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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2834 matches for " Howard Quigley "
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The Potential of Photo-Talks to Reveal the Development of Scientific Discourses  [PDF]
Cassie Quigley, Gayle Buck
Creative Education (CE) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.32033
Abstract: This study explores the potential of a photo-elicitation technique, photo-talks (Serriere, 2010), for understanding how young girls understand, employ and translate new scientific discourses. Over the course of a nine week period, 24 kindergarten girls in an urban girls’ academy were observed, videotaped, photographed and interviewed while they were immersed into scientific discourse. This paper explicitly describes how their emerging discursive patterns were made visible through this methodological tool. The findings are presented in vignettes in three themes uncovered during our analysis which are the following: Presented the recollection of the scientific Discourse, Described the understanding of scientific Discourse, and Created an opportunity for the translation into everyday discourse. Science educators can benefit from this methodological tool as a reflective tool with their participants, to validate and/or complicate data. Additionally, this methodological tool serves to make discourse patterns more visible by providing a visual backdrop to the conversations thus revealing the development as it is occurring in young children.
Survival Model Inference Using Functions of Brownian Motion  [PDF]
John O’Quigley
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/am.2012.36098
Abstract: A family of tests for the presence of regression effect under proportional and non-proportional hazards models is described. The non-proportional hazards model, although not completely general, is very broad and includes a large number of possibilities. In the absence of restrictions, the regression coefficient, β(t), can be any real function of time. When β(t) = β, we recover the proportional hazards model which can then be taken as a special case of a non-proportional hazards model. We study tests of the null hypothesis; H0:β(t) = 0 for all t against alternatives such as; H1:∫β(t)dF(t) ≠ 0 or H1:β(t) ≠ 0 for some t. In contrast to now classical approaches based on partial likelihood and martingale theory, the development here is based on Brownian motion, Donsker’s theorem and theorems from O’Quigley [1] and Xu and O’Quigley [2]. The usual partial likelihood score test arises as a special case. Large sample theory follows without special arguments, such as the martingale central limit theorem, and is relatively straightforward.
Seasonal Foraging Ecology of Non-Migratory Cougars in a System with Migrating Prey
L. Mark Elbroch, Patrick E. Lendrum, Jesse Newby, Howard Quigley, Derek Craighead
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083375
Abstract: We tested for seasonal differences in cougar (Puma concolor) foraging behaviors in the Southern Yellowstone Ecosystem, a multi-prey system in which ungulate prey migrate, and cougars do not. We recorded 411 winter prey and 239 summer prey killed by 28 female and 10 male cougars, and an additional 37 prey items by unmarked cougars. Deer composed 42.4% of summer cougar diets but only 7.2% of winter diets. Males and females, however, selected different proportions of different prey; male cougars selected more elk (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces alces) than females, while females killed greater proportions of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and small prey than males. Kill rates did not vary by season or between males and females. In winter, cougars were more likely to kill prey on the landscape as: 1) elevation decreased, 2) distance to edge habitat decreased, 3) distance to large bodies of water decreased, and 4) steepness increased, whereas in summer, cougars were more likely to kill in areas as: 1) elevation decreased, 2) distance to edge habitat decreased, and 3) distance from large bodies of water increased. Our work highlighted that seasonal prey selection exhibited by stationary carnivores in systems with migratory prey is not only driven by changing prey vulnerability, but also by changing prey abundances. Elk and deer migrations may also be sustaining stationary cougar populations and creating apparent competition scenarios that result in higher predation rates on migratory bighorn sheep in winter and pronghorn in summer. Nevertheless, cougar predation on rare ungulates also appeared to be influenced by individual prey selection.
Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician
Raymond Quigley
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/943904
Abstract: Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process.
Welcome to Computers––A New Open Access Journal for Computer Science
Aaron Quigley
Computers , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/computers1010001
Abstract: For the past seven decades, computers have radically changed the world we live in. From machines for calculation, computers are now platforms for information processing and computation, supporting the entire spectrum of human endeavour. While computer science is a relatively young field, it is shaping how people live in our modern world. There is not an area of human society that has not been affected by computers and the power they afford us. Computer science touches on every facet of science, art, engineering and economics. Its impact ranges from electronic commerce to improved medical devices; and from enhanced communication to new forms of media and entertainment. The future, with ubiquitous computational power and natural user interfaces, will extend and enhance all human capabilities. To reach this future we need to quickly and freely disseminate our cutting edge research results globally, and this journal aims to help us achieve that. [...]
