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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 297309 matches for " J Hindin "
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Understanding women's attitudes towards wife beating in Zimbabwe
Hindin,Michelle J.;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862003000700008
Abstract: objective: to investigate the factors associated with attitudes towards wife beating among women in partnerships in zimbabwe in order to assist public health practitioners in preventing intimate partner violence (ipv). methods: a nationally representative survey of 5907 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) was conducted in zimbabwe. women were asked about their attitudes towards wife beating in five situations. the survey included sociodemographic characteristics, partnership characteristics, and household decision-making. findings: over half of all women in zimbabwe (53%) believed that wife beating was justified in at least one of the five situations. respondents were most likely to find wife beating justified if a wife argued with her spouse (36%), neglected her children (33%), or went out without telling her spouse (30%). among women in partnerships (n = 3077), younger age, living in rural areas, lower household wealth, schooling at a lower level than secondary, and lower occupational status were associated with women reporting that wife beating is justified. women who reported that they make household decisions jointly with their partners were less likely to say that wife beating is justified. conclusions: zimbabwe has a long way to go in preventing ipv, particularly because the younger generation of women is significantly more likely to believe that wife beating is justified compared with older women. given the current social and political climate in zimbabwe, finding means to negotiate rather than settle conflict through violence is essential from the household level to the national level.
Understanding women's attitudes towards wife beating in Zimbabwe
Hindin Michelle J.
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2003,
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with attitudes towards wife beating among women in partnerships in Zimbabwe in order to assist public health practitioners in preventing intimate partner violence (IPV). METHODS: A nationally representative survey of 5907 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) was conducted in Zimbabwe. Women were asked about their attitudes towards wife beating in five situations. The survey included sociodemographic characteristics, partnership characteristics, and household decision-making. FINDINGS: Over half of all women in Zimbabwe (53%) believed that wife beating was justified in at least one of the five situations. Respondents were most likely to find wife beating justified if a wife argued with her spouse (36%), neglected her children (33%), or went out without telling her spouse (30%). Among women in partnerships (n = 3077), younger age, living in rural areas, lower household wealth, schooling at a lower level than secondary, and lower occupational status were associated with women reporting that wife beating is justified. Women who reported that they make household decisions jointly with their partners were less likely to say that wife beating is justified. CONCLUSIONS: Zimbabwe has a long way to go in preventing IPV, particularly because the younger generation of women is significantly more likely to believe that wife beating is justified compared with older women. Given the current social and political climate in Zimbabwe, finding means to negotiate rather than settle conflict through violence is essential from the household level to the national level.
Prevalence of Parasitaemia, Anaemia and treatment outcomes of Malaria among School Children in a Rural Community in Ghana
E Otupiri, D Yar, J Hindin
Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) , 2012,
Abstract: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Ejisu-Juaben District to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria and anaemia, and treatment outcomes in pupils of seven public schools public schools in a rural community in the forest belt of Ghana. Children with confirmed malaria parasites were randomly assigned to be treated with Artemisinin-based combination therapies available on the Ghanaian market. Post-treatment days 14 and 28 follow-up blood samples were taken to determine the treatment outcomes on peripheral parasitaemia and haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Out of 812 pupils (without malaria symptoms) who were screened, the baseline parasitaemia prevalence was 58.6%. Parasitaemia prevalence across the seven (7) public schools ranged from 49.7% to 71.0% (p =0.002). Post-treatment parasitaemia among the different treatment regimes were significant only at day 28 (p<0.001). The mean Hb concentration on the screening day was 10.5g/dl and over 60% of pupils were mildly anaemic (Hb <11.0g/dl) whereas 14% had Hb <8.0g/dl. Post-treatment Hb concentrations of pupils by days 14 and 28 were 11.4g/dl and 11.7g/dl with an improvement of 0.7g/dl and 0.9g/dl respectively over the baseline Hb concentration (p<0.001). The overall proportion of children with Hb concentrations <11.0g/dl was 32.6% and 25.3% by days 14 and 28 respectively. The burden of malaria and anaemia among school children is high and warrants investment to reduce these levels. These findings could be a reflection of the health situation that pertains in the basic public schools especially in the rural forest areas of Ghana.
