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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 4271 matches for " Insulin resistant "
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Circulation Free Leptin in Diabetic Patients and its Correlation to Insulin Level
J. Mohiti,F. Talebi,M. Afkhami-Ardekani
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2009,
Abstract: Present researchers studied the relation between insulin with free and total leptin in type 2 diabetic patients. Thirty non insulin dependent diabetic obese patients (age: 50 ± 12 year and BMI>30 kg m-2) and thirty non insulin dependent diabetic non obese patients (age: 49 ± 25 year and BMI<25 kg m-2) were studied. Free leptin was purified by Gel filtration Chromatography and the fractions were collected and then their free leptin was measured by a high sensitive ELISA Kit. Circulation total leptin and insulin were measured by ELISA. Circulation free and total leptin were significantly correlated to insulin (p<0.005). Free leptin concentrations were higher in women than in men (p<0.001). Ratio of free leptin to total in obese subjects is more than non-obese subjects (0.27 ± 0.1 vs. 0.03 ± 0.04, p<0.001). Ratio of free to total leptin showed a positive correlations with insulin (r = 0.58, p<0.001) insulin resistance (r = 31, p<0.015) and BMI (r = 0.86, p<0.001). The majority of leptin which circulates in obese individuals was free form. Presumably it is bioactive portion of hormone and thus obese subjects are resistant to free leptin. These observations are consistent with the view that free leptin levels in diabetes patients attributed to changes in serum insulin level and insulin resistant.
Effects of Native Banana Starch Supplementation on Body Weight and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Type 2 Diabetics
Jorge L. Ble-Castillo,María A. Aparicio-Trápala,Mateo U. Francisco-Luria,Rubén Córdova-Uscanga,Arturo Rodríguez-Hernández,José D. Méndez,Juan C. Díaz-Zagoya
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph7051953
Abstract: Few fiber supplements have been studied for physiological effectiveness. The effects of native banana starch (NBS) and soy milk (control) on body weight and insulin sensitivity in obese type 2 diabetics were compared using a blind within-subject crossover design. Subjects undertook two phases of 4-week supplementation either with NBS or soy milk. Patients on NBS lost more body weight than when they were on control treatment. Plasma insulin and HOMA-I were reduced after NBS consumption, compared with baseline levels, but not significantly when compared to the control treatment. Results support the use of NBS as part of dietary fiber supplementation.
Resistant starch consumption promotes lipid oxidation
Janine A Higgins, Dana R Higbee, William T Donahoo, Ian L Brown, Melanie L Bell, Daniel H Bessesen
Nutrition & Metabolism , 2004, DOI: 10.1186/1743-7075-1-8
Abstract: 12 subjects consumed meals containing 0%, 2.7%, 5.4%, and 10.7% RS (as a percentage of total carbohydrate). Blood samples were taken and analyzed for glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Respiratory quotient was measured hourly. The 0%, 5.4%, and 10.7% meals contained 50 μCi [1-14C]-triolein with breath samples collected hourly following the meal, and gluteal fat biopsies obtained at 0 and 24 h. RS, regardless of dose, had no effect on fasting or postprandial insulin, glucose, FFA or TAG concentration, nor on meal fat storage. However, data from indirect calorimetry and oxidation of [1-14C]-triolein to 14CO2 showed that addition of 5.4% RS to the diet significantly increased fat oxidation. In fact, postprandial oxidation of [1-14C]-triolein was 23% greater with the 5.4% RS meal than the 0% meal (p = 0.0062).These data indicate that replacement of 5.4% of total dietary carbohydrate with RS significantly increased post-prandial lipid oxidation and therefore could decrease fat accumulation in the long-term.Resistant starch (RS) is any starch that is not digested in the small intestine but passes to the large bowel for fermentation [1]. Retrograded amylose (a linear polymer of glucose residues linked by α(1→4) bonds; RS1), such as cooked and cooled starchy foods like pasta salad, and native starch granules (RS2), such as those found in high-amylose maize starch and bananas, are the major components of dietary RS. Calories from RS that are undigested in the small intestine can be salvaged by fermentation to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA; acetate, butyrate, proprionate) by the microflora of the large bowel. Fermentation of RS in the large bowel gives rise to increased production of SCFA which is reflected in higher epithelial and portal concentrations. SCFA concentration in the periphery, however, is very low and therefore difficult to measure accurately so any increase in production of SCFA in response to RS consumption may no
Resistant starch consumption promotes lipid oxidation
Higgins Janine,Higbee Dana,Donahoo William,Brown Ian
Nutrition & Metabolism , 2004,
Abstract: Background Although the effects of resistant starch (RS) on postprandial glycemia and insulinemia have been extensively studied, little is known about the impact of RS on fat metabolism. This study examines the relationship between the RS content of a meal and postprandial/post-absorbative fat oxidation. Results 12 subjects consumed meals containing 0%, 2.7%, 5.4%, and 10.7% RS (as a percentage of total carbohydrate). Blood samples were taken and analyzed for glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. Respiratory quotient was measured hourly. The 0%, 5.4%, and 10.7% meals contained 50 μCi [1-14C]-triolein with breath samples collected hourly following the meal, and gluteal fat biopsies obtained at 0 and 24 h. RS, regardless of dose, had no effect on fasting or postprandial insulin, glucose, FFA or TAG concentration, nor on meal fat storage. However, data from indirect calorimetry and oxidation of [1-14C]-triolein to 14CO2 showed that addition of 5.4% RS to the diet significantly increased fat oxidation. In fact, postprandial oxidation of [1-14C]-triolein was 23% greater with the 5.4% RS meal than the 0% meal (p = 0.0062). Conclusions These data indicate that replacement of 5.4% of total dietary carbohydrate with RS significantly increased post-prandial lipid oxidation and therefore could decrease fat accumulation in the long-term.
