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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1080 matches for " Ernest Owusu-Dapaah "
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Informed Consent under the Ghana Health Service Patients Charter: Practice and Awareness  [PDF]
Alexander Acheampong Oti, Ernest Owusu-Dapaah, Chris Adomako-Kwaakye, Daniel Kwesi Sabbah, Solomon Obiri-Yeboah, Ama Amuasi, Adu Tutu Amankwa, Ebenezer Adjei-Bediako, Eva Adu-Boakye
Journal of Biosciences and Medicines (JBM) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jbm.2016.44009
Abstract: Background: Every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his/her own body. Patient autonomy and the practice of informed patient consent are now pivotal in medical practice. Aim: To assess patient’s knowledge of Patients’ Rights Charter and whether patients receive adequate information to enable them make an informed consent to a particular treatment. Methodology: Patients who were undergoing elective surgery from selected surgical departments of Komfo Anokye teaching hospital in Kumasi were randomly selected and assisted to answer structured questionnaire without the knowledge of their doctors. The study period was in June to December (2014). Descriptive analysis was done using SPSS (II) of the results. Results: 84.7% (144) had no idea about the Patients’ Rights Charter of the Ghana Health Service. 75% (128) did not know or had not heard of informed patient consent. Of those who knew of the charter, 85% (37) had ever stayed in a developed country. 60% (102) did not know of their diagnosis. 79% (134) said the doctor only asked them to either sign or thumb print the consent document without giving them treatment options or possible complications. Conclusion: Most of respondents undergoing various surgical procedures at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital were not aware of the existence of the Patients’ Rights Charter of the Ghana Health Service. Again, practitioners did not provide sufficient information to patients for them to make an informed decision about their health.
Knowledge of Anaesthesia Providers on Exposure to Inhalational Anaesthetic Agents in Ghana  [PDF]
Ebenezer Owusu Darkwa, Robert Djagbletey, Ernest Ofosu-Appiah, Christian Owoo, Daniel A. Y. Sottie, Raymond Essuman, George Aryee
Journal of Biosciences and Medicines (JBM) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jbm.2017.54003
Abstract: Background: Chronic exposure to inhaled anaesthetic agents poses an occupational hazard related to the practice of anaesthesia. Therefore, this study sought to find out the perception of anaesthesia providers on exposure to inhalational anaesthetics, evaluate their knowledge on the effects of chronic exposure and strategies to reduce chronic exposure to operating room inhalational anaesthetic agents. Method: This cross-sectional survey was conducted by administering a self-administered questionnaire to 71 anaesthesia providers in Ghana who attended the annual refresher course of the faculty of Anaesthesia, West African College of Surgeons, in 2016. Data collected were analysed and presented as frequencies and percentages. Results: Halothane and isoflurane were the most frequently used inhalational agents by the respondents. Majority (90.1%) of the respondents perceived they are exposed to inhalational anaesthetics in their working environment. Majority of the anaesthetic providers cited poorly functioning scavenging systems (28.2%) and use of paediatric Ayre’s T-piece (28.2%) as sources of exposure to inhalational anaesthetics. All respondents admitted making attempts to reduce their exposure to inhalational anaesthetics. Majority of the respondents mentioned teratogenicity (77.5%) and hepatotoxicity (67.6%) as effects of chronic exposure to inhaled anaesthetic agents. Conclusion: Anaesthesia providers in Ghana perceived they are chronically exposed to inhalational anaesthetic agents in their work environment. They are aware of the sources of inhalational anaesthetic agent exposure, associated health risks and strategies required to reduce chronic exposure to inhaled anaesthetic agents.
