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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10096 matches for " Frank Hummel "
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Early postoperative therapy after heart transplantation: Prophylaxis, diagnosis and antibiotic, antimycotic and antiviral therapy of infections
M. Hummel
Transplantationsmedizin , 2011,
Abstract: Aside from early graft failure, infections are the second leading cause of death after heart transplantation (HTx). Therefore, prophylaxis, diagnosis and adequate therapy of infections are fundamental for the short and long-term success of heart transplantation. Because immunosuppressive drug therapy is a prerequisite for transplantation, the range of infection is much larger than after other kinds of major thoracic operation. For prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy, bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal infections have to be taken into account, also as part of opportunistic infection. So far evidence-based recommendations for the prophylaxis and therapy of infections after HTx are rare. Therefore, it is necessary to use clinically proven strategies to prevent and treat infections.
Early postoperative therapy after heart transplantation: Prophylaxis, diagnosis and antibiotic, antimycotic and antiviral therapy of infections
M. Hummel
Applied Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology , 2011,
Abstract: Aside from early graft failure, infections are the second leading cause of death after heart transplantation (HTx). Therefore, prophylaxis, diagnosis and adequate therapy of infections are fundamental for the short and long-term success of heart transplantation. Because immunosuppressive drug therapy is a prerequisite for transplantation, the range of infection is much larger than after other kinds of major thoracic operation. For prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy, bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal infections have to be taken into account, also as part of opportunistic infection. So far evidence-based recommendations for the prophylaxis and therapy of infections after HTx are rare. Therefore, it is necessary to use clinically proven strategies to prevent and treat infections.
Unambiguous Tree Languages Are Topologically Harder Than Deterministic Ones
Szczepan Hummel
Electronic Proceedings in Theoretical Computer Science , 2012, DOI: 10.4204/eptcs.96.19
Abstract: The paper gives an example of a tree language G that is recognised by an unambiguous parity automaton and is analytic-complete as a set in Cantor space. This already shows that the unambiguous languages are topologically more complex than the deterministic ones, that are all coanalytic. Using set G as a building block we construct an unambiguous language that is topologically harder than any countable boolean combination of analytic and coanalytic sets. In particular the language is harder than any set in difference hierarchy of analytic sets considered by O.Finkel and P.Simonnet in the context of nondeterministic automata.
Adjacent Pairs Exchange correction to the Random Phase Approximation
Felix Hummel
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The Random Phase Approximation (RPA) is a widely employed post Hartree-Fock or DFT method, capable of capturing van der Waal interactions and other dynamic correlation effects at relatively low costs of $\mathcal O(N^3)$ in time and $\mathcal O(N^2)$ in memory, if calculated from imaginary time propagators. However, since it neglects anti-symmetrization RPA is biased, overestimating the correlation energy and bond lengths in general. The Second Order Screened Exchange offers amelioration by anti-symmetrizing one Coulomb interaction but it comes at considerable costs of $\mathcal O(N^5)$ in time and $\mathcal O(N^4)$ in memory, since it has to be calculated from the direct ring Coupled Cluster Doubles (drCCD) amplitudes. We propose a diagrammatic method, exchanging adjacent pairs in the RPA diagrams - hence its name - offering similar accuracy but with memory requirement of only $\mathcal O(N^2)$. The correction is calculated from imaginary time propagators similar to efficient RPA implementations. It can be calculated in $\mathcal O(N^5)$ steps in momentum space or $\mathcal O(N^4)$ steps in real space. It improves on SOSEX in the uniform electron gas for low densities, where correlation effects are stronger, and first calculations of lattice constants in solids are in excellent agreement with experiment.
On consecutive quadratic non-residues: a conjecture of Issai Schur
Patrick Hummel
Mathematics , 2003,
Abstract: Issai Schur once asked if it was possible to determine a bound, preferably using elementary methods, such that for all prime numbers p greater than the bound, the greatest number of consecutive quadratic non-residues modulo p is always less than the square root of p. This paper uses elementary methods to prove that 13 is the only prime number for which the greatest number of consecutive quadratic non-residues modulo p exceeds the square root of p.
Shaping tail dependencies by nesting box copulas
Christoph Hummel
Quantitative Finance , 2009,
Abstract: We introduce a family of copulas which are locally piecewise uniform in the interior of the unit cube of any given dimension. Within that family, the simultaneous control of tail dependencies of all projections to faces of the cube is possible and we give an efficient sampling algorithm. The combination of these two properties may be appealing to risk modellers.