Respuesta Glucémica e Insulínica de Pacientes con Diabetes Tipo 2 al consumo de Sopa de Calabaza Criolla (Cucúrbita Pepo L.) Enriquecida con Almidón de Banano
Torres-Zapata,Angel E; Aparicio-Trápala,María A; Blé- Castillo,Jorge L; Corzo-Sosa,Carlos A;
Información tecnológica , 2012, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-07642012000200009
Abstract: the aim of this study was to determine the glycemic index value and the insulinic response of a soup containing native banana starch. the beneficial effects of resistant starch in dietary supplementation on glycemic control have been reported previously, but these parameters have not been sufficiently studied. determinations were carried out in two groups: one of 12 healthy subjects and other with 12 type 2 diabetes. the estimated glycemic index value of the soup was 31.79. the total glucose and insulin areas under the curves were reduced in comparison with the reference food (p <0.01). the enriched soup with native banana starch might help in preventing type 2 diabetes prevalence in health subjects with high risk. also, this product can be used to decrease complications of people with diabetes.
Uso de la metformina en el tratamiento de pacientes infértiles con síndrome de ovarios poliquísticos
Giustiniano,Belvian; Rodríguez,Sheila; Abache,Enrique; Hurtado,Félix;
Revista de Obstetricia y Ginecología de Venezuela , 2010,
Abstract: objective: to determine the effect of treatment with metformin in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. methods: clinical, prospective and descriptive study. infertile anovulatory patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistant were included, and all of them, were treated with metformin for 3 months. patients who did not ovulate in this time, received clomiphene citrate for 6 months. setting: fertility service of maternidad "concepcion palacios". results: 62 infertile patients were included in this study. the pregnancy rate was 25.8 % (19 patients). the 57.9 % of women became pregnant with metformin administration for 3 months, with p= 0.492, it was not statistical significance. the pregnancy rate with clomiphene citrate was 23.5 % (8 patients), p= 0.684. the abortion rate was 26.3 % (5). conclusion: the metformin induce ovulation in anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome women, whereas the pregnancy rate resulted similar in both treatment groups: metformin alone and metformin and clomiphene citrate.
Dynamic changes of laboratory parameters of rats with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance: defining their role in development of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome
Yue Liu
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao , 2012,
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To observe the development of Chinese medicine syndromes of rats with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance by detecting dynamic changes of laboratory parameters. METHODS: A total of 110 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control group (n=50) and model group (n=60) to observe the correlation between laboratory parameter changes and development of Chinese medicine syndromes. A rat model of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance was established by feeding rats with high-calorie and high-fat diet together with peritoneal injection of streptozocin (30 mg/kg, once). At the end of 0, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks, 10 rats were randomly selected form each group and blood was taken from common carotid artery to detect contents of total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TAG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and leptinin serum, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) contents in plasma and whole blood and plasma viscosities. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and cAMP and ratio of cAMP/cGMP increased and content of cGMP decreased markedly from the 6th week to the 12th week. Concentrations of TC, TAG and LDL-C increased from the 8th week to the 12th week, while HDL-C decreased from the 10th week to the 12th week. Whole blood and plasma viscosity values under different shear rates increased significantly from the 10th week to the 12th week. CONCLUSION: Based on the understanding of markers which have close relationship with Chinese medicine syndromes of dual deficiency of qi and yin, turbid phlegm and blood stasis, combining with the dynamic changes of appearance behavior and laboratory parameters of this animal experiment, the authors speculate the development characteristics of Chinese medicine syndromes in rats with type 2 diabetes. The dynamic progress of Chinese medicine syndromes and pathology varies from dual deficiency of qi and yin to dual deficiency of qi and yin with turbid phlegm, and at last to the combination of dual deficiency of qi and yin, turbid phlegm and blood stasis.
