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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 4669 matches for " FR;Berlese "
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Enterovirus infections and type 1 diabetes mellitus: is there any relationship?
Tavares, RG;Trevisol, RB;Comerlato, J;Dalzochio, T;Feksa, LR;Spilki, FR;Berlese, DB;
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S1678-91992012000100002
Abstract: several health organizations have classified diabetes mellitus, a metabolic syndrome, as the epidemic of the century, since it affects millions of people worldwide and is one of the top ten causes of death. type 1 diabetes is considered to be an autoimmune disease, in which autoaggressive t cells infiltrate the islets of langerhans in the pancreas, leading to the destruction of insulin producing beta cells. the risk of the disease is modulated by genetic factors, mainly genes coding for human leukocyte antigens (hla). however, the incidence of this disease has increased significantly during the recent decades, which cannot be explained only by genetic factors. environmental perturbations have also been associated to the development of diabetes. among these factors, viral triggers have been implicated; particularly enteroviruses, which have been associated to the induction of the disease. supporting the hypothesis, numerous lines of evidence coming from mouse models and patients with this type of diabetes have shown the association. the present review aims to provide some understanding of how type 1 diabetes occurs and the possible role of enterovirus in this pathology.
Anxiolytic-like effects of 4-phenyl-2-trichloromethyl-3H-1,5-benzodiazepine hydrogen sulfate in mice
Rubin M.A.,Albach C.A.,Berlese D.B.,Bonacorso H.G.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2000,
Abstract: The pharmacological effects of 4-phenyl-2-trichloromethyl-3H-1,5-benzodiazepine hydrogen sulfate (PTMB), a novel synthetic benzodiazepine, were examined in mice. In the elevated plus-maze test of anxiety, 0.3-1 mg/kg diazepam ip (F(3,53) = 3.78; P<0.05) and 1-10 mg/kg PTMB ip increased (F(5,98) = 3.26; P<0.01), whereas 2 mg/kg picrotoxin ip decreased (F(3,59) = 8.32; P<0.001) the proportion of time spent in the open arms, consistent with an anxiolytic action of both benzodiazepines, and an anxiogenic role for picrotoxin. In the holeboard, 1.0 mg/kg diazepam ip increased (F(3,54) = 2.78; P<0.05) and 2 mg/kg picrotoxin ip decreased (F(3,59) = 4.69; P<0.01) locomotor activity. Rotarod assessment revealed that 1 mg/kg diazepam ip and 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg PTMB ip produced significant motor incoordination compared to vehicle control (F(4,70) = 7.6; P<0.001). These data suggest that the recently synthesized PTMB compound possesses anxiolytic activity and produces motor incoordination similar to those observed with diazepam.
Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice
Tabarelli Z.,Berlese D.B.,Sauzem P.D.,Mello C.F.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003,
Abstract: Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL) is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage) on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight) and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight) or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight). CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage) in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage) in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.
Antinociceptive effect of novel pyrazolines in mice
Tabarelli Z.,Rubin M.A.,Berlese D.B.,Sauzem P.D.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2004,
Abstract: The antinociceptive effect of six novel synthetic pyrazolines (3-ethoxymethyl-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 1) and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 2) and phenyl (Pz 3) analogues, and 3-(1-ethoxyethyl)-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 4) and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 5) and phenyl (Pz 6) analogues) was evaluated by the tail immersion test in adult male albino mice. The animals (N = 11-12 in each group) received vehicle (5% Tween 80, 10 ml/kg, sc) or 1.5 mmol/kg of each of the pyrazolines (Pz 1-Pz 6), sc. Fifteen, thirty and sixty minutes after drug administration, the mice were subjected to the tail immersion test. Thirty minutes after drug administration Pz 2 and Pz 3 increased tail withdrawal latency (vehicle = 3.4 ± 0.2; Pz 2 = 5.2 ± 0.4; Pz 3 = 5.9 ± 0.4 s; mean ± SEM), whereas the other pyrazolines did not present antinociceptive activity. Dose-effect curves (0.15 to 1.5 mmol/kg) were constructed for the bioactive pyrazolines. Pz 2 (1.5 mmol/kg, sc) impaired motor coordination in the rotarod and increased immobility in the open-field test. Pz 3 did not alter rotarod performance and spontaneous locomotion, but increased immobility in the open field at the dose of 1.5 mmol/kg. The involvement of opioid mechanisms in the pyrazoline-induced antinociception was investigated by pretreating the animals with naloxone (2.75 μmol/kg, sc). Naloxone prevented Pz 3- but not Pz 2-induced antinociception. Moreover, naloxone pretreatment did not alter Pz 3-induced immobility. We conclude that Pz 3-induced antinociception involves opioid mechanisms but this is not the case for Pz 2.
