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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 92 matches for " Fitzhugh Mullan "
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Seize the Hospital to Serve the People
Fitzhugh Mullan
Social Medicine , 2007,
Abstract:
Community-Based Health Research: Issues and Methods
Ivor Horn,Fitzhugh Mullan
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2004,
Abstract:
Compulsory service programmes for recruiting health workers in remote and rural areas: do they work?
Frehywot,Seble; Mullan,Fitzhugh; Payne,Perry W; Ross,Heather;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862010000500014
Abstract: compulsory service programmes have been used worldwide as a way to deploy and retain a professional health workforce within countries. other names for these programmes include "obligatory", "mandatory", "required" and "requisite." all these different programme names refer to a country's law or policy that governs the mandatory deployment and retention of a heath worker in the underserved and/or rural areas of the country for a certain period of time. this study identified three different types of compulsory service programmes in 70 countries. these programmes are all governed by some type of regulation, ranging from a parliamentary law to a policy within the ministry of health. depending on the country, doctors, nurses, midwives and all types of professional allied health workers are required to participate in the programme. some of the compliance-enforcement measures include withholding full registration until obligations are completed, withholding degree and salary, or imposing large fines. this paper aims to explain these programmes more clearly, to identify countries that have or had such programmes, to develop a typology for the different kinds and to discuss the programmes in the light of important issues that are related to policy concepts and implementation. as governments consider the cost of investment in health professionals' education, the loss of health professionals to emigration and the lack of health workers in many geographic areas, they are using compulsory service requirements as a way to deploy and retain the health workforce.
It's the Students, Stupid!
Will Fitzhugh
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2013,
Abstract: no abstract
Bend it Like Truman
Will Fitzhugh
Nonpartisan Education Review , 2013,
Abstract: no abstract
International medical graduates in family medicine in the United States of America: an exploration of professional characteristics and attitudes
Amanda L Morris, Robert L Phillips, George E Fryer, Larry A Green, Fitzhugh Mullan
Human Resources for Health , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1478-4491-4-17
Abstract: This is a secondary data analysis of the 1996–1997 Community Tracking Study (CTS) Physician Survey comparing 2360 United States medical graduates and 366 international medical graduates who were nonfederal allopathic or osteopathic family physicians providing direct patient care for at least 20 hours per week.Compared to USMGs, IMGs were older (p < 0.001) and practised in smaller (p = 0.0072) and younger practices (p < 0.001). Significantly more IMGs practised in metropolitan areas versus rural areas (p = 0.0454). More IMG practices were open to all new Medicaid (p = 0.018) and Medicare (p = 0.0451) patients, and a greater percentage of their revenue was derived from these patients (p = 0.0020 and p = 0.0310). Fewer IMGs were board-certified (p < 0.001). More IMGs were dissatisfied with their overall careers (p = 0.0190). IMGs and USMGs did not differ in terms of self-rated ability to deliver high-quality care to their patients (p = 0.4626). For several of the clinical vignettes, IMGs were more likely to order tests, refer patients to specialists or require office visits than USMGs.There are significant differences between IMG and USMG family physicians' professional profiles and attitudes. These differences from 1997 merit further exploration and possible follow-up, given the increased proportion of family physicians who are IMGs in the United States.International Medical Graduates (IMGs) comprised 20.8% of the family physician workforce in 1995 [1]. In 2003, this number increased to 22.1% and is expected to continue to rise, given the large increase of IMGs entering family medicine residency programmes [1].Historically, family medicine has a smaller proportion of IMGs entering residency training than other primary-care specialties. This relationship is changing as IMGs increasingly filled family medicine residency positions not selected by United States Medical Graduates (USMGs), particularly those vacant after the annual Match [2].In the 2005 Match, 36.5% of PGY-
Evaluation of Contamination of Hands of the Medical Students in a Medical Teaching Tertiary Care Hospital  [PDF]
Keshvi Chauhan, Summaiya Mullan
Advances in Microbiology (AiM) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/aim.2017.79052
Abstract:
