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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 4016 matches for " Jacques;Jarry "
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Risk Zones of Human Leishmaniases in the Western Mediterranean Basin: Correlations between Vector Sand Flies, Bioclimatology and Phytosociology
Rispail, Philippe;Dereure, Jacques;Jarry, Daniel;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 2002, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02762002000400004
Abstract: correspondence analysis was applied to sand fly sampling in 865 stations from the western mediterranean basin. the position of each of 24 species was determined with respect to the bioclimatic belts. thus, the multidimensional analyses manifest clear correlations between bioclimatic belts and their expression in the area, the phytosociological groupings, and vector species of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniases. the transfer of these data to usual maps allows to delimit the geographical distribution of these diseases in the western mediterranean basin and contributes to the determination, in a rational manner, of the high risk zones.
Risk Zones of Human Leishmaniases in the Western Mediterranean Basin: Correlations between Vector Sand Flies, Bioclimatology and Phytosociology
Rispail Philippe,Dereure Jacques,Jarry Daniel
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 2002,
Abstract: Correspondence analysis was applied to sand fly sampling in 865 stations from the Western Mediterranean basin. The position of each of 24 species was determined with respect to the bioclimatic belts. Thus, the multidimensional analyses manifest clear correlations between bioclimatic belts and their expression in the area, the phytosociological groupings, and vector species of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniases. The transfer of these data to usual maps allows to delimit the geographical distribution of these diseases in the Western Mediterranean basin and contributes to the determination, in a rational manner, of the high risk zones.
The Four Principles of Geographic Routing
Aubin Jarry
Computer Science , 2014,
Abstract: Geographic routing consists in using the position information of nodes to assist in the routing process, and has been a widely studied subject in sensor networks. One of the outstanding challenges facing geographic routing has been its applicability. Authors either make some broad assumptions on an idealized version of wireless networks which are often unverifiable, or they use costly methods to planarize the communication graph. The overarching questions that drive us are the following. When, and how should we use geographic routing? Is there a criterion to tell whether a communication network is fit for geographic routing? When exactly does geographic routing make sense? In this paper we formulate the four principles that define geographic routing and explore their topological consequences. Given a localized communication network, we then define and compute its geographic eccentricity, which measures its fitness for geographic routing. Finally we propose a distributed algorithm that either enables geographic routing on the network or proves that its geographic eccentricity is too high.
Invasion Dynamics of a Fish-Free Landscape by Brown Trout (Salmo trutta)
Jacques Labonne, Matthias Vignon, Etienne Prévost, Frédéric Lecomte, Julian J. Dodson, Renaud Kaeuffer, Jean-Christophe Aymes, Marc Jarry, Philippe Gaudin, Patrick Davaine, Edward Beall
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0071052
Abstract: Metapopulation dynamics over the course of an invasion are usually difficult to grasp because they require large and reliable data collection, often unavailable. The invasion of the fish-free freshwater ecosystems of the remote sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Islands following man-made introductions of brown trout (Salmo trutta) in the 1950's is an exception to this rule. Benefiting from a full long term environmental research monitoring of the invasion, we built a Bayesian dynamic metapopulation model to analyze the invasion dynamics of 85 river systems over 51 years. The model accounted for patch size (river length and connections to lakes), alternative dispersal pathways between rivers, temporal trends in dynamics, and uncertainty in colonization date. The results show that the model correctly represents the observed pattern of invasion, especially if we assume a coastal dispersal pathway between patches. Landscape attributes such as patch size influenced the colonization function, but had no effect on propagule pressure. Independently from patch size and distance between patches, propagule pressure and colonization function were not constant through time. Propagule pressure increased over the course of colonization, whereas the colonization function decreased, conditional on propagule pressure. The resulting pattern of this antagonistic interplay is an initial rapid invasion phase followed by a strong decrease in the invasion rate. These temporal trends may be due to either adaptive processes or environmental gradients encountered along the colonization front. It was not possible to distinguish these two hypotheses. Because invasibility of Kerguelen Is. freshwater ecosystems is very high due to the lack of a pre-existing fish fauna and minimal human interference, our estimates of invasion dynamics represent a blueprint for the potential of brown trout invasiveness in pristine environments. Our conclusions shed light on the future of polar regions where, because of climate change, fish-free ecosystems become increasingly accessible to invasion by fish species.
