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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 190099 matches for " G Davey "
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Inputs to the hormonal control of egg development in Rhodnius prolixus
Davey, K. G.;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1987, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02761987000700020
Abstract: this paper re-examines existing data on the environmental inputs governing egg production in rhodnius prolixus. feeding has a direct effect on egg production such that the product of the unfed weight of the female times the weight of the blood meal is a good predictor of the number of eggs produced. mating modifies this input, so that mated females produce more eggs. egg production is governed by the corpus allatum, and indirect evidence suggests that the number of eggs producted by a female is a function of the length of time that juvenile hormone is secreted by the corpus allatum. the input which determines the times at which the corpus allatum is switched off originates in the stretch induced by the amount of the meal remaining in the crop, modified by the matedness status of the female. the precise nature of the sensors detecting stretch is not yet clear, but the integrity of the dorsal aorta is essential to the transmission of the information. these data are related to the survival strategy for rhodnius.
Adherence to ART in PLWHA and Yirgalem Hospital, South Ethiopia
E Markos, A Worku, G Davey
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2008,
Abstract:
Byssinosis and other respiratory symptoms among factory workers in Akaki textile factory, Ethiopia
K Alemu, A Kumie, G Davey
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2010,
Abstract: Background: Textile cotton workers are at risk for occupational lung disease, including Byssinosis and chronic Bronchitis. Byssinosis is primarily associated with exposure to cotton dust. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with byssinosis and respiratory symptoms among workers in cotton mills of Akaki textile factory. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 417 randomly selected factory workers. Information was collected through interview using the modified American Thoracic Society standard respiratory symptoms questionnaires. Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC ratio were measured using portable medical spirometers. Area sampling for cotton dust concentration in the work environment was measured using Data RAM 4 real time measurement for 8 hours during a day shift. Results: The highest prevalence of respiratory symptoms was found in the carding section - cough 77%, phlegm 62%, chest tightness 46% and dyspnea 62%. The Overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 32%. Those working in the carding section appeared 13 times more likely to have chronic bronchitis compared to other sections (Adjusted OR=13.4, 95% CI 3.43-52.6). The prevalence of byssinosis was 38%; the highest being recorded in the carding section at 84.6%. High exposure to cotton dust was noted among those in the blowing and carding section at mean dust levels of 32.2 mg/m3 and 8 mg/m3, respectively. About 11% of byssinotics developed severe chronic FEV1 changes. Conclusion: This study provides evidence of a strong relationship between exposure to cotton dust and byssinosis and other respiratory impairments, which is mediated through chronic ventilator impairments. Preventive measures are warranted in order to reduce the high prevalence of byssinosis and other respiratory disorders in textile manufacturing. [Ethiop. J .Health Dev. 2010;24(2):133-139]
A case of an ectopic cervical thymic cyst  [PDF]
Simon Davey, Janet McNally
Case Reports in Clinical Medicine (CRCM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/crcm.2013.22041
Abstract:

Ectopic cervical thymic cysts are uncommon lesions and definitive preoperative diagnosis is not always possible. Surgical excision is recommended due to the small but possible chance of malignant degeneration in adulthood. We present a case of a nine year old boy with an asymptomatic lesion in his neck, discuss the differential diagnoses of such lesions and treatment considerations.

The information and support needs of patients discharged after a short hospital stay for treatment of low-risk Community Acquired Pneumonia: implications for treatment without admission
Deborah J Baldie, Vikki A Entwistle, Peter G Davey
BMC Pulmonary Medicine , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2466-8-11
Abstract: We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 15 patients who had a confirmed diagnosis of low-risk CAP and had received fewer than 3 days hospital care. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed, and data were analysed thematically.Most patients left hospital with no clear understanding of pneumonia, its treatment or follow-up and most identified additional-other specific information needs when they got home. Some were unable to independently address their activities of daily living in their first days at home.Main concerns after discharge related to the cause and implications of pneumonia, symptom trajectory and prevention of transmission. Most sought advice from their GP in their first days at home, and indicated they would have appreciated a follow-up phone call or visit to discuss their concerns.Patients' preferences for site of care varied and appeared to be influenced by beliefs about safety (fear of rapid deterioration at home or acquiring an infection in hospital), family burden, access to support, or confidence in home-care services. Those who received intravenous (IV) medication were more likely to state a preference for hospital care.Trends to support community-based treatment of CAP should be accompanied by increased attention to the information and support needs of patients who go home to self-manage. Although some information needs can be anticipated and addressed on diagnosis, specific needs often do not become apparent until patients return home, so some access to information and support in the community is likely to be necessary. Our finding that patients who received IV treatment for low-risk CAP were concerned about the relative safety of home-based care highlights the potential importance of the inferences patients make from treatment modalities, and also the need to ensure that patients' expectations and understandings are managed effectively.About 1 per 1,000 of the UK adult population is admitted to hospital with community ac
The role of men in contraceptive use and fertility preference in Hossana town, Southern Ethiopia
T Tuloro, W Deressa, A Ali, G Davey
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2006,
Abstract:
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people
Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423
Abstract: imal management of urinary tract infections in older people Review (12223) Total Article Views Authors: Beveridge L, Davey PG, Phillips G, McMurdo MET Published Date June 2011 Volume 2011:6 Pages 173 - 180 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S13423 Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo1 1Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS Tayside Abstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.
Flood and Draught Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time System for Mahasarakham Province
W. Kanarkard,W. Taweepworadej,R.G. Adams,N. Davey
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract:
A Comparison of Detection Performance for Several Track-before-Detect Algorithms
Samuel J. Davey,Mark G. Rutten,Brian Cheung
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing , 2007, DOI: 10.1155/2008/428036
Abstract: A typical sensor data processing sequence uses a detection algorithm prior to tracking to extract point measurements from the observed sensor data. Track before detect (TBD) is a paradigm which combines target detection and estimation by removing the detection algorithm and supplying the sensor data directly to the tracker. Various different approaches exist for tackling the TBD problem. This article compares the ability of several different approaches to detect low amplitude targets. The following algorithms are considered in this comparison: Bayesian estimation over a discrete grid, dynamic programming, particle filtering methods, and the histogram probabilistic multihypothesis tracker. Algorithms are compared on the basis of detection performance and computation resource requirements.
Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people
Beveridge L,Davey PG,Phillips G,McMurdo MET
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2011,
Abstract: Louise A Beveridge1, Peter G Davey2, Gabby Phillips3, Marion ET McMurdo11Ageing and Health, Division of Medical Sciences, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, 2Health Informatics Centre, University of Dundee, 3Medical Microbiology Department, NHS TaysideAbstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.Keywords: urinary tract infection, elderly, review
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