Aetiological agents of cerebrospinal meningitis: a retrospective study from a teaching hospital in Ghana
Owusu Michael,Nguah Samuel,Boaitey Yaw,Badu-Boateng Ernest
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1476-0711-11-28
Abstract: s Background Meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in low-resource settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, the meningitis belt has been characterized by particularly high and seasonal incidences of bacterial meningitis extending throughout life. Despite the progress being made in treating the condition, the mortality rates continue to be high, ranging between 2% and 30% globally. In Ghana, the mortality rate of meningitis has been estimated to range from 36% to 50%. However little information is available on the pathogens contributing to meningitis and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Updated information is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment or prevention of meningitis which could have immense implications for local and global health. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory records of all patients suspected of bacterial meningitis who underwent a lumbar puncture from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data were retrieved from laboratory record books and double entered into a Microsoft excel spreadsheet. Results Records of 4,955 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 163 (3.3%, 95%CI: 2.8% to 3.8%) were confirmed meningitis and 106 (2.1%, 95%CI: 1.7% to 2.6%) were probable meningitis cases. Confirmed meningitis cases were made up of 117 (71.8%) culture positive bacteria, 19 (11.7%) culture positive Cryptococcus neoformans and 27(16.6%) Gram positive bacteria with negative culture. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae 91 (77.7%), followed by E.coli 4 (3.4%), Salmonella species 4 (3.4%), Neisseria meningitidis 3 (2.5%), Pseudomonas species 3(2.5%) and others. Pneumococcal isolates susceptibility to penicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone were 98.9% (95%CI: 94.0% to 100.0%), 83.0% (95%CI: 73.4% to 90.1%) and 100.0% (95%CI: 95.8% to 100.0%) respectively. Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of meningitis among all age groups and its susceptibility to penicillin and ceftriaxone still remains very high. Ghanaians of all ages and possibly other developing countries in the meningitis belt could benefit from the use of the pneumococcal vaccine. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens should also be considered in the management of patients presenting with meningitis.
Demographic patterns and trends in Central Ghana: baseline indicators from the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System
Seth Owusu-Agyei,Obed Ernest A. Nettey,Charles Zandoh,Abubakari Sulemana
Global Health Action , 2012, DOI: 10.3402/gha.v5i0.19033
Abstract: Background: The dearth of health and demographic data in sub-Saharan Africa from vital registration systems and its impact on effective planning for health and socio-economic development is widely documented. Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems have the capacity to address the dearth of quality data for policy making in resource-poor settings. Objective: This article demonstrates the utility of the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS) by showing the patterns and trends of population change from 2005 to 2009 in the Kintampo North Municipality and Kintampo South districts of Ghana through data obtained from the KHDSS biannual update rounds. Design: Basic demographic rates for fertility, mortality, and migration were computed by year. School enrolment was computed as a percentage in school by age and sex for 6–18 year-olds. Socio-economic status was derived by use of Principal Components Analysis on household assets. Results: Over the period, an earlier fertility decline was reversed in 2009; mortality declined slightly for all age-groups, and a significant share of working-age population was lost through out-migration. Large minorities of children of school-going age are not in school. Socio-economic factors are shown to be important determinants of fertility and mortality. Conclusion : Strengthening the capacity of HDSSs could offer added value to evidence-driven policymaking at local level.
Life Satisfaction among Elderly Households in Public Rental Housing in Singapore  [PDF]
Kwame Addae-Dapaah, Quah Shu Juan
Health (Health) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/health.2014.610132
Abstract: We set out to investigate how satisfied the poor elderly Singaporean households in social housing are with their lives, especially in relation to their housing, in an attempt to find measures to improve, where possible, the life satisfaction of this group of elderly Singaporeans. We use archival and empirical research for our investigation. The results from 403 respondents to our survey are analyzed through logistic regression and factor analysis. We find that the life satisfaction of the elderly residents of social housing is very low. Furthermore we find that home modification that meets the requirements of the respondents will substantially improve their life satisfaction. Given that these elderly households neither have the right nor financial means to modify their housing units and precincts, it is incumbent upon the government, through the relevant authorities such as HDB, Town Councils and BCA to effect the necessary home modifications to create a more elderly-friendly physical environment to improve the life satisfaction of the elderly households in social housing in Singapore. This arguably is a social imperative which should not be subjugated to economic niceties as social housing is not a luxurious housing choice but the last safety net for basic shelter.