Dietary resistant starch dose-dependently reduces adiposity in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant male rats
Belobrajdic Damien P,King Roger A,Christophersen Claus T,Bird Anthony R
Nutrition & Metabolism , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1743-7075-9-93
Abstract: Background Animal studies show that diets containing resistant starch (RS) at levels not achievable in the human diet result in lower body weight and/or adiposity in rodents. We aimed to determine whether RS dose-dependently reduces adiposity in obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (n=120) were fed a moderate-fat, high-energy diet for 4 wk. Rats that gained the most weight (40%) were classified as obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) rats were the 40% that gained the least weight. OP and OR rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups (n=8 for each phenotype). One group was killed for baseline measurements, the other five groups were allocated to AIN-93 based diets that contained 0, 4, 8, 12 and 16% RS (as high amylose maize starch) for 4 wk. These diets were matched for total carbohydrate content. At 0, 4 and 7 wk from the start of the study insulin sensitivity was calculated by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and adiposity was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). At 8 wk, rats were euthanized and fat pad weights, intestinal digesta short chain fatty acid (SCFA) pools and plasma gut hormone levels were determined. Results Obesity prone rats gained less weight with 4, 12 and 16% RS compared to 0% RS, but the effect in OR animals was significant only at 16% RS. Irrespective of phenotype, diets containing ≥8% RS reduced adiposity compared to 0% RS. Energy intake decreased by 9.8 kJ/d for every 4% increase in RS. All diets containing RS increased total SCFA pools in the caecum and lowered plasma GIP concentrations compared to the 0% RS, whereas plasma GLP-1 and PYY were increased when the diet contained at least 8% RS. Insulin sensitivity was not affected by RS. Conclusion RS in amounts that could be potentially consumed by humans were effective in reducing adiposity and weight gain in OP and OR rats, due in part to a reduction in energy intake, and changes in gut hormones and large bowel carbohydrate fermentation.
Evaluation of Antihyperlipidemic, Hypoglycemic and Antioxidant Potential of Ficus infectoria Methanolic Extract in Wistar Rats
Ashok Kumar Gupta,Subhash Dwivedi,Aseem Sharma,Gajraj Singh Lodhi
Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry , 2013,
Abstract: Objective- To explore the hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antioxidant activity of the methanolic extract of Ficus infectoria on fructose induced hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in Wistar rats.Materials and Methods- Hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia in rats were induced by fructose solution (10% w/v, p.o., ad libitum) for 3rd and 8th weeks respectively. These activities were measured by estimating the triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, VLDL, HDL and serum glucose levels. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) assay method was used to determine the antioxidant activity.Results- In all model, F. infectoria at 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg showed significant effect. Fructose feeding increased serum biochemical parameters like triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, VLDL and serum glucose levels while decreases the HDL level. In fructose fed rats, F. infectoria at 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg significantly prevented the increase in serum biochemical parameters while decrease in HDL level. Also it was able to scavenge the free radical generated by Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).Conclusion- The present study indicates that methanolic extract of F. infectoria leaf and bark (mixture) has Antihyperlipidemic, hypoglycemic and antioxidant potentials. In future it may be useful in the management of insulin resistant.
Differential Effects of High-Carbohydrate and High-Fat Diet Composition on Metabolic Control and Insulin Resistance in Normal Rats
Jorge L. Ble-Castillo,María A. Aparicio-Trapala,Isela E. Juárez-Rojop,Jorge E. Torres-Lopez,Jose D. Mendez,Hidemi Aguilar-Mariscal,Viridiana Olvera-Hernández,Leydi C. Palma-Cordova,Juan C. Diaz-Zagoya
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph9051663
Abstract: The macronutrient component of diets is critical for metabolic control and insulin action. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high fat diets (HFDs) vs. high carbohydrate diets (HCDs) on metabolic control and insulin resistance in Wistar rats. Thirty animals divided into five groups (n = 6) were fed: (1) Control diet (CD); (2) High-saturated fat diet (HSFD); (3) High-unsaturated fat diet (HUFD); (4) High-digestible starch diet, (HDSD); and (5) High-resistant starch diet (HRSD) during eight weeks. HFDs and HCDs reduced weight gain in comparison with CD, however no statistical significance was reached. Calorie intake was similar in both HFDs and CD, but rats receiving HCDs showed higher calorie consumption than other groups, ( p < 0.01). HRSD showed the lowest levels of serum and hepatic lipids. The HUFD induced the lowest fasting glycemia levels and HOMA-IR values. The HDSD group exhibited the highest insulin resistance and hepatic cholesterol content. In conclusion, HUFD exhibited the most beneficial effects on glycemic control meanwhile HRSD induced the highest reduction on lipid content and did not modify insulin sensitivity. In both groups, HFDs and HCDs, the diet constituents were more important factors than caloric intake for metabolic disturbance and insulin resistance.
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