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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 451 matches for " Hamish McManus "
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Linguistic Brilliance: Rule of Law with Chinese Characteristics  [PDF]
Hamish McCardle
Beijing Law Review (BLR) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/blr.2019.102017
Abstract: Rule of law discourse has been excited in recent years with China’s reemergence as a state with global influence and its own interpretation of rule of law; a socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics. If rule of law is to become a main theme of China’s socialist justice system building in the next ten-year period, then some of the changes will necessarily reach well beyond China’s internal system, potentially internationally. In terms of China’s approach, it is possible to understand that developments of rule of law are being made with due recognition of exactly how much implementation work is actually required to shift the country forward. China’s progress towards a socialist rule of law with Chinese characteristics will almost certainly be slow, measured and most importantly completed on China’s terms, not the West’s terms.
The Significance of HIV ‘Blips’ in Resource-Limited Settings: Is It the Same? Analysis of the Treat Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD) and the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD)
Rupa Kanapathipillai, Hamish McManus, Adeeba Kamarulzaman, Poh Lian Lim, David J. Templeton, Matthew Law, Ian Woolley
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086122
Abstract: Introduction Magnitude and frequency of HIV viral load blips in resource-limited settings, has not previously been assessed. This study was undertaken in a cohort from a high income country (Australia) known as AHOD (Australian HIV Observational Database) and another cohort from a mixture of Asian countries of varying national income per capita, TAHOD (TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database). Methods Blips were defined as detectable VL (≥ 50 copies/mL) preceded and followed by undetectable VL (<50 copies/mL). Virological failure (VF) was defined as two consecutive VL ≥50 copies/ml. Cox proportional hazard models of time to first VF after entry, were developed. Results 5040 patients (AHOD n = 2597 and TAHOD n = 2521) were included; 910 (18%) of patients experienced blips. 744 (21%) and 166 (11%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips ever. 711 (14%) experienced blips prior to virological failure. 559 (16%) and 152 (10%) of high- and middle/low-income participants, respectively, experienced blips prior to virological failure. VL testing occurred at a median frequency of 175 and 91 days in middle/low- and high-income sites, respectively. Longer time to VF occurred in middle/low income sites, compared with high-income sites (adjusted hazards ratio (AHR) 0.41; p<0.001), adjusted for year of first cART, Hepatitis C co-infection, cART regimen, and prior blips. Prior blips were not a significant predictor of VF in univariate analysis (AHR 0.97, p = 0.82). Differing magnitudes of blips were not significant in univariate analyses as predictors of virological failure (p = 0.360 for blip 50–≤1000, p = 0.309 for blip 50–≤400 and p = 0.300 for blip 50–≤200). 209 of 866 (24%) patients were switched to an alternate regimen in the setting of a blip. Conclusion Despite a lower proportion of blips occurring in low/middle-income settings, no significant difference was found between settings. Nonetheless, a substantial number of participants were switched to alternative regimens in the setting of blips.
Long-Term Survival in HIV Positive Patients with up to 15 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy
Hamish McManus,Catherine C. O'Connor,Mark Boyd,Jennifer Broom,Darren Russell,Kerrie Watson,Norman Roth,Phillip J. Read,Kathy Petoumenos,Matthew G. Law
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048839
Abstract: Life expectancy has increased for newly diagnosed HIV patients since the inception of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART), but there remains a need to better understand the characteristics of long-term survival in HIV-positive patients. We examined long-term survival in HIV-positive patients receiving cART in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD), to describe changes in mortality compared to the general population and to develop longer-term survival models.
