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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 11296 matches for " George Kitsos "
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Primary open angle glaucoma and hypothyroidism
George Kitsos, Chrisavgi Pappa, Agathoklis Tsatsoulis
Clinical Optometry , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTO.S8048
Abstract: imary open angle glaucoma and hypothyroidism Original Research (5723) Total Article Views Authors: George Kitsos, Chrisavgi Pappa, Agathoklis Tsatsoulis Published Date January 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 5 - 8 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTO.S8048 George Kitsos1, Chrisavgi Pappa1, Agathoklis Tsatsoulis2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Endocrinology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Purpose: To test the hypothesis: is there an association between primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and hypothyroidism, and to establish the necessity of routine examination of thyroid function in these patients? Design: Observational cross sectional study. Materials and methods: 78 consecutive patients with a previous diagnosis of POAG and 77 control patients were evaluated for hypothyroidism. The levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxin and triiodothyronine were measured. Results: No patient had hypothyroidism and no correlation was found between glaucoma and either thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxin or triiodothyronine. Conclusion: This study determined there is no an association between glaucoma and hypothyroidism. Therefore, we believe that the systematic screening for hypothyroidism in all patients with POAG is unnecessary.
Primary open angle glaucoma and hypothyroidism
George Kitsos,Chrisavgi Pappa,Agathoklis Tsatsoulis
Clinical Optometry , 2010,
Abstract: George Kitsos1, Chrisavgi Pappa1, Agathoklis Tsatsoulis21Department of Ophthalmology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Endocrinology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GreecePurpose: To test the hypothesis: is there an association between primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and hypothyroidism, and to establish the necessity of routine examination of thyroid function in these patients?Design: Observational cross sectional study.Materials and methods: 78 consecutive patients with a previous diagnosis of POAG and 77 control patients were evaluated for hypothyroidism. The levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxin and triiodothyronine were measured.Results: No patient had hypothyroidism and no correlation was found between glaucoma and either thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxin or triiodothyronine.Conclusion: This study determined there is no an association between glaucoma and hypothyroidism. Therefore, we believe that the systematic screening for hypothyroidism in all patients with POAG is unnecessary.Keywords: primary open angle glaucoma, hypothyroidism, intraocular pressure, thyroid hormones
Primary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece
George Kitsos, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S8974
Abstract: imary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece Original Research (4156) Total Article Views Authors: George Kitsos, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou, et al Published Date March 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 171 - 178 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S8974 George Kitsos1, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou3, John R Samples4, Alex W Hewitt5, Haris Kokotas3, Aglaia Giannoulia-Karantana3, David A Mackey6, Mary K Wirtz4, Marilita Moschou7, John PA Ioannidis8, Michael B Petersen3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Ioannina “G Chatzikosta”, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Child Health, Athens, Greece; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute-OHS U, Portland, OR; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; 6Center for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 7Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 8Department Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece Background: Mutations in the MYOC gene have been shown to explain 5% of unrelated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in different populations. In particular, the T377M MYOC mutation has arisen at least three separate times in history, in Great Britain, India, and Greece. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of the mutation among different population groups in the northwestern region of Greece. Materials and methods: We explored the distribution of the “Greek” T377M founder mutation in the Epirus region in Northwestern Greece, which could be its origin. Genotyping was performed in POAG cases and controls by PCR amplification of the MYOC gene, followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. Statistical analyses were performed by an exact test, the Kaplan–Meier method and the t-test. Results: In the isolated Chrysovitsa village in the Pindus Mountains, a large POAG family demonstrated the T377M mutation in 20 of 66 family members while no controls from the Epirus region (n = 124) carried this mutation (P < 0.001). Among other POAG cases from Epirus, 2 out of 14 familial cases and 1 out of 80 sporadic cases showed the mutation (P = 0.057). The probability of POAG diagnosis with advancing age among mutation carriers was 23% at age 40, and reached 100% at age 75. POAG patients with the T377M mutation were diagnosed at a mean age of 51 years (SD ± 13.9), which is younger than the sporadic or familial POAG cases: 63.1 (SD ± 11) and 66.8 (SD ± 9.8) years, respectively. Conclusions: The T377M mutation was found in high proportion in members of the Chrysovitsa family (30.3%), in lower proportion in familial POAG cases (14.2%) and seems rare in sporadic POAG cases (1.2%), while no controls (0%) from the
Periocular xanthogranuloma: A forgotten entity?
