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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 139 matches for " Jamaica "
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Sociological means : colonial reactions to the radicalization of Rastafari in Jamaica, 1956-1959
Frank Jan van Dijk
New West Indian Guide , 1995,
Abstract: Study of the formative stage in the development of the Rastafarian movement. It was a time of rapid radicalization and heightened expectations of an imminent return to Africa. It ended, after a series of violent incidents, with an abortive repatriation effort in 1959. Focuses on the ways the colonial government reacted to Rastafari and the social unrest it created.
Heavy Metals in Soils around the Cement Factory inRockfort, Kingston, Jamaica  [PDF]
A. Mandal, M. Voutchkov
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2011.21005
Abstract: This study deals with the distribution of heavy metals in soils around one of the most important industries in Kingston, Jamaica i.e. the Carib Cement factory at Rockfort. The dust emitted from the Caribbean Cement Company Limited (Carib Cement), located in Rockfort, Kingston, gets deposited in course of time over the soil, leaves and forms a grey cover on the surrounding soils. Geochemical analysis of the top soil, collected from the present study area has been undertaken to assess the impact of the dust emitted from the cement factory and its effect on the surrounding ecosystem. A total of seventeen top soil samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected from the close vicinity of the Rockfort and the Harbour view area and analysed by INAA, AAS, XRF for major, minor and trace elements. Results show that the top soils of the study area are enriched in Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, V, Pb, and Hg which are released into the air from the cement kilns. Results show that the soils are enriched in Ca with a maximum value of 18% followed by Al, Fe and Na. Heavy metals in the soils of the study area shows relatively high concentrations of zinc with a maximum of 132 ppm followed by Cr (57) ppm and Pb (32) ppm. Maximum concentrations were found in soils sampled at a distance of 2-3 m from the cement factory as opposed to samples collected much further ie from the Harbour View area. High concentrations of the heavy metals in the soils near the cement factory as opposed to those further away can be due to the emissions from the factory. A significant contribution can also come from traffic emissions as the study area is located along one of the busiest street of Kingston, Jamaica.
Self-evaluated health of married people in Jamaica  [PDF]
Paul A. Bourne
Health (Health) , 2009, DOI: 10.4236/health.2009.14055
Abstract: Background: In the Caribbean in particular Ja-maica, no study has been done to examine married respondents in order to understand reasons for their greater health status. The ob-jectives of the current study are: 1) examine the sociodemographic characteristics of married people in Jamaica; 2) evaluate self-rated health status of married people in Jamaica; 3) deter-mine factors that account for good health status of married people and 4) provide public health practitioners with empirical studies that can be used to formulate policies for men in particular non-married men in Jamaica. Materials and me- thods: Stratified random sampling technique was used to select 6,783 respondents. It was a nationally representative sample. Logistic re-gression analysis was used to ascertain the correlates of health status. Results: The mean age for women in marriage in Jamaica was 6 years lower than that of men. The correlates of good health status (including moderate health) of respondents in descending order were self- reported illness (OR = 0.12, 95%CI = 0.01- 0.17); age (OR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.93-0.96); income (OR = 1.32, 95%CI = 1.05-1.66) and sex of respon-dents (Or = 1.14-2.32)—χ2(df = 4) = 383.2, P < 0.05. The four variables accounted for 44.4% of the explanatory power of the model; with self-reported illness accounting for 32.5% of the explanatory power. Conclusion: Marriage pro-vides greater access to more socioeconomic resources for its participants as well as increase men’s unwillingness to visit medical care prac-titioners.