Local Immune Responses of the Chinese Water Buffalo, Bubalus bubalis, against Schistosoma japonicum Larvae: Crucial Insights for Vaccine Design
Hamish E. G. McWilliam ,David Piedrafita,Yuesheng Li,Mao Zheng,Yongkang He,Xinling Yu,Donald P. McManus,Els N. T. Meeusen
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002460
Abstract: Asian schistosomiasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease infecting up to a million people and threatening tens of millions more. Control of this disease is hindered by the animal reservoirs of the parasite, in particular the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), which is responsible for significant levels of human transmission. A transmission-blocking vaccine administered to buffaloes is a realistic option which would aid in the control of schistosomiasis. This will however require a better understanding of the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in naturally exposed buffaloes, particularly the immune response to migrating schistosome larvae, which are the likely targets of an anti-schistosome vaccine. To address this need we investigated the immune response at the major sites of larval migration, the skin and the lungs, in previously exposed and re-challenged water buffaloes. In the skin, a strong allergic-type inflammatory response occurred, characterised by leukocyte and eosinophil infiltration including the formation of granulocytic abscesses. Additionally at the local skin site, interleukin-5 transcript levels were elevated, while interleukin-10 levels decreased. In the skin-draining lymph node (LN) a predominant type-2 profile was seen in stimulated cells, while in contrast a type-1 profile was detected in the lung draining LN, and these responses occurred consecutively, reflecting the timing of parasite migration. The intense type-2 immune response at the site of cercarial penetration is significantly different to that seen in naive and permissive animal models such as mice, and suggests a possible mechanism for immunity. Preliminary data also suggest a reduced and delayed immune response occurred in buffaloes given high cercarial challenge doses compared with moderate infections, particularly in the skin. This study offers a deeper understanding into the immunobiology of schistosomiasis in a natural host, which may aid in the future design of more effective vaccines.
Innovation and Co-Creation Process within a Service Context: A Matter of Choice or Necessity?  [PDF]
John McManus, Barry Ardley
Open Journal of Business and Management (OJBM) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/ojbm.2019.71002
Abstract:
The notion of service ought to be embedded in the psyche of those responsi-ble for the design and delivery of service provision. Within an ever changing landscape, meeting customer expectations is a major priority for firms en-gaged in service provision. Enhancing the service experience lies in the con-text of innovation and entrepreneurship. The focus of innovation within business should take into consideration the unexpected, the nature of incon-gruities, process need and changes to structure. Innovation within service industries is widely recognised among researchers and practitioners as a key to gaining and sustaining competitive advantage. Increasingly, firms within service industries are placing new knowledge at the core of their strategies, especially knowledge about co-creation processes, knowledge of innovation and service design. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to explore the linkages between service development and co-creation processes to better understand the complexity of service innovation. The paper will first outline the notion of service and the context of service innovation. It will present a summarised view for management of service innovation. The paper will then move to illustrating how the creation and use of co-creation processes can be used to provide a shared understanding of what constitutes best practice.
What transcripts are found in a human cell?
Hamish Scott
Genome Biology , 2000, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2000-1-1-reports031
Abstract: A total of 3.5 million transcripts was analyzed from 19 tissues (both normal and diseased, mainly cancer cell lines or primary tumor samples). From this, the number of genes in the human genome was estimated at around 84,000. The average number of different but related transcripts corresponding to each gene is 1.6 (134,135 transcripts total, mainly due to differences in polyadenylation). More than 43,000 transcripts were expressed in a single cell type (colorectal cancer cell lines) with expression levels ranging from 0.3 to 9,417 copies of the transcript per cell. Of the transcripts, 83% were present at levels as low as one copy per cell; 55 transcripts present at over 500 copies per cell made up 18% of the cellular mRNA mass (Figure 1a); and the most highly expressed 633 genes accounted for 45% of the cellular mRNA. Most unique transcripts were produced at low levels, with just under 25% of the cellular mRNA mass being made up of 94% of the unique transcripts (Figure 1b). Approximately 9,000 genes of known function and 63,000 genes of unknown function were matched to the transcripts; the remaining transcript tags, mainly from genes expressed at a low level (46%), had no matches in existing (public) databases (Figure 1c). Differences in gene expression between different cell types were greater than the changes in gene expression observed in different physiological states of a given cell type. Expression levels of tissue-specific transcripts present at more than ten copies per cell ranged from 0.05% to 1.76% (as a percentage of total cellular mRNA), and 50% of these transcripts had no database match. Approximately 1,000 'ubiquitously' expressed transcripts were detected and may be viewed as a minimal transcriptome.More information about SAGE is available from the Serial analysis of gene expression homepage and the SAGEmap site at the National Center for Biotechnological Information (NCBI). For information on cDNA microarray technology visit the Gene Chips (DNA Micro