Charalampos Papagoras, George Kitsos, Paraskevi V Voulgari, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S9369
Abstract: iocular xanthogranuloma: A forgotten entity? Case report (4835) Total Article Views Authors: Charalampos Papagoras, George Kitsos, Paraskevi V Voulgari, et al Published Date March 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 105 - 110 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S9369 Charalampos Papagoras1, George Kitsos2, Paraskevi V Voulgari1, Anastasia K Zikou3, Maria I Argyropoulou3, Aikaterini Zioga4, Alexandros A Drosos1 1Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine; 2Department of Ophthalmology; 3Department of Clinical Imaging and Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Abstract: Periocular xanthogranulomatous diseases are a rare group of disorders which are characterized by a predilection to affect the orbit and ocular adnexa and special histopathological features, in particular infiltrates comprising non-Langerhans-derived foamy histiocytes and Touton giant cells. The differential diagnosis is difficult and occasionally definite diagnosis cannot be established even after clinical and histopathological findings are taken together. We describe a case of a middle-aged man who presented with a 10-year history of voluminous eyelid swelling with concomitant late-onset atopic manifestations, namely bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis with nasal polyps. After thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, including a biopsy of the eyelid, we classified the patient’s disease to a rare entity that has been relatively recently described: periocular xanthogranuloma associated with adult-onset asthma. In a review of the literature, no prospective trials concerning the treatment of this disease were found. The literature mainly contained case reports and case series in which corticosteroids and chemotherapy with alkylating agents have been reported to be beneficial. We treated our patient with a combination of oral corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide pulses and we observed substantial regression of the eyelid masses together with a normalization of systemic immunologic abnormalities.
A modified deep sclerectomy with or without external trabeculectomy: a comparative study
George Kitsos, Miltiades Aspiotis, Yannis Alamanos, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S10350
Abstract: modified deep sclerectomy with or without external trabeculectomy: a comparative study Original Research (3047) Total Article Views Authors: George Kitsos, Miltiades Aspiotis, Yannis Alamanos, et al Published Date June 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 557 - 564 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S10350 George Kitsos1, Miltiades Aspiotis1, Yannis Alamanos2, Konstantinos Psilas1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras, Greece Purpose: To determine whether the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (external trabeculectomy) improves the effectiveness of a modified method of deep sclerectomy (DS), which we will call “reversed” deep sclerectomy (RDS). Materials and method: We conducted a prospective study of two groups of patients. Group A included 22 eyes of 18 patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) under maximum medical treatment, which underwent RDS – a modified method of performing DS – with the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (external trabeculectomy) and without using any implant. Group B included 20 eyes of 17 patients which had undergone RDS alone. Demographic and tonometric data of patients of Group A revealed no significant difference from data of patients in Group B. A mean follow up period for Group A was 22.8 months and for Group B was 23.4 months. The outcome of the operations was termed a total success when intraocular pressure (IOP) was <21 mmHg postoperatively, without additional treatment, relative success when IOP was <21 mmHg with additional treatment and a total failure when IOP > 21 mmHg with medical treatment. Results: Total success was achieved in 18/22 eyes (81.8%) for Group A and in 8/20 eyes (40%) for Group B (P < 0.05). Relative success was achieved in 22/22 (100%) for Group A and in 17/20 eyes (85%) in Group B (P = NS). Total failure occurred in 0/22 eyes (0%) in Group A and in 3/20 (15%) eyes in Group B (P = NS). The mean postoperative IOP in Group A was 13.5 ± 2.8 mmHg with a reduction of 12.4 ± 4.6 mmHg (48.1%) and in Group B mean postoperative IOP was 18 ± 4.3 mmHg with a reduction of 6.2 ± 6.9 (25.6%) (P < 0.001). Mean drug reduction postoperatively was 3.2 ± 0.9 drugs in Group A and 1.7 ± 1.2 in Group B (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In the follow up time during which the two groups were under study (12–36 months), the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal while performing RDS proves an important factor in improving its effectiveness.