Making Family Planning Services Relevant to Adolescents: Perspectives from Rural Communities in Central Ghana  [PDF]
Yeetey Enuameh, Charlotte Tawiah, Samuel Afari-Asiedu, Obed Ernest A. Nettey, Abubakari Sulemana, Emmanuel Mahama, George Adjei, Ellen Boamah, Alex Manu, Stephanie Gyaase, Charles Zandoh, Nelson Amanfo, Kwaku Poku Asante, Timothy Letsa, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2014.411096
Abstract: In lower middle-income countries like Ghana, it is common to find low contraceptive use among adolescents with corresponding high pregnancy outcomes. Evidence points to the fact that the use of contraceptives prevents maternal, neonatal and infant deaths, but in most lower middle-income countries, socio-cultural practices inhibit adolescents’ use. Ensuring the uptake of family planning among adolescents is deemed a necessary means of reducing maternal, neonatal and infant mor-tality. This manuscript seeks to provide contextually relevant approaches to satisfying family planning needs of adolescents in a population lacking it. We employed a qualitative study design from an interpretive paradigm with phenomenology as the methodology to understand societal attitudes towards family planning delivery to adolescents, so as to arrive at contextually appro-priate ways of providing family planning to this needy group. Focused group discussions and in-depth interviews techniques were used in data collection among adolescents, relevant commu-nity opinion leaders and family planning & health services providers. Themes that emerged from data analysis with respect to “perspectives on family planning care delivery to adolescents” and “best ways in addressing adolescents’ family planning needs” are presented, followed by discussion of the issues emerging. A significant and encouraging finding of the study was that opinion leaders and healthcare providers viewed family planning as a means of protecting adolescents against pregnancies and their complications. A key recommendation is for policy makers and political leaders to enact legislations that enable adolescents to have friendly family planning service delivery in all places and at all times.
Family Planning Needs of Adolescents in Predominantly Rural Communities in the Central Part of Ghana  [PDF]
Yeetey Enuameh, Obed Ernest Nettey, Emmanuel Mahama, Charlotte Tawiah, Ellen Boamah, Abubakari Sulemana, George Adjei, Stephanie Gyaase, Samuel Afari Asiedu, Alexander Manu, Charles Zandoh, Kwaku Poku Asante, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2015.56030
Abstract: The manuscript presents findings of a descriptive analysis of data from a cross-sectional study of adolescents aimed at identifying their family planning needs and the best approaches to addressing them in the Kintampo Districts of Ghana. Data for the paper were from the family planning module of a sexual and reproductive health survey carried out by the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System in 2011. Adolescents in this study recorded high marital (1.6% females and 0.4% males) and pregnancy rates (11.5% females and 1.5% males). Their knowledge of contraceptive methods was high (87.7% females and 82% males), but utilization was low (17.9% females and 6% males). Most study participants viewed family planning as important to their health and wellbeing (59.6% females and 58.6% males). A minority of adolescents were of the perception that contraceptive use was solely the responsibility of women (41.1% females and 32.4% males); and that the use of contraceptives could lead to promiscuity among women (43.8% females and 42.5% males). Those adolescents who previously had unwanted pregnancies would have accepted some help in preventing it (33.1% females and 9.1% males). Recommendations made by respondents included creating a friendly atmosphere by care providers for family planning services delivery to adolescents. Other suggestions were ensuring that family planning services are available and accessible to adolescents, and educating adolescents on the diverse methods available.