Various Perspectives on Performance Appraisals in the Health Service  [PDF]
Fr?ydis Vasset
Health (Health) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/health.2014.610117
Abstract: Background: The health services are facing many new challenges, including a growing number of elderly patients, and an increasing use of technology in the work place. These challenges might require flexible and reflective conversations with the employees. Aim: This study examines whether some performance appraisals (PAs) are more efficient and more effective than others. The study also shows how some performance appraisals are more suitable for home care and nursing homes in municipal health services. Methods: Two datasets are used: 1) a questionnaire was distributed to a representative sample of 600 health personnel in Norway; and 2) a questionnaire was distributed to a representative sample of 60 employees (test-group: 10 groups; control-group: 30 employees), in pre-test, post-test 1 and post-test 2. SPSS. Findings: Managers are the only ones who receive training in PA techniques (factory perspective). Nurses versus auxiliary nurses experience more frequent dyadic relationships and exchanges in PAs (family perspective). PAs for employees from nursing homes are fairer than those administered to home care employees (jungle perspective). In organizations closest to carnival perspectives, employees participating in group-PAs are more active in the conversations than employees who have individual conversations in PAs. Conclusions: Health personnel involved in PAs experience different effects of the conversational, and employees working as a member of a team in the organization need to experience a high quality of relationships (family), justice (jungle), and participation in group-conversation (carnival) during performance appraisals.
Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice
Tabarelli, Z.;Berlese, D.B.;Sauzem, P.D.;Mello, C.F.;Rubin, M.A.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2003000100016
Abstract: surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. cremophor el (crel) is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. the antinociceptive effect of crel (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage) on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight) and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight) or saline (0.9% nacl, 10 ml/kg body weight). crel reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. at 10.6 g/kg, crel caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage) in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage) in the tail immersion test. the effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. these data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in crel.
Características miofuncionais de obesos respiradores orais e nasais
Berlese, Denise Bolzan;Fontana, Pamela Fantinel Ferreira;Botton, Luane;Weimnann, Angela Regina Maciel;Haeffner, Leris Salete Bonfanti;
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-80342012000200012
Abstract: purpose: to investigate the myofunctional characteristics of nasal and oral breathing in obese individuals. methods: participants were 24 obese individuals with ages between 8 and 15 years, who participated in the obesity group of the ambulatory of pediatrics of an university hospital, and were selected by convenience. the myofunctional characteristics were assessed using the orofacial myofunctional assessment with scales (avalia??o miofuncional orofacial com escalas - amiofe) protocol. results: oral breathing was present in 62.5%, and nasal breathing in 37.5% of the population studied. in the oral breathing group, 40% of the subjects presented lips tension during occlusion and 80% showed a narrow palate, while almost all nasal breathers had normal palate and lips posture (p<0.05). interposition of the tongue in the dental arches occurred in 47% of oral breathers and none of the nasal breathers. oral breathers showed the tendency not to repeat the swallowing of the same bolus. no difference was found between groups regarding face appearance, jaw posture, cheeks, and chewing function. conclusion: oral breathing in obese children and adolescents was accompanied by myofunctional alterations of the stomatognathic system, represented by narrow palate, interposition of the tongue in the dental arches, occlusion of the lips with tension, and swallowing disorders.
The ferric aerobactin receptor IutA, a protein isolated on agarose column, is not essential for uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection
Landgraf, Taise Natali;Berlese, Alan;Fernandes, Fabricio Freitas;Milanezi, Mariani Lima;Martinez, Roberto;Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson;
Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S0104-11692012000200017
Abstract: although many proteins have been described involved in escherichia coli colonization and infection, only few reports have shown lectins as important components in these processes. because the mechanisms underlying e. coli colonization process involving lectins are not fully understood, we sought to identify the presence of other non-described lectins in e. coli. here, we isolated a 75-kda protein from e. coli on sepharose column and identified it as ferric aerobactin receptor (iuta). since iuta is controversially associated with virulence of some e. coli strains, mainly in uropathogenic e. coli (upec), we evaluated the presence of iuta gene in upec isolated from patients with urinary infection. this gene was present in only 38% of the isolates, suggesting a weak association with virulence. because there is a redundancy in the siderophore-mediated uptake systems, we suggest that iuta can be advantageous but not essential for upec.
Corrective mating methods in context of breeding theory
FR Allaire
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1978, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-10-4-596a
Abstract:
Morphology of immature stages in the neotropical nonfrugivorous Tephritinae Fruit Fly Species Rachiptera limbata Bigot (Diptera: Tephritidae) on Baccharis linearis (R. et Pav.) (Asteraceae)
Frías, Daniel;
Neotropical Entomology , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1519-566X2008000500006
Abstract: rachiptera limbata bigot develops on baccharis linearis (r. et pav.) in the areas around santiago, chile. the larvae feed on stem tissues and secrete a liquid that hardens to form a protective feeding and pupation chamber. the immature stages of neotropical species of tephritinae are poorly known. in this paper, the morphology of the immature stages of r. limbata are described and compared, in a phylogenetic context, with other tephritinae species. antennomaxillary complex, pads, oral ridge, cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior and posterior spiracles and anal lobes of first-, second-, third-instar larvae and pupae were studied with optical and scanning electron microscopy. the cephalopharyngeal skeleton is darkly sclerotized and shows an opening or window in the ventral cornua. this trait seems to be plesiomorphic in r. limbata and in other neotropical species. first-instar larvae anterior spiracles are absent; whereas in second and third instars spiracles are developed as a row of five short tubules. in first- and second-instar larvae, the posterior spiracular slit has only a single hair per bundle; whereas third-instar larvae lack hairs. this last trait seems to be consequence of a larval development delay and an apomorphic trait in r. limbata, compared to other neotropical and neartical species.
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