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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 12785 matches for " Hugo Cogo-Moreira "
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Pathway Evidence of How Musical Perception Predicts Word-Level Reading Ability in Children with Reading Difficulties
Hugo Cogo-Moreira, Clara Regina Brand?o de ávila, George B. Ploubidis, Jair de Jesus Mari
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084375
Abstract: Objective To investigate whether specific domains of musical perception (temporal and melodic domains) predict the word-level reading skills of eight- to ten-year-old children (n = 235) with reading difficulties, normal quotient of intelligence, and no previous exposure to music education classes. Method A general-specific solution of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), which underlies a musical perception construct and is constituted by three latent factors (the general, temporal, and the melodic domain), was regressed on word-level reading skills (rate of correct isolated words/non-words read per minute). Results General and melodic latent domains predicted word-level reading skills.
Effectiveness of Music Education for the Improvement of Reading Skills and Academic Achievement in Young Poor Readers: A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial
Hugo Cogo-Moreira, Clara Regina Brand?o de ávila, George B. Ploubidis, Jair de Jesus Mari
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059984
Abstract: Introduction Difficulties in word-level reading skills are prevalent in Brazilian schools and may deter children from gaining the knowledge obtained through reading and academic achievement. Music education has emerged as a potential method to improve reading skills because due to a common neurobiological substratum. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of music education for the improvement of reading skills and academic achievement among children (eight to 10 years of age) with reading difficulties. Method 235 children with reading difficulties in 10 schools participated in a five-month, randomized clinical trial in cluster (RCT) in an impoverished zone within the city of S?o Paulo to test the effects of music education intervention while assessing reading skills and academic achievement during the school year. Five schools were chosen randomly to incorporate music classes (n = 114), and five served as controls (n = 121). Two different methods of analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention: The standard method was intention-to-treat (ITT), and the other was the Complier Average Causal Effect (CACE) estimation method, which took compliance status into account. Results The ITT analyses were not very promising; only one marginal effect existed for the rate of correct real words read per minute. Indeed, considering ITT, improvements were observed in the secondary outcomes (slope of Portuguese = 0.21 [p<0.001] and slope of math = 0.25 [p<0.001]). As for CACE estimation (i.e., complier children versus non-complier children), more promising effects were observed in terms of the rate of correct words read per minute [β = 13.98, p<0.001] and phonological awareness [β = 19.72, p<0.001] as well as secondary outcomes (academic achievement in Portuguese [β = 0.77, p<0.0001] and math [β = 0.49, p<0.001] throughout the school year). Conclusion The results may be seen as promising, but they are not, in themselves, enough to make music lessons as public policy.
Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in Brazilian Samples of Different Age Groups: Findings from Confirmatory Factor Analysis
Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira, Hugo Cogo-Moreira, Giovanni Abrah?o Salum, Elisa Brietzke, Thiago Wendt Viola, Gisele Gus Manfro, Christian Haag Kristensen, Adriane Xavier Arteche
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087118
Abstract: The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is internationally accepted as a key tool for the assessment of childhood abuse and neglect experiences. However, there are relative few psychometric studies available and some authors have proposed two different factor solutions. We examined the dimensional structure and internal consistency of the Brazilian version of the CTQ. A total of 1,925 participants from eight different clinical and non-clinical samples including adolescents, adults and elders were considered in this study. First, we performed Confirmatory Factor Analysis to investigate the goodness of fit of the two proposed competitive factor structure models for the CTQ. We also investigated the internal consistency of all factors. Second, multi-group analyses were used to investigate measurement invariance and population heterogeneity across age groups and sex. Our findings revealed that the alternative factor structure as opposed to the original factor structure was the most appropriate model within adolescents and adults Brazilian samples. We provide further evidence for the validity and reliability of the CTQ within the Brazilian samples and report that the alternative model showed an improvement in fit indexes and may be a better alternative over the original model.