Results of a modified non-penetrating deep sclerectomy in the treatment of open angle glaucoma with or without cataract
George Kitsos, Miltiades Aspiotis, Yannis Alamanos, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S11903
Abstract: ults of a modified non-penetrating deep sclerectomy in the treatment of open angle glaucoma with or without cataract Original Research (2950) Total Article Views Authors: George Kitsos, Miltiades Aspiotis, Yannis Alamanos, et al Published Date June 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 695 - 701 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S11903 George Kitsos1, Miltiades Aspiotis1, Yannis Alamanos2, Konstantinos Psilas1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras, Greece Purpose: To present the technique of a modified deep sclerectomy, which we will call “reversed” deep sclerectomy (RDS) and the results and our observations of its use in patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) and with or without cataract extraction (phacoemulsification). Materials and methods: This prospective study included 132 eyes which underwent RDS: 37 eyes (group A) with uncontrolled OAG and 95 eyes (group B) with OAG and visually significant cataract. Mean pressure preoperatively for group A was 24.48 ± 4.92 mmHg and for group B was 22.99 ± 3.00. The mean number of antiglaucoma drugs received was 2.97 ± 0.69 and 2.56 ± 0.73 for groups A and B respectively. The RDS was performed where the deep scleral stroma is prepared in 2 parts, folded and inserted under the lateral sides of the sclerectomy, and the Schlemm’s canal is opened prior to deep scleral stroma preparation. Cataract was extracted by phacoemulsification through the same scleral opening. The follow-up for group A was 22.23 ± 10.18 months and for group B, 25.36 ± 10.12 months. Results: Postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) ≤ 21 mmHg was achieved for group A in 40.5% without antiglaucoma drugs and 94.6% with antiglaucoma drugs, and for group B in 66.3% and in 94.7% respectively. Mean IOP reduction was 7.02 ± 6.35 mmHg (28.67%, P < 0.05) for group A and 5.26 ± 3.72 mmHg (25.06%, P ≤ 0.05) for group B, while mean drug reduction was 1.97 ± 1.09 (P < 0.01) and 2.14 ± 0.95 (P ≤ 0.01) respectively. 5-Fluorouracil was used in 8 eyes of group A and in 5 eyes of group B. Conclusion: In the follow-up time during which the two groups were under study, the RDS was effective with a few complications, similar to the classic deep sclerectomy using implants or not, with the advantage, in our opinion, of a short learning curve.
Results of a modified non-penetrating deep sclerectomy in the treatment of open angle glaucoma with or without cataract
George Kitsos,Miltiades Aspiotis,Yannis Alamanos,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: George Kitsos1, Miltiades Aspiotis1, Yannis Alamanos2, Konstantinos Psilas11Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras, GreecePurpose: To present the technique of a modified deep sclerectomy, which we will call “reversed” deep sclerectomy (RDS) and the results and our observations of its use in patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) and with or without cataract extraction (phacoemulsification).Materials and methods: This prospective study included 132 eyes which underwent RDS: 37 eyes (group A) with uncontrolled OAG and 95 eyes (group B) with OAG and visually significant cataract. Mean pressure preoperatively for group A was 24.48 ± 4.92 mmHg and for group B was 22.99 ± 3.00. The mean number of antiglaucoma drugs received was 2.97 ± 0.69 and 2.56 ± 0.73 for groups A and B respectively. The RDS was performed where the deep scleral stroma is prepared in 2 parts, folded and inserted under the lateral sides of the sclerectomy, and the Schlemm’s canal is opened prior to deep scleral stroma preparation. Cataract was extracted by phacoemulsification through the same scleral opening. The follow-up for group A was 22.23 ± 10.18 months and for group B, 25.36 ± 10.12 months. Results: Postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) ≤ 21 mmHg was achieved for group A in 40.5% without antiglaucoma drugs and 94.6% with antiglaucoma drugs, and for group B in 66.3% and in 94.7% respectively. Mean IOP reduction was 7.02 ± 6.35 mmHg (28.67%, P < 0.05) for group A and 5.26 ± 3.72 mmHg (25.06%, P ≤ 0.05) for group B, while mean drug reduction was 1.97 ± 1.09 (P < 0.01) and 2.14 ± 0.95 (P ≤ 0.01) respectively. 5-Fluorouracil was used in 8 eyes of group A and in 5 eyes of group B.Conclusion: In the follow-up time during which the two groups were under study, the RDS was effective with a few complications, similar to the classic deep sclerectomy using implants or not, with the advantage, in our opinion, of a short learning curve.Keywords: modified deep sclerectomy, cataract
Primary open angle glaucoma due to T377M MYOC: Population mapping of a Greek founder mutation in Northwestern Greece
George Kitsos,Zacharias Petrou2,Maria Grigoriadou,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: George Kitsos1, Zacharias Petrou2, Maria Grigoriadou3, John R Samples4, Alex W Hewitt5, Haris Kokotas3, Aglaia Giannoulia-Karantana3, David A Mackey6, Mary K Wirtz4, Marilita Moschou7, John PA Ioannidis8, Michael B Petersen31Department of Ophthalmology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, General Hospital of Ioannina “G Chatzikosta”, Ioannina, Greece; 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Child Health, Athens, Greece; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute-OHS U, Portland, OR; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; 6Center for Eye Research Australia, University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 7Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, Athens, Greece; 8Department Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina, School of Medicine, Ioannina, GreeceBackground: Mutations in the MYOC gene have been shown to explain 5% of unrelated primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in different populations. In particular, the T377M MYOC mutation has arisen at least three separate times in history, in Great Britain, India, and Greece. The purpose of this study is to investigate the distribution of the mutation among different population groups in the northwestern region of Greece.Materials and methods: We explored the distribution of the “Greek” T377M founder mutation in the Epirus region in Northwestern Greece, which could be its origin. Genotyping was performed in POAG cases and controls by PCR amplification of the MYOC gene, followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. Statistical analyses were performed by an exact test, the Kaplan–Meier method and the t-test.Results: In the isolated Chrysovitsa village in the Pindus Mountains, a large POAG family demonstrated the T377M mutation in 20 of 66 family members while no controls from the Epirus region (n = 124) carried this mutation (P < 0.001). Among other POAG cases from Epirus, 2 out of 14 familial cases and 1 out of 80 sporadic cases showed the mutation (P = 0.057). The probability of POAG diagnosis with advancing age among mutation carriers was 23% at age 40, and reached 100% at age 75. POAG patients with the T377M mutation were diagnosed at a mean age of 51 years (SD ± 13.9), which is younger than the sporadic or familial POAG cases: 63.1 (SD ± 11) and 66.8 (SD ± 9.8) years, respectively.Conclusions: The T377M mutation was found in high proportion in members of the Chrysovitsa family (30.3%), in lower proportion in familial POAG cases (14.2%) and seem
Periocular xanthogranuloma: A forgotten entity?