Having a Say Matters: Influence of Decision-Making Power on Contraceptive Use among Nigerian Women Ages 35–49 Years
Funmilola M. OlaOlorun, Michelle J. Hindin
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098702
Abstract: Background Research suggests that women of reproductive age who are involved in household decision-making are more likely than those who are not involved to be able to control their fertility. Little is known, however, about this relationship among women at the upper end of the reproductive spectrum. The aim of this study was to determine the association between household decision-making power and modern contraceptive use among Nigerian women ages 35–49 years. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study involving a secondary analysis of data from the Nigerian 2008 Demographic and Health Survey was conducted among women ages 35–49 years who were considered to be in need of contraception. The outcome was modern contraceptive use while the main independent variable was a woman's household decision-making power score, constructed using principal component analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine whether the women's household decision-making power score, categorized into tertiles, was independently associated with modern contraceptive use. Data were weighted and adjusted for the complex survey design. Results Prevalence of modern contraceptive use among Nigerian women deemed to be in need of contraception in this study was 18.7%. Multivariate logistic regression showed that women's decision-making power remained statistically significantly associated with modern contraceptive use, even after adjusting for age, education, religion, polygyny, parity, wealth and domicile. Women who were in the highest decision-making power tertile had more than one and a half times the odds of using modern contraception compared with women in the lowest tertile [Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.70; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.31–2.21, p<0.001]. Significance Older Nigerian women who are involved in making household decisions are also able to make decisions related to their fertility. Programs in Nigeria focused on increasing modern contraceptive use should include strategies to increase women's status through encouraging more visible involvement in decision-making across different spheres of their lives.
Effects of Maternal Pregnancy Intention, Depressive Symptoms and Social Support on Risk of Low Birth Weight: A Prospective Study from Southwestern Ethiopia
Yohannes Dibaba Wado, Mesganaw Fantahun Afework, Michelle J. Hindin
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0096304
Abstract: Background Low birth weight (LBW) is the principal risk factor for neonatal and infant mortality in developing countries. This study examines the effects of unwanted pregnancy, prenatal depression and social support on the risk of low birth weight in rural southwestern Ethiopia. We hypothesized that unwanted pregnancy and prenatal depression increase the risk of low birth weight, while social support mediates this association. Methods Data for the study comes from a prospective study in which women were followed from pregnancy through to delivery. Six hundred twenty two women were followed and 537 birth weights were measured within 72 hours. Multivariable log binomial regression was used to model the risk of low birth weight. Results The mean birth weight was 2989 grams (SD±504 grams), and the incidence of LBW was 17.88%. The mean birth weight of babies after unwanted pregnancy was 114 g lower compared to births from intended pregnancy. Similarly, mean birth weight for babies among women with symptoms of antenatal depression was 116 grams lower. Results of unadjusted log-binomial regression showed that unwanted pregnancy, prenatal depression and social support were associated with LBW. The relationship between antenatal depressive symptoms and LBW was mediated by the presence of social support, while the association between LBW and unwanted pregnancy remained after multivariable adjustment. Conclusion The incidence of low birth weight is high in the study area. Poverty, nonuse of antenatal care, low social support and unwanted pregnancy contribute to this high incidence of low birth weight. Hence, identifying women’s pregnancy intention during antenatal care visits, and providing appropriate counseling and social support will help improve birth outcomes.
Listening to Women’s Voices: The Quality of Care of Women Experiencing Severe Maternal Morbidity, in Accra, Ghana
?zge Tun?alp, Michelle J. Hindin, Kwame Adu-Bonsaffoh, Richard Adanu
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0044536
Abstract: Background Women who survive severe obstetric complications can provide insight into risk factors and potential strategies for prevention of maternal morbidity as well as maternal mortality. We interviewed 32 women, in an urban facility in Ghana, who had experienced severe morbidity defined using a standardized WHO near-miss definition and identification criteria. Women provided personal accounts of their experiences of severe maternal morbidity and perceptions of the care they received. Methods and Findings The study took place in a referral facility in urban Accra, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with women who had either a maternal near miss (n = 17) or a potentially life-threatening complication (n = 15). The most common themes surrounding the traumatic delivery were the fear of dying and concern over the potential (or actual) loss of the baby. For many women, the loss of a baby negatively influenced how they viewed and coped with this experience. Women’s perceptions of the quality of the care highlighted several key factors such as the importance of information, good communication and attitudes, and availability of human (i.e., more doctors) and physical resources (i.e., more beds, water) at the facility. Conclusions Our results suggest that experiences of women with severe maternal morbidity may inform different aspects of quality improvement in the facilities, which in turn have a positive impact on future health seeking behavior, service utilization and reduction in maternal morbidity and mortality.
Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective
Rita Hindin, Doug Brugge, Bindu Panikkar
Environmental Health , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1476-069x-4-17
Abstract: We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to teratogenicity of depleted uranium.Animal studies firmly support the possibility that DU is a teratogen. While the detailed pathways by which environmental DU can be internalized and reach reproductive cells are not yet fully elucidated, again, the evidence supports plausibility. To date, human epidemiological data include case examples, disease registry records, a case-control study and prospective longitudinal studies.The two most significant challenges to establishing a causal pathway between (human) parental DU exposure and the birth of offspring with defects are: i) distinguishing the role of DU from that of exposure to other potential teratogens; ii) documentation on the individual level of extent of parental DU exposure. Studies that use biomarkers, none yet reported, can help address the latter challenge. Thoughtful triangulation of the results of multiple studies (epidemiological and other) of DU teratogenicity contributes to disentangling the roles of various potentially teratogenic parental exposures. This paper is just such an endeavor.In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU.Depleted uranium (DU) is a man-made, radioactive, heavy metal derived from uranium ore. Naturally occurring uranium ore (rock in which the uranium concentration is approximately 1,000 or more parts per million) is mined and processed to yield a much more concentrated substance, one that is virtually pure uranium. Natural uranium exists in three isotopic forms and contains 99.274% U238, 0.72% U235, and 0.0057% U234 by weight. DU, a byproduct of uranium enrichment, has an isotopic content of 99.75% U238, 0.25% U235, and 0.005% U234. As part of
Knowledge, Perceptions and Ever Use of Modern Contraception among Women in the Ga East District, Ghana
R Aryeetey, AM Kotoh, MJ Hindin
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2011,
Abstract: A survey of 332 women, ages 15-49 years, was carried out in the Ga East district of Ghana to identify community knowledge, perceptions, and factors associated with ever using modern family planning (FP). Knowledge of modern FP was almost universal (97 percent) although knowledge of more than three methods was 56 percent. About 60 percent of all, and 65 percent of married respondents reported ever use of a modern method. Among ever users, 82 percent thought contraceptives were effective for birth control. However, one-third did not consider modern FP safe. About 20 percent indicated their male partner as a barrier, and 65 percent of users reported at least one side effect. In a multivariate model that controlled for age, education, religion, and occupation, being married remained significantly associated (OR=2.14; p=0.01) with ever use of a modern contraceptive method. Interventions are needed to address service- and knowledge-related barriers to use (Afr J Reprod Health 2010; 14[4]: 27-32).
Factors Associated with Induced Abortion among Women in Hohoe, Ghana
CV Mote, E Otupiri, MJ Hindin
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2011,
Abstract: In Hohoe, Ghana, induced abortion is the second highest cause of hospital admissions. We aimed to describe factors influencing induced abortion among 408 randomly selected women aged 15-49 years. 21% of the women had had an abortion; of those, 36% said they did not want to disrupt their education or employment; 66% of the abortions were performed by doctors. Bivariate logistic regression showed that compared with women with secondary education, women with basic education (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.18-0.54) and uneducated women (OR = 0.24, 95% CI: 0.07-0.70) were significantly less likely to have had an abortion. Women who were married (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.10-3.04), peri-urban residents (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 0.95-3.94), and women with formal employment (OR = 2.22, 95% CI: 0.86-5.45) were more likely to have had an abortion. Stakeholders should improve access to effective contraception to lower the chance of needing an abortion and target education programmes at those with unmet need for contraception (Afr J Reprod Health 2010; 14[4]: 115-121).
Bride Price and Sexual Risk Taking in Uganda
D Bishai, KL Falb, G Pariyo, MJ Hindin
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2009,
Abstract: This study assessed the relationship of bride price to sexual risk taking based on a large, populationbased survey. Data were collected on bride prices for 592 married women in 12 districts in Uganda in 2001. Controlling for covariates, we found that having had a bride price significantly lowered the wife’s odds of sexual intercourse with a partner other than the spouse (OR= 0.222; 95% CI= 0.067, 0.737). Controlling for covariates, bride price increased the husband’s odds of non-spousal sexual intercourse (OR=1.489; 95% CI= 0.746, 2.972), although this finding is not statistically significant. Bride price payment is statistically significantly associated with lower rates of non-spousal sexual contact in women, but is not statistically significantly associated with higher rates in men (Afr J Reprod Health 2009; 13[1]:147-158).
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