EACOL (Scale of Evaluation of Reading Competence by the Teacher): evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity
Cogo-Moreira H, Ploubidis GB, de ávila CR, Mari JJ, Pinheiro AM
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S36196
Abstract: COL (Scale of Evaluation of Reading Competence by the Teacher): evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity Original Research (1051) Total Article Views Authors: Cogo-Moreira H, Ploubidis GB, de ávila CR, Mari JJ, Pinheiro AM Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:8 Pages 443 - 454 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S36196 Received: 21 July 2012 Accepted: 15 August 2012 Published: 11 October 2012 Hugo Cogo-Moreira,1 George B Ploubidis,2 Clara Regina Brand o de ávila,3 Jair de Jesus Mari,1 Angela Maria Vieira Pinheiro4 1Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of S o Paulo, S o Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Population Studies, University of London, London, UK; 3Department of Hearing and Speech Pathology, Federal University of S o Paulo, S o Paulo, Brazil; 4Department of Psychology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil Aim: The study aimed to provide information about the concurrent and discriminant validation of the Scale of Evaluation of Reading Competence by the Teacher (EACOL), which is composed of 27 dichotomous items concerning reading aloud (17 items) and reading silently (10 items). Samples: Three samples were used in this validation study. The first was composed of 335 students with an average age of 9.75 years (SD = 1.2) from Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais State), Brazil, where the full spectrum of reading ability was assessed. The second two samples were from S o Paulo city (S o Paulo State), Brazil, where only children with reading difficulties were recruited. The first S o Paulo sample was labeled “SP-screening” and had n = 617, with a mean age of 9.8 years (SD = 1.0), and the other sample was labeled “SP-trial” and had n = 235, with a mean age of 9.15 years (SD = 0.05). Methods: Results were obtained from a latent class analysis LCA, in which two latent groups were obtained as solutions, and were correlated with direct reading measures. Also, students’ scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale and on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire tested the discriminant validation. Results: Latent groups of readers underlying the EACOL predicted all direct reading measures, while the same latent groups showed no association with behavior and intelligence assessments, giving concurrent and discriminant validity to EACOL, respectively. Conclusion: EACOL is a reliable screening tool which can be used by a wide range of professionals for assessing reading skills.
EACOL (Scale of Evaluation of Reading Competence by the Teacher): evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity
Cogo-Moreira H,Ploubidis GB,de Ávila CR,Mari JJ
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment , 2012,
Abstract: Hugo Cogo-Moreira,1 George B Ploubidis,2 Clara Regina Brand o de ávila,3 Jair de Jesus Mari,1 Angela Maria Vieira Pinheiro41Department of Psychiatry, Federal University of S o Paulo, S o Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Population Studies, University of London, London, UK; 3Department of Hearing and Speech Pathology, Federal University of S o Paulo, S o Paulo, Brazil; 4Department of Psychology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, BrazilAim: The study aimed to provide information about the concurrent and discriminant validation of the Scale of Evaluation of Reading Competence by the Teacher (EACOL), which is composed of 27 dichotomous items concerning reading aloud (17 items) and reading silently (10 items).Samples: Three samples were used in this validation study. The first was composed of 335 students with an average age of 9.75 years (SD = 1.2) from Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais State), Brazil, where the full spectrum of reading ability was assessed. The second two samples were from S o Paulo city (S o Paulo State), Brazil, where only children with reading difficulties were recruited. The first S o Paulo sample was labeled “SP-screening” and had n = 617, with a mean age of 9.8 years (SD = 1.0), and the other sample was labeled “SP-trial” and had n = 235, with a mean age of 9.15 years (SD = 0.05).Methods: Results were obtained from a latent class analysis LCA, in which two latent groups were obtained as solutions, and were correlated with direct reading measures. Also, students’ scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale and on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire tested the discriminant validation.Results: Latent groups of readers underlying the EACOL predicted all direct reading measures, while the same latent groups showed no association with behavior and intelligence assessments, giving concurrent and discriminant validity to EACOL, respectively.Conclusion: EACOL is a reliable screening tool which can be used by a wide range of professionals for assessing reading skills.Keywords: school children, latent class analysis, assessment, reading difficulties, validation
Small NFAs from Regular Expressions: Some Experimental Results
Hugo Gouveia,Nelma Moreira,Rogério Reis
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: Regular expressions (res), because of their succinctness and clear syntax, are the common choice to represent regular languages. However, efficient pattern matching or word recognition depend on the size of the equivalent nondeterministic finite automata (NFA). We present the implementation of several algorithms for constructing small epsilon-free NFAss from res within the FAdo system, and a comparison of regular expression measures and NFA sizes based on experimental results obtained from uniform random generated res. For this analysis, nonredundant res and reduced res in star normal form were considered.
The lung at high altitude
Annalisa Cogo
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/2049-6958-6-1-14
Abstract: A new classification of altitude levels based on the effects on performance and well-being has been recently proposed [1]: the decrease in partial pressure of oxygen reduces maximal oxygen uptake and impairs "aerobic" performance by reducing maximal aerobic power. Submaximal exercise performance is also impaired at altitude. When the acclimatization is not adequate, hypoxia triggers maladaptive responses that lead to various forms of high altitude illness or acute mountain sickness (AMS), characterized by headache plus gastrointestinal symptoms (anorexia, nausea) and sleep disturbances. AMS is present in 10-30% of subjects at altitudes between 2500 and 3000 m a.s.l. and is usually due to a fast ascent. It is well defined by the short phrase: "Too fast, too high". Less frequent, but much more serious, consequences are high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).The lung response to acute altitude exposure is mainly hyperventilation which, together with elevated heart rate, aims at achieving an adequate supply of oxygen to the tissues. At rest, ventilation increases by firstly increasing the tidal volume, at least up to 3500 m. Above this altitude, also the breathing rate significantly increases. Besides the compensatory response, other mechanisms affect lung physiology during hypoxic exposure: the increase of pulmonary artery pressure and endothelial permeability which can explain the extravascular lung fluid accumulation described in many papers [2]. It must be underlined that the interstitial fluid accumulation which affects a large part of climbers at high altitude should be considered a para-physiological mechanism and does not predict subsequent pulmonary edema [3].The role of the lung in the acute exposure to altitude was first described by Angelo Mosso, physiologist at the University of Torino, at the end of the 19th century. He very well pointed out the changes in ventilation and the reduction of lung volumes consistent with
Libraries Demonstrate Low Adherence to Virtual Reference Service Guidelines. A Review of: Shachaf, Pnina, and Sarah M. Horowitz. “Virtual Reference Service Evaluation: Adherence to RUSA Behavioral Guidelines and IFLA Digital Reference Guidelines.” Library & Information Science Research 30.2 (2008): 122-37.