Listening to the Learner: A Qualitative Investigation of Motivation for Embracing or Avoiding the Use of Self-Access Centres
Hamish Gillies
Studies in Self-Access Learning Journal , 2010,
Abstract: This paper reports on a follow-up study to Gillies (2007), in which a survey was conducted to investigate how tertiary-level Japanese EFL students understand and interpret their use or non-use of their institution’s self-access centre (SAC). The survey data revealed general trends regarding the factors which motivate the students’ use of the SAC as well as reasons why students choose not to use it, while also suggesting four types of students, via cluster analysis. Employing Dornyei’s (2005) L2 Motivational Self System as a theoretical framework, the current paper attempts to probe deeper into the survey data, and specifically tease out the factors influencing the use or non-use of the SAC. It reports on a set of semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of nine students from amongst the survey respondents. The interviewees included representatives of each of the four clusters identified in the survey data. The interview transcripts were then subjected to coding and labelling, and key themes in the data emerged: the SAC as an environment; the SAC as a community of selves; the SAC as contrasted with the classroom. Related to these themes, it was found that in the first year of university, identities are forged, distinguishing regular SAC users and rare SAC users. The SAC is an attractive environment for students with strong ideal L2 selves, while being uncomfortable for less confident students. The former type of student is more likely to see the classroom environment as restrictive, while the latter views it as sheltered and supportive. Meanwhile, the level of English proficiency is not in itself predictive of SAC use, but rather the level of L2 motivation, in particular the strength of the learner’s ideal L2 self. The paper discusses these themes and findings, and concludes with implications for the SAC, and suggestions for making the centre accessible and appealing to a wider cross-section of the overall student body.
CASA ESSAY: CICERO: PRO CAELIO: WHAT WAS IT THAT MOST UNDERMINED CLODIA’S CASE – HER CHARACTER, THE PREJUDICES OF ROMAN MEN, THE SKILLS OF CICERO OR …?
Hamish Williams
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/52-0-58
Abstract: The paper judged to be the best student essay submitted to Akroterion by November 30, preceding publication of the volume for that specific year, is published annually as the CASA / KVSA Essay. The competition, which is sponsored by the Classical Association of South Africa, is open to undergraduate students every year and to Honours students in even-numbered years. The winner receives a cash prize of R500.
Anthropology : a science of the non-event?
Morgan, Hamish
Cultural Studies Review , 2010,
Abstract: This essay explores the notion of the ‘event’ and it relevance to ethnography and community. It has developed from research work with Aboriginal people, especially the Jackman family, in central Western Australia. The essay sketches the possibility of developing another kind of ethnographic writing, one attuned to the relation with others, one that involves being-in-common with others. It focuses on developing a writing practice that is exposed to interruption, to fragments, to little happenings and encounters, to those shared events that happen in community. The essay sees community as the place of interruption: that to be with others is to be taken off, shown something else, exposed to unique turnings of the world that others give light to trace.
Anthropology: A Science of the Non-event?
Hamish Morgan
Cultural Studies Review , 2010,
Abstract: This essay explores the notion of the ‘event’ and it relevance to ethnography and community. It has developed from research work with Aboriginal people, especially the Jackman family, in central Western Australia. The essay sketches the possibility of developing another kind of ethnographic writing, one attuned to the relation with others, one that involves being-in-common with others. It focuses on developing a writing practice that is exposed to interruption, to fragments, to little happenings and encounters, to those shared events that happen in community. The essay sees community as the place of interruption: that to be with others is to be taken off, shown something else, exposed to unique turnings of the world that others give light to trace.
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