Charalampos Papagoras,George Kitsos,Paraskevi V Voulgari,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: Charalampos Papagoras1, George Kitsos2, Paraskevi V Voulgari1, Anastasia K Zikou3, Maria I Argyropoulou3, Aikaterini Zioga4, Alexandros A Drosos11Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine; 2Department of Ophthalmology; 3Department of Clinical Imaging and Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GreeceAbstract: Periocular xanthogranulomatous diseases are a rare group of disorders which are characterized by a predilection to affect the orbit and ocular adnexa and special histopathological features, in particular infiltrates comprising non-Langerhans-derived foamy histiocytes and Touton giant cells. The differential diagnosis is difficult and occasionally definite diagnosis cannot be established even after clinical and histopathological findings are taken together. We describe a case of a middle-aged man who presented with a 10-year history of voluminous eyelid swelling with concomitant late-onset atopic manifestations, namely bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis with nasal polyps. After thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, including a biopsy of the eyelid, we classified the patient’s disease to a rare entity that has been relatively recently described: periocular xanthogranuloma associated with adult-onset asthma. In a review of the literature, no prospective trials concerning the treatment of this disease were found. The literature mainly contained case reports and case series in which corticosteroids and chemotherapy with alkylating agents have been reported to be beneficial. We treated our patient with a combination of oral corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide pulses and we observed substantial regression of the eyelid masses together with a normalization of systemic immunologic abnormalities.Keywords: periocular xanthogranuloma, adult-onset asthma, non-Langerhans histiocytoses, cyclophosphamide, methylprednisolone
A modified deep sclerectomy with or without external trabeculectomy: a comparative study
George Kitsos,Miltiades Aspiotis,Yannis Alamanos,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: George Kitsos1, Miltiades Aspiotis1, Yannis Alamanos2, Konstantinos Psilas11Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras, GreecePurpose: To determine whether the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (external trabeculectomy) improves the effectiveness of a modified method of deep sclerectomy (DS), which we will call “reversed” deep sclerectomy (RDS).Materials and method: We conducted a prospective study of two groups of patients. Group A included 22 eyes of 18 patients with open angle glaucoma (OAG) under maximum medical treatment, which underwent RDS – a modified method of performing DS – with the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (external trabeculectomy) and without using any implant. Group B included 20 eyes of 17 patients which had undergone RDS alone. Demographic and tonometric data of patients of Group A revealed no significant difference from data of patients in Group B. A mean follow up period for Group A was 22.8 months and for Group B was 23.4 months. The outcome of the operations was termed a total success when intraocular pressure (IOP) was <21 mmHg postoperatively, without additional treatment, relative success when IOP was <21 mmHg with additional treatment and a total failure when IOP > 21 mmHg with medical treatment.Results: Total success was achieved in 18/22 eyes (81.8%) for Group A and in 8/20 eyes (40%) for Group B (P < 0.05). Relative success was achieved in 22/22 (100%) for Group A and in 17/20 eyes (85%) in Group B (P = NS). Total failure occurred in 0/22 eyes (0%) in Group A and in 3/20 (15%) eyes in Group B (P = NS). The mean postoperative IOP in Group A was 13.5 ± 2.8 mmHg with a reduction of 12.4 ± 4.6 mmHg (48.1%) and in Group B mean postoperative IOP was 18 ± 4.3 mmHg with a reduction of 6.2 ± 6.9 (25.6%) (P < 0.001). Mean drug reduction postoperatively was 3.2 ± 0.9 drugs in Group A and 1.7 ± 1.2 in Group B (P < 0.001).Conclusion: In the follow up time during which the two groups were under study (12–36 months), the removal of the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal while performing RDS proves an important factor in improving its effectiveness.Keywords: modified deep sclerectomy, external trabeculectomy
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