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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 215879 matches for " Eric P Cohen "
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Exforge (amlodipine/valsartan combination) in hypertension: the evidence of its therapeutic impact
Jean-Marie Krzesinski, Eric P Cohen
Core Evidence , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CE.S6007
Abstract: rge (amlodipine/valsartan combination) in hypertension: the evidence of its therapeutic impact Review (7104) Total Article Views Authors: Jean-Marie Krzesinski, Eric P Cohen Published Date June 2009 Volume 2009:4 Pages 1 - 11 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CE.S6007 Jean-Marie Krzesinski1, Eric P Cohen2 1Division of Nephrology/Transplantation, University of Liège – Sart Tilman, Belgium; 2Nephrology Division, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA Introduction: Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its management requires improvement. New treatment strategies are needed. Aims: This review analyses one of these strategies, which is the development of effective and safe combination therapy. Indeed, at least two antihypertensive agents are often needed to achieve blood pressure control. Exforge (Novartis) is a new drug combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, and the angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan. Evidence review: The amlodipine/valsartan combination is an association of two well-known antihypertensive products with specific targets in cardiovascular protection, namely calcium channel blockade and antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This kind of association, with neutral metabolic properties and significant antihypertensive efficacy, could be a useful new antihypertensive product. Currently available data have shown that this new combination is well-tolerated and effective even in severe hypertension. Clinical value: Clinical trials are ongoing for further assessment of the efficacy, compliance, and safety of this combination and its congeners. No data exist to prove that the amlodipine/valsartan combination is better than other antihypertensive strategies for cardiovascular or renal protection, but some trials with other combination therapies show such potential advantage.
Exforge® (amlodipine/valsartan combination) in hypertension: the evidence of its therapeutic impact
Jean-Marie Krzesinski,Eric P Cohen
Core Evidence , 2009,
Abstract: Jean-Marie Krzesinski1, Eric P Cohen21Division of Nephrology/Transplantation, University of Liège – Sart Tilman, Belgium; 2Nephrology Division, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAIntroduction: Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its management requires improvement. New treatment strategies are needed. Aims: This review analyses one of these strategies, which is the development of effective and safe combination therapy. Indeed, at least two antihypertensive agents are often needed to achieve blood pressure control. Exforge (Novartis) is a new drug combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, and the angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan. Evidence review: The amlodipine/valsartan combination is an association of two well-known antihypertensive products with specific targets in cardiovascular protection, namely calcium channel blockade and antagonism of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This kind of association, with neutral metabolic properties and significant antihypertensive efficacy, could be a useful new antihypertensive product. Currently available data have shown that this new combination is well-tolerated and effective even in severe hypertension.Clinical value: Clinical trials are ongoing for further assessment of the efficacy, compliance, and safety of this combination and its congeners. No data exist to prove that the amlodipine/valsartan combination is better than other antihypertensive strategies for cardiovascular or renal protection, but some trials with other combination therapies show such potential advantage. Keywords: arterial hypertension, treatment, combination therapy, calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan
Percussion hemoglobinuria - a novel term for hand trauma-induced mechanical hemolysis: a case report
Monica Vasudev, Barbara A Bresnahan, Eric P Cohen, Parameswaran N Hari, Sundaram Hariharan, Brahm S Vasudev
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-5-508
Abstract: A 24-year-old Caucasian man presented with reddish brown discoloration of his urine after playing the djembe drum. Urine examination after a rigorous practice session revealed blood on the dipstick, and 0 to 2 red blood cells per high power field microscopically. The urine sample was negative for myoglobulin. Other causes of hemolysis and hematuria were excluded and cessation of drum playing resulted in resolution of his symptoms.The association of mechanical trauma-induced hemoglobinuria and playing hand percussion instruments is increasingly being recognized. We, however, feel that the true prevalence is higher than what has been previously recorded in the literature. By coining the term "percussion hemoglobinuria" we hope to raise the awareness of screening for upper extremity trauma-induced mechanical hemolysis in the evaluation of a patient with hemoglobinuria.Extracorpuscular hemolysis due to mechanical trauma was originally described using the term "march hemoglobinuria" by Fleischer in 1881, in a young soldier following a strenuous field march [1]. Since then, hemoglobinuria has been described in both genders and after a wide range of activities. It has been associated with walking, running and marching [2], and also with Japanese fencing and karate [3]. A few authors have also described hemoglobinuria following African drum playing [4,5]. Tobel et al. characterized 45 healthy individuals who participated in a cultural hand drumming event in Uruguay, and confirmed extracorpuscular hemolysis as a cause of rust urine [6]. Factors which influence hemoglobinuria was described by Davidson in 1969, who demonstrated that the individual running style, type of foot wear and the running surface were independent variables, and modification of these could prevent hemoglobinuria [7]. A reduction in hemolytic episodes by use of rubber insoles in shoes or protective covering over hands has also been noted [8].Typically, patients with extracorpuscular hemolysis due to mecha
High prevalence of undiagnosed chronic kidney disease among at-risk population in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo
Ernest K Sumaili, Eric P Cohen, Chantal V Zinga, Jean-Marie Krzesinski, Nestor M Pakasa, Nazaire M Nseka
BMC Nephrology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2369-10-18
Abstract: In a cross-sectional study, 527 people from primary and secondary health care areas in the city of Kinshasa were studied from a random sample of at-risk out-patients with hypertension, diabetes, obesity, or HIV+. We measured blood pressure (BP), blood glucose level, proteinuria, body mass index, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR by MDRD equation) using calibrated creatinine levels based on one random measurement. The associations between health characteristics, indicators of kidney damage (proteinuria) and kidney function (<60 ml/min/1.73 m2) were also examined.The prevalence of CKD in this study was 36%, but only 12% were aware of their condition. 4% of patients had stage 1 CKD, 6% stage 2, 18% stage 3, 2% stage 4, and 6% had stage 5. 24 hour quantitative proteinuria (>300 mg/day) was found in 19%. In those with the at-risk conditions, the % of CKD was: 44% in patients with hypertension, 39% in those with diabetes; 16% in the obese and 12% in those who were HIV+. 82% of those with a history of diabetes had elevated serum glucose levels at screening (≥ 126 mg/dl). Only 6% of individuals with hypertension having CKD had reduced BP to lower than 130/80 mmHg. In multivariate analysis, diabetes, proteinuria and hypertension were the strongest determinants of CKD 3+.It appears that one out of three people in this at-risk population has undiagnosed CKD and poