, Sheeba K Thomas1 1Departments of Lymphoma/Myeloma; 2Experimental Therapeutics, Division of Cancer Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA Abstract: The first in class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (B) received its initial regulatory approval for therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) in the relapsed/refractory setting. Modulation of proteasome function, however, is also a rational strategy for chemosensitization, and a variety of agents have shown synergistic activity with bortezomib pre-clinically, including anthracyclines. This formed the basis for evaluation of a regimen of bortezomib with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). PLD+B, in a phase I study, induced a predictable and manageable toxicity profi le, and showed encouraging anti-MM activity. In a recent international, randomized phase III trial, PLD+B demonstrated a superior overall response rate and response quality compared to bortezomib alone, as well as a longer time to progression, duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Sub-analyses revealed benefits in almost all clinically relevant subgroups, including several which would be considered to have high-risk disease. These findings have led to the establishment of the PLD+B regimen as one of the standards of care for patients with relapsed and/or refractory myeloma. Efforts are now underway to build on this combination further by adding other active anti-myeloma agents. In this review, we will discuss the role of PLD+B as an important addition to our therapeutic armamentarium for patients with MM.
Role of combination bortezomib and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in the management of relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma
Jatin J Shah,Robert Z Orlowski,Sheeba K Thomas
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2009,
Abstract: Jatin J Shah1, Robert Z Orlowski1,2, Sheeba K Thomas11Departments of Lymphoma/Myeloma; 2Experimental Therapeutics, Division of Cancer Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAAbstract: The first in class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (B) received its initial regulatory approval for therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) in the relapsed/refractory setting. Modulation of proteasome function, however, is also a rational strategy for chemosensitization, and a variety of agents have shown synergistic activity with bortezomib pre-clinically, including anthracyclines. This formed the basis for evaluation of a regimen of bortezomib with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD). PLD+B, in a phase I study, induced a predictable and manageable toxicity profi le, and showed encouraging anti-MM activity. In a recent international, randomized phase III trial, PLD+B demonstrated a superior overall response rate and response quality compared to bortezomib alone, as well as a longer time to progression, duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Sub-analyses revealed benefits in almost all clinically relevant subgroups, including several which would be considered to have high-risk disease. These findings have led to the establishment of the PLD+B regimen as one of the standards of care for patients with relapsed and/or refractory myeloma. Efforts are now underway to build on this combination further by adding other active anti-myeloma agents. In this review, we will discuss the role of PLD+B as an important addition to our therapeutic armamentarium for patients with MM.Keywords: multiple myeloma, relapsed/refractory, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, bortezomib, Doxil , Velcade
Continuous Dynamic Photostimulation - inducing in-vivo-like fluctuating conductances with Channelrhodopsins
Andreas Neef,Ahmed El Hady,Jatin Nagpal,Kai Br?king,Ghazaleh Afshar,Oliver M Schlüter,Theo Geisel,Ernst Bamberg,Ragnar Fleischmann,Walter Stühmer,Fred Wolf
Quantitative Biology , 2013,
Abstract: Central neurons operate in a regime of constantly fluctuating conductances, induced by thousands of presynaptic cells. Channelrhodopsins have been almost exclusively used to imprint a fixed spike pattern by sequences of brief depolarizations. Here we introduce continuous dynamic photostimulation (CoDyPs), a novel approach to mimic in-vivo like input fluctuations noninvasively in cells transfected with the weakly inactivating channelrhodopsin variant ChIEF. Even during long-term experiments, cultured neurons subjected to CoDyPs generate seemingly random, but reproducible spike patterns. In voltage clamped cells CoDyPs induced highly reproducible current waveforms that could be precisely predicted from the light-conductance transfer function of ChIEF. CoDyPs can replace the conventional, flash-evoked imprinting of spike patterns in in-vivo and in-vitro studies, preserving natural activity. When combined with non-invasive spike-detection, CoDyPs allows the acquisition of order of magnitudes larger data sets than previously possible, for studies of dynamical response properties of many individual neurons.
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