Changing face of irritable bowel syndrome
Quigley E
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2006,
Abstract: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in our understanding of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is evident that this is a truly global disease associated with significant symptoms and impairments in personal and social functioning for afflicted individuals. Advances in our understanding of gut flora-mucosal interactions, the enteric nervous system and the brain-gut axis have led to substantial progress in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS and have provided some hints towards the basic etiology of this disorder, in some subpopulations, at the very least. We look forward to a time when therapy will be addressed to pathophysiology and perhaps, even to primary etiology. In the meantime, a model based on a primary role for intestinal inflammation serves to integrate the various strands, which contribute to the presentation of IBS.
Globalization and Science Education: The Implications for Indigenous Knowledge Systems
Cassie Quigley
International Education Studies , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v2n1p76
Abstract: Much of the current diversity literature in science education does not address the complexity of the issues of indigenous learners in their postcolonial environments and calls for a “one size fits all” instructional approach (Lee, 2001). Indigenous knowledge needs to be promoted and supported. There is currently a global initiative of maintaining worldviews, languages, and environments of which science education can be a part (McKinley, 2007). This paper is organized around five main topics that further guide the theoretical framework for this important area: a) describing postcolonialism and indigeneity related to science education, b) defining the terms indigenous knowledge, traditional ecological knowledge, c) western modern science and the effects of globalization on these terms d) examining the research on learning implications of IK and/or TEK in classrooms with a focus on the research into student learning in indigenous language, e) connecting place-based education to curricular implications for indigenous knowledge systems.
Contributions of the Professional, Public, and Private Sectors in Promoting Patient Safety
Quigley, E
Online Journal of Issues in Nursing , 2003,
Abstract: Patient safety has become a national priority. This article discusses the contributions of the professional, public, and private sectors regarding patient safety. Definitions and detailed examination of the issues surrounding patient safety are presented. Ideas to create improved systems for the important issue of patient safety are explored. The opportunity for increased interaction among the various groups has great potential. Health care organizations that exemplify best practices in patient safety will be rewarded by the purchasers of health care and by accreditation agencies. The Leapfrog Group and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations are leading this effort. Nursing has a major role in leading efforts to find solutions to advance patient safety standards.
Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician
Raymond Quigley
International Journal of Pediatrics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/943904
Abstract: Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process. 1. Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) had originally been defined as a glomerular filtration rate less than 60?mL/minute/ 1.73?m2 for a duration of 3 months or longer. This distinguished chronic kidney disease from episodes of acute kidney injury. For purposes of classification and treatment, the National Kidney Foundation developed a staging system for CKD based upon the patient's glomerular filtration rate (Table 1) [1]. Most of the data regarding the epidemiology and etiology of chronic kidney disease is based upon the adult population. However, there have been some studies recently that have begun to examine the epidemiology and etiology of chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population [2, 3]. This paper will examine the pathophysiology and epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in pediatrics. We will discuss the workup and management of these children from the perspective of a general pediatrician. Table 1: Stages of CKD as related to the GFR of the patient. 2. Pathophysiology As the kidney function in the patient deteriorates, there are a number of pathophysiologic problems that develop in the patient. These will be reviewed according to the various organ systems that are affected. It will be important to consider the stage of chronic kidney disease that patient is in when thinking about these disorders. One of the first problems that develop is related to bone disease [4]. The kidney plays a crucial role in activating vitamin D. The liver performs the 25-hydroxylation function, and the kidney performs the 1-alpha hydroxylation step. The 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D that is formed is the most active form of vitamin D and will maintain healthy bones and prevent rickets in the growing
Mirror Symmetry in Physics: The Basics
Callum Quigley
Mathematics , 2014, DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-2830-9
Abstract: These notes are aimed at mathematicians working on topics related to mirror symmetry, but are unfamiliar with the physical origins of this subject. We explain the physical concepts that enable this surprising duality to exist, using the torus as an illustrative example. Then, we develop the basic foundations of conformal field theory so that we can explain how mirror symmetry was first discovered in that context. Along the way we will uncover a deep connection between conformal field theories with (2,2) supersymmetry and Calabi-Yau manifolds. (Based on lectures given during the "Thematic Program on Calabi-Yau Varieties: Arithmetic, Geometry and Physics" at the Fields Institute in Toronto, October 10-11, 2013.)
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