VRAC: Simulation Results #1
Florian Huc,Aubin Jarry
Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract: In order to make full use of geographic routing techniques developed for large scale networks, nodes must be localized. However, localization and virtual localization techniques in sensor networks are dependent either on expensive and sometimes unavailable hardware (e.g. GPS) or on sophisticated localization calculus (e.g. triangulation) which are both error-prone and with a costly overhead. Instead of localizing nodes in a traditional 2-dimensional space, we use directly the raw distance to a set of anchors to route messages in a multi-dimensional space. This should enable us to use any geographic routing protocol in a robust and efficient manner in a very large range of scenarios. We test this technique for two different geographic routing algorithms, namely GRIC and ROAM. The simulation results show that using the raw coordinates does not decrease their efficiency.
VRAC: Virtual Raw Anchor Coordinates Routing in Sensor Networks -- Concepts and Experimental Protocol
Florian Huc,Aubin Jarry
Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract: In order to make full use of geographic routing techniques developed for large scale networks, nodes must be localized. However, localization and virtual localization techniques in sensor networks are dependent either on expensive and sometimes unavailable hardware (e.g. GPS) or on sophisticated localization calculus (e.g. triangulation) which are both error-prone and with a costly overhead. Instead of localizing nodes in a traditional 2-dimensional space, we intend to use directly the raw distance to a set of anchors to route messages in the multi-dimensional space. This should enable us to use any geographic routing protocol in a robust and efficient manner in a very large range of scenarios.
Survival advantage of siblings and spouses of centenarians in 20th-century Quebec
Valérie Jarry,Alain Gagnon,Robert Bourbeau
Canadian Studies in Population , 2012,
Abstract: Longevity runs in families, either through genetic or environmental influences. Using Quebec civil registration and historical Canadiancensuses, we compared the longevity of siblings and spouses of 806 centenarians to a group of controls, all born in Quebec at the turnof the 20th century. Our results show that siblings of centenarians, who share half of their genes and a common childhood environment,lived 3–4 years longer than their birth cohort. However, husbands and wives of centenarians lived 4 and 2.5 years longer than theircounterparts of the same sex, respectively, suggesting that longevity is also modulated by shared environment in adulthood.
VRAC: Theory #1
Aubin Jarry,Pierre Leone,Jose Rolim
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: In order to make full use of geographic routing techniques developed for sensor networks, nodes must be localized. However, traditional localization and virtual localization techniques are dependent either on expensive and sometimes unavailable hardware (e.g. GPS) or on sophisticated localization calculus (e.g. triangulation) which are both error-prone and with a costly overhead. Instead of actually localizing nodes in the physical two-dimensional Euclidean space, we use directly the raw distance to a set of anchors to produce multi-dimensional coordinates. We prove that the image of the physical two-dimensional Euclidean space is a two-dimensional surface, and we show that it is possible to adapt geographic routing strategies on this surface, simply, efficiently and successfully.
Dark Energy as a Property of Dark Matter  [PDF]
Jacques Leibovitz
Journal of Modern Physics (JMP) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2011.212181
Abstract: A novel model of dark matter (DM), elastically compressible, can contribute to the acceleration of our Universe expansion. While each galaxy compresses its own DM within its gravitation field, the DM bordering neighboring galaxies, far from their centers, is pulled apart. It is shown that, although the DM pressure tends to zero at such locations, the DM compressibility tends to infinity. This allows the DM to expand between galaxies without gravitation hindrance. The model is consistent with the coupled distributions of baryonic and dark matters, with black hole formation at the centers of large galaxies, with galactic flat rotation curves, with a Tully-Fisher relation, and with Milgrom’s MOND relation. Results are discussed.
Mechanism and evolution of multidomain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases revealed by their inhibition by analogues of a reaction intermediate, and by properties of truncated forms  [PDF]
Jacques Lapointe
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2013.610115
Abstract: Many enzymes which catalyze the conversion of large substrates are made of several structural domains belonging to the same polypeptide chain. Transfer RNA (tRNA), one of the substrates of the multidomain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS), is an L-shaped molecule whose size in one dimension is similar to that of its cognate aaRS. Crystallographic structures of aaRS/tRNA complexes show that these enzymes use several of their structural domains to interact with their cognate tRNA. This mini review discusses first some aspects of the evolution and of the flexibility of the pentadomain bacterial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) revealed by kinetic and interaction studies of complementary truncated forms, and then illustrates how stable analogues of aminoacyl-AMP intermediates have been used to probe conformational changes in the active sites of Escherichia coli GluRS and of the nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
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