Sustainable Tourism and Management for Coral Reefs: Preserving Diversity and Plurality in a Time of Climate Change  [PDF]
M. James C. Crabbe
Journal of Service Science and Management (JSSM) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2010.32031
Abstract: Coral reefs throughout the world are under severe challenges from a variety of anthropogenic and environmental factors. In a period of climate change, where mobility and tourism are under threat, it is useful to demonstrate the value of eco- and research-tourism to individuals and to cultures, and how diversity and pluralism in sustainable environments may be preserved. Here we identify the ways in which organisations use research tourism to benefit ecosystem diversity and conservation, show how an Earthwatch project has produced scientific information on the fringing reefs of North Jamaica, and how a capacity-building programme in Belize developed specific action plans for ecotourism. We discuss how implementation of those plans can help research tourism and preserve ecosystem diversity in times of climate change.
Socio-demographic determinants of health status of elderly with self-reported diagnosed chronic medical conditions in Jamaica  [PDF]
Paul. A. Bourne, Donovan. A. McGrowder
Health (Health) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/health.2010.22017
Abstract: Objectives: The aim of the current study is to examine the health status of elderly in rural, peri-urban and urban areas of residence in Ja-maica, and to propose a model to predict the social determinants of poor health status of elderly Jamaicans with at least one chronic disease. Methods: A sub-sample of 287 re-spondents 60 years and older was extracted from a larger nationally cross-sectional survey of 6783 respondents. The stratified multistage probability sampling technique was used to draw the survey respondents. A self-adminis-tered questionnaire was used to collect the data from the sample. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the demographic characteris-tics of the sample; chi-square was used to in-vestigate non-metric variables, and logistic re-gression was the multivariate technique chosen to determine predictors of poor health status. Results: Almost thirty six percent of the sam-ples had poor health status. Majority (43.2%) of the sample reported hypertension, 25.4% dia-betes mellitus and 13.2% rheumatoid arthritis. Only 35.4% of those who indicated that they had at least one chronic illness reported poor health status and there was a statistical relation be-tween health status and area of residence [χ2 (df = 4) = 11.569, P = 0.021, n = 287]. Rural residents reported the highest poor health status (44.2%) compared to other town (27.3%) and urban area residents (23.7%). Conclusions: Majority of the respondents in the sample had good health, and those with poor health status were more likely to report having hypertension followed by dia-betes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. Poor health status was more prevalent among those of lower economic status in rural areas who re- ported greater medical health care expenditure. The prevalence of chronic diseases and levels of disability in older people can be reduced with appropriate health promotion and strategies to prevent non-communicable diseases.
Erratum to “Heavy Metals in Soils around the Cement Factory in Rockfort, Kingston, Jamaica” [International Journal of Geosciences 2 (2011) 48-54]  [PDF]
A. Mandal, M. Madourie, R. Maharagh, M. Voutchkov
International Journal of Geosciences (IJG) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2015.63018
Abstract: This study deals with the distribution of heavy metals in soils around one of the most important industries in Kingston, Jamaicai.e.?the Carib Cement factory at Rockfort. The dust emitted from the Caribbean Cement Company Limited (Carib Cement), located in Rockfort, Kingston, gets deposited in course of time over the soil, leaves and forms a grey cover on the surrounding soils. Geochemical analysis of the top soil, collected from the present study area has been undertaken to assess the impact of the dust emitted from the cement factory and its effect on the surrounding ecosystem. A total of seventeen top soil samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected from the close vicinity of the Rockfort and the Harbour view area and analysed by INAA, AAS, XRF for major, minor and trace elements. Results show that the top soils of the study area are enriched in Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, V, Pb, and Hg which are released into the air from the cement kilns. Results show that the soils are enriched in Ca with a maximum value of 18% followed by Al, Fe and Na. Heavy metals in the soils of the study area shows relatively high concentrations of zinc with a maximum of 132 ppm followed by Cr (57) ppm and Pb (32) ppm. Maximum concentrations were found in soils sampled at a distance of 2-3m from the cement factory as opposed to samples collected much further ie from the Harbour View area. High concentrations of the heavy metals in the soils near the cement factory as opposed to those further away can be due to the emissions from the factory. A significant contribution can also come from traffic emissions as the study area is located along one of the busiest street of Kingston, Jamaica.