Prospective evaluation of small bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate for capsule endoscopy
Andreas Franke, Frank Hummel, Phillip Knebel, Christoph Antoni, Ulrich B?cker, Manfred V Singer, Matthias L?hr
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2008,
Abstract: AIM: To determine the effect of Prepacol , a combination of sodium phosphate and bisacodyl, on transit and quality of capsule endoscopy (CE).METHODS: Fivety two consecutive patients were included in this prospective study. CE was performed following a 12 h fasting period. Twenty six patients were randomized for additional preparation with Prepacol . The quality of CE was assessed separately for the proximal and the distal small bowel by 3 experienced endoscopists on the basis of a graduation which was initially developed with 20 previous CE.RESULTS: Preparation with Prepacol accelerated small bowel transit time (262 ± 55 min vs 287 ± 97 min), but had no effect on the quality of CE. Visibility was significantly reduced in the distal compared to the proximal small bowel.CONCLUSION: The significantly reduced visibility of CE in the distal small bowel allocates the need for a good preparation. Since Prepacol has no beneficial effect on CE the modality of preparation and the ideal time of application remains unclear. Further standardized examinations are necessary to identify sufficient preparation procedures and to determine the impact of the volume of the preparation solution.
A Comparison of Selected Parametric and Non-Parametric Imputation Methods for Estimating Forest Biomass and Basal Area  [PDF]
Donald Gagliasso, Susan Hummel, Hailemariam Temesgen
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2014.41008
Abstract:

Various methods have been used to estimate the amount of above ground forest biomass across landscapes and to create biomass maps for specific stands or pixels across ownership or project areas. Without an accurate estimation method, land managers might end up with incorrect biomass estimate maps, which could lead them to make poorer decisions in their future management plans. The goal of this study was to compare various imputation methods to predict forest biomass and basal area, at a project planning scale (<20,000 acres) on the Malheur National Forest, located in eastern Oregon, USA. We examined the predictive performance of linear regression, geographic weighted regression (GWR), gradient nearest neighbor (GNN), most similar neighbor (MSN), random forest imputation, and k-nearest neighbor (k-nn) to estimate biomass (tons/acre) and basal area (sq. feet per acre) across 19,000 acres on the Malheur National Forest. To test the different methods, a combination of ground inventory plots, light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, satellite imagery, and climate data was analyzed, and their root mean square error (RMSE) and bias were calculated. Results indicate that for biomass prediction, the k-nn (k = 5) had the lowest RMSE and least amount of bias. The second most accurate method consisted of the k-nn (k = 3), followed by the GWR model, and the random forest imputation. For basal area prediction, the GWR model had the lowest RMSE and least amount of bias. The second most accurate method was k-nn (k = 5), followed by k-nn (k = 3), and the random forest method. For both metrics, the GNN method was the least accurate based on the ranking of RMSE and bias.

Alanine Zipper-Like Coiled-Coil Domains Are Necessary for Homotypic Dimerization of Plant GAGA-Factors in the Nucleus and Nucleolus
Dierk Wanke,Mareike L. Hohenstatt,Marek Dynowski,Ulrich Bloss,Andreas Hecker,Kirstin Elgass,Sabine Hummel,Achim Hahn,Katharina Caesar,Frank Schleifenbaum,Klaus Harter,Kenneth W. Berendzen
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016070
Abstract: GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms.
Cardiovascular disease and intensive glucose control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: moving practice toward evidence-based strategies
Matthias Meier, Michael Hummel
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S4808
Abstract: rdiovascular disease and intensive glucose control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: moving practice toward evidence-based strategies Review (6627) Total Article Views Authors: Matthias Meier, Michael Hummel Published Date October 2009 Volume 2009:5 Pages 859 - 871 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S4808 Matthias Meier,1,2 Michael Hummel3,4 1Clinic for Hypertension and Nephrology, Hannover, Germany; 2Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Academic Hospital Schwabing, Munich, Germany; 4Diabetes Research Institute, Munich, Germany Abstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with a high risk of complications, essentially macrovascular events. Surprisingly, the effect of improved glucose control on coronary and cerebrovascular complications and the target level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in this population remains questionable. We here report the results of 4 recently published randomized controlled trials (ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, UKPDS post-trial), which did not demonstrate a significant reduction of cardiovascular events in the intensive group compared to the standard group. On the contrary, in ACCORD, the study with the most ambitious goal (HbA1c < 6%), the overall and cardiovascular mortality was greater in the intensive group, although the risk of microangiopathic complications, especially nephropathy, was significantly decreased. VADT suggests that one possibility for the lack of observed effect of intensive therapy could be that the cardiovascular benefit is delayed. This contrasts strongly with the long-term postintervention outcomes of UKPDS, which show a persistent benefit of glycemic control during 10 years of post-trial follow-up (‘legacy effect’). Therefore, the best way to protect patients with T2DM against coronary and cerebrovascular disease is to target all cardiovascular risk factors as early as possible by an individualized approach.
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