Background: In the hospital, patients are often exposed to multiple procedures, invasive devices etc., increasing their chances of contracting such potential pathogens. Most of the time these potential pathogens exhibit multiple drug resistance. Aim: In view of the above factors, this study was undertaken to determine the rate of colonization of potential bacterial pathogens in the hands of final year MBBS undergraduate students. As per their clinical teaching curriculum, they visit the wards/ICU/OT, etc. on a daily basis. Method: Samples were collected from the hands of final year MBBS undergraduate students. The samples were collected by rubbing a saline wet swab stick onto the hands of the students and were inoculated onto nutrient agar plates for 18 - 24 hours at 37°C aerobically. Bacterial isolates were identified till species level by performing gram staining and biochemical reactions. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by Kirby-baur disc diffusion method as per CLSI guidelines 2016. Conclusion: 103 samples were collected from hands of final year undergraduate MBBS students by swab culture method. 38 showed growth and 65 showed no growth. Out of 38 isolates, 36 were Gram positive cocci and 2 were Gram positive bacilli. No Gram negative bacilli were isolated. Amongst 36 Gram positive cocci, 16 were coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus and 20 were Coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS). 14 Staphylococcus aureus out of 16 were methicillin sensitive and 2 were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Out of 16 Staphylococcus aureus, 1 isolate showed Inducible Clindamycin Resistance (iMLSB phenotype) and 6 isolates showed complete resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin (constitutive MLSB phenotype). 1 Staphylococcus aureus which was Inducible Clindamycin Resistance (iMLSB phenotype) was also methicillin resistant.
A survey of Sub-Saharan African medical schools
Candice Chen, Eric Buch, Travis Wassermann, Seble Frehywot, Fitzhugh Mullan, Francis Omaswa, S Greysen, Joseph C Kolars, Delanyo Dovlo, Diaa El Gali Abu Bakr, Abraham Haileamlak, Abdel Koumare, Emiola Olapade-Olaopa
Human Resources for Health , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1478-4491-10-4
Abstract: The SAMSS survey is a descriptive survey study of Sub-Saharan African medical schools. The survey instrument included quantitative and qualitative questions focused on institutional characteristics, student profiles, curricula, post-graduate medical education, teaching staff, resources, barriers to capacity expansion, educational innovations, and external relationships with government and non-governmental organizations. Surveys were sent via e-mail to medical school deans or officials designated by the dean. Analysis is both descriptive and multivariable.Surveys were distributed to 146 medical schools in 40 of 48 Sub-Saharan African countries. One hundred and five responses were received (72% response rate). An additional 23 schools were identified after the close of the survey period. Fifty-eight respondents have been founded since 1990, including 22 private schools. Enrolments for medical schools range from 2 to 1800 and graduates range from 4 to 384. Seventy-three percent of respondents (n = 64) increased first year enrolments in the past five years. On average, 26% of respondents' graduates were reported to migrate out of the country within five years of graduation (n = 68). The most significant reported barriers to increasing the number of graduates, and improving quality, related to infrastructure and faculty limitations, respectively. Significant correlations were seen between schools implementing increased faculty salaries and bonuses, and lower percentage loss of faculty over the previous five years (P = 0.018); strengthened institutional research tools (P = 0.00015) and funded faculty research time (P = 0.045) and greater faculty involvement in research; and country compulsory service requirements (P = 0.039), a moderate number (1-5) of post-graduate medical education programs (P = 0.016) and francophone schools (P = 0.016) and greater rural general practice after graduation.The results of the SAMSS survey increases the level of data and understanding of m
A Construction That Produces Wallis-Type Formulas  [PDF]
Joshua M. Fitzhugh, David L. Farnsworth
Advances in Pure Mathematics (APM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/apm.2013.36074
Abstract:

Generalizations of the geometric construction that repeatedly attaches rectangles to a square, originally given by Myerson, are presented. The initial square is replaced with a rectangle, and also the dimensionality of the construction is increased. By selecting values for the various parameters, such as the lengths of the sides of the original rectangle or rectangular box in dimensions more than two and their relationships to the size of the attached rectangles or rectangular boxes, some interesting formulas are found. Examples are Wallis-type infinite-product formulas for the areas of p-circles with p > 1.

The Behavior of Normality when Iteratively Finding the Normal to a Line in an lp Geometry  [PDF]
Joshua M. Fitzhugh, David L. Farnsworth
Advances in Pure Mathematics (APM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/apm.2013.38086
Abstract:

The normal direction to the normal direction to a line in Minkowski geometries generally does not give the original line. We show that in lp geometries with p>1 repeatedly finding the normal line through the origin gives sequences of lines that monotonically approach specific lines of symmetry of the unit circle. Which lines of symmetry that are approached depends upon the value of p and the slope of the initial line.

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