Internalizing stigma associated with mental illness: findings from a general population survey in Jamaica
Gibson,Roger Carl; Abel,Wendel Dwight; White,Sharon; Hickling,Frederick William;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49892008000100004
Abstract: objectives: the culture of stigma associated with mental illness is particularly intense when persons who are normally victims of that stigmatization (mentally ill persons and their family members) themselves act negatively toward others whom they associate with mental illness. we attempt to determine the extent of this internalization and assimilation of stigmatizing attitudes, cognitions, and behaviors in persons who are at risk for such stigmatization in jamaica. methods: data from a 2006 national survey on mental health were analyzed. demographic variables, the presence or absence of mental illness in respondents and in their family members, and responses pertaining to behaviors and attitudes toward mentally ill persons were examined. subsamples (respondents with mental illness, respondents with a family member with mental illness, respondents with neither) were compared using the chi-square test. results: respondents with family members with mental illness were less likely to demonstrate a number of different manifestations of stigmatization than others (p = 0.009-0.019). respondents with mental illness showed no difference in the demonstration of a number of different manifestations of stigmatization from other respondents (p = 0.069-0.515). conclusions: the small number of mentally ill respondents resulted in low statistical power for demonstrating differences between that subgroup and other respondents. the significantly more positive attitudes and behavior of respondents with family members with mental illness suggest that some benefit may be gained by creating more opportunities for the general public to interact with persons with mental illness.
Redefining personality disorder: a Jamaican perspective
Hickling,Frederick W; Paisley,Vanessa;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49892011000900010
Abstract: objective: to characterize and assess the factor structure of phenomenological features of dsm-iv personality disorder diagnosis in jamaican patients and determine any similarities with those of traditional criteria, associations with disorder severity, and/or significant relationships between variables to inform the current debate on the relevance of established personality disorder diagnostics. methods: this was a case-control study. all the patients included were seen by one private psychiatric practice from 1974 to 2007. the study sample group (n = 351) were patients diag nosed as having a personality disorder (dsm-iv axis ii). the control group was composed of patients with dsm-iv axis i clinical disorders, who had not been diagnosed with a personality disorder, and matched exactly on gender, and closely on age, as well as socioeconomic variables. results: of the 351 individuals in the study sample group, 166 (47.3%) were male and 185 (53.7%) were female; 50 (14.2%) were white and 301 (85.8%) were black; 293 (83.5%) were born and raised in jamaica; and 202 (57.6%) were from socioeconomic classes i and ii. mean age was 33.92 (standard deviation 10.236). disaggregating the phenomenology, the conventional dsm-iv personality disorder diagnoses disappeared. factor analysis of 38 clinical phenomena identified five components: psychosis, major depression, power management problems, psychosexual issues, and physiological dependency. independent t-tests revealed patients without personality disorder had significantly higher mean scores for psychosis; both groups scored equally for depression; and those with personality disorder had significantly higher mean scores on the remaining factors. analysis of variance indicated these factors differed significantly for three levels of severity (mild, moderate, and severe). conclusions: the phenomenology clustering into three major groups suggested an axis i (clinical) diagnostic disorder of impulse control and authority and conf
Politics and the redeemer : state and religion as ways of being in Jamaica
Diane J. Austin-Broos
New West Indian Guide , 1996,
Abstract: Study of the role of Jamaica's popular churches, particularly Baptist and Pentecostal, in their relations with the state and with a wider transnational world. Focuses on the relation between the experience of religion and the experience of race and class. Concludes that Jamaican Pentecostals experience inequality differently both from those who are non-religious and from Rastafarian groups.
Transnational popular culture and the global spread of the Jamaican Rastafarian movement
Neil J. Savishinsky
New West Indian Guide , 1994,
Abstract: Discusses the spread of the Rastafarian movement in the British Caribbean, North America, Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and the Pacific. In the vast majority of cases it has been reggae music which has functioned as the primary catalyst for spreading the religion and culture of Rastafari beyond Jamaica.
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