Adolescents’ Willingness and Intentions to Use Contraceptives in Rural Ghana  [PDF]
Sulemana Abubakari, Yeetey A. Enuameh, Emmanuel Mahama, Obed Ernest A. Nettey, George Adjei, Gifty Fosuaa Nuamah, Edward Apraku Anane, Robert Adda, Francis Dzabeng, Seeba Amenga-Etego, Charles Zandoh, Kwaku Poku Asante, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.311029
Abstract: Efforts made to improve the availability and access to family planning services to adolescents in Ghana have not yielded the desired results. Adolescents in the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System area are no exception. This study explored contraceptive use intentions, preferences and their determinants among adolescents in rural Ghana. This was to contribute evidence towards achieving universal access to reproductive health. A cross-sectional study design was used to collect Sexual and Reproductive Health data in the Kintampo districts in 2011. A total of 1805 female adolescents were randomly sampled from a resident female adolescent population of 16,795. This study used intention and/or willingness of adolescents to use contraceptives as the outcome variable and the explanatory variables were demographic and socioeconomic factors. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were done. The findings indicated 54.3% of adolescents’ were willing to use contraceptives. Injectable was the most preferred contraceptive method among adolescents (48.6%); this was followed by the pill (29.6%) with the least being foam or jelly (0.2%). The most commonly cited reason for not intending to use contraception was adolescents’ opposition to family planning (31.5%) followed by a fear of side effects (25.8%). Age and education influenced adolescents’ willingness to use contraceptives in the future. Formal education of the young generation coupled with knowledge of contraceptive methods could yield positive outcomes for contraceptive use and ultimately reproductive health of the adolescent population in the near future.
Floral diversity and carbon stocks and of protected forest ecosystem: A case of UENR’s Bat Sanctuary, Sunyani, Ghana  [PDF]
Nat Owusu-Prempeh, Osei Owusu Antobre, Thomas Agyei
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2018.81003
Abstract: The study assesses the functional status of the University of Energy and Natural Resources’ (UENR) bat sanctuary by examining its floral diversity and carbon stocks. Twenty-nine sampling points (plots) were randomly generated by using the ArcGIS random sampling algorithm. Using a three-nest sampling plot of 100m2, 25m2, and 1m2 quadrat, the enumeration of trees (DBH>10cm), saplings (>2cm DBH <10cm) and seedlings (girth <2cm) was undertaken, respectively. Additionally, the diversity of each floral species was computed using the Shannon Wiener diversity index whilst the carbon stocks were estimated using allometric equations. The total carbon stock per plot was derived from the summation of the aboveground carbon (AGC), belowground carbon (BGC) and deadwood carbon (DWC). In sum, 450 floral individuals belonging to 47 species and 22 families were enumerated with Bignoniaceae (16.4%), Apocynaceae (10.0%), Caesalpiniaceae (9.2%) and Rubiaceae (8.8%) being the most common families within the protected area (PA). The average carbon sequestered per hectare of the PA was 2,789.3 tons. However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the 10m buffer created and the core area with respect to species diversity and carbon stocks. The study has provided valuable information on the functional status of the bat sanctuary which will help promote its conservation for sustained provision of ecosystem services.
Household Perceptions, Treatment-Seeking Behaviors and Health Outcomes for Buruli Ulcer Disease in a Peri-Urban District in Ghana  [PDF]
Adobea Yaa Owusu, Clement Adamba
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2012.23024
Abstract: Buruli ulcer (BU) has been associated with very unimaginable outcomes. It is flesh eating, disfiguring and economically dehydrating. Yet the disease is still mostly shrouded in mystery. Consequently, people have different perceptions about it and hence adopt different treatment behaviorss towards it; notwithstanding the free treatment for it. The purpose of this paper is to identify and examine respondents’ perceptions and the influence these have on their health seeking behaviorss. Eighty-six BU patients who had been treated or were being treated of BU in the Ga West District Health Center in Ghana were sampled for this study. A structured questionnaire and a qualitative in-depth interview guide were used to elicit the data. Some of the interviewees held the belief that the disease is caused by their adversaries, including witches. More than half of the respondents, however, did not have any idea about the disease and thought it is just the work of God. The first point of call for health care for most of the patients studied was herbalists or else they used herbs. Nearly a quarter of them also engaged in self medication, including the use of ‘pain killers’ and ointments, since they took the first signs for ordinary boils. Perceptions of the cause of the disease influenced health seeking behaviors, which further influenced treatment outcomes. A lot of education is needed on the symptoms of the disease, including encouraging early seeking of care at the District Health Center.
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