Elise Cogo
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice , 2009,
Abstract: Objectives – This study evaluates the level to which virtual (asynchronous e-mail) reference services adhere to professional guidelines. Specifically, it addresses the following research questions: 1) To what extent do virtual reference services adhere to the American Library Association (ALA) Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) and the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) guidelines? 2) How does the level of adherence to RUSA or IFLA guidelines vary based on request type, user name, and institution? 3) Is there a correlation between outcome measures of reference transactions (accuracy, completeness, and satisfaction) and the level of adherence to RUSA or IFLA guidelines? Design – Unobtrusive evaluation of researcher-generated queries. Setting – Fifty-four academic libraries in North America. Subjects – A total of 324 queries were sent to the 54 libraries, with each library receiving six different types of requests from six different user names. Methods – Researchers developed two coding schemes for the guidelines (34 codes and 12 attributes for the RUSA guidelines and 33 codes and 10 attributes for the IFLA guidelines). Each of the six user names used represented an ethnic and/or religious group identity: Mary Anderson (Caucasian, Christian), Moshe Cohen (Caucasian, Jewish), Ahmed Ibrahim (Arab), Latoya Johnson (African American), Rosa Manuz (Hispanic), and Chang Su (Asian). The six request types were designed so that three would be answered (questions 1-3) and three would be out of scope and not answered (questions 4-6). The following queries were sent, individualized for each institution: 1) Dissertation query; 2) Sports team query; 3) Population query; 4) Subject query; 5) Article query; 6) Request for a PDF copy. The 324 queries were uploaded into NVivo 2 software, and all e-mail transactions were coded and analyzed. Main Results – Analysis of the 324 transactions from 54 libraries showed the following results:1) Low levels of adherence to both sets of guidelines;2) Varied levels of adherence based on request types and user names on both sets of guidelines;3) Variation in institutional rank according to different sets of guidelines;4) No correlation between user satisfaction and adherence to either set of guidelines. Conclusion – This study suggests that higher levels of virtual reference service effectiveness could be achieved by automatically integrating some less observed behaviours (e.g., thank you notes) into replies sent to users and by increasing librarians’ awareness of professional guidelines through training
O Outro migrante: das estratégias de midiatiza o das migra es contemporaneas na mídia impressa brasileira
Denise Cogo
Ciberlegenda , 2011,
Abstract: O artigo analisa os processos de produ o de sentido sobre os fen menos migratórios contemporaneos na mídia impressa brasileira. A partir das inter-rela es entre processos de midiatiza o, experiência migratória e interculturalidade, é desenvolvido um mapeamento inicial e uma análise discursiva sobre as estratégias de midiatiza o das migra es e das falas imigrantes em uma amostra de jornais representativos das cinco regi es brasileiras e uma das principais revistas de circula o nacional.
Detec??o do Grapevine virus A e Grapevine virus B por hibridiza??o "dot-blot" com sondas moleculares n?o radioativas
Moreira, Andreia E;Gaspar, José O;Kuniyuki, Hugo;
Fitopatologia Brasileira , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-41582005000500015
Abstract: grapevine virus a (gva) and grapevine virus b (gvb) are involved in the kober stem grooving and grapevine corky bark diseases, respectively. this work reports the molecular detection of isolates of gva (gva-sp) and gvb (gvb-c-sp and gvb-i-sp) in grapevines (vitis spp.) and tobacco (nicotiana occidentalis) by non-radioactive molecular probes. the digoxigenin-labeled probes were generated by rt-pcr using specific primers to the coat protein genes. total rna was extracted from 45 plants of several grapevine varieties and from 13 plants of tobacco mechanically inoculated with gvb. the rna extracted from infected plants, considered infected by biological indexing, reacted to the cdna probes while there was no hybridization with healthy plants. these results were also confirmed by rt-pcr experiments. the use of the cdna probes hybridization was proved to be efficient in detecting both gva and gvb with high specificity and sensitivity. however, mature leaves and dormant cuttings should be preferably used in diagnostic tests of gvb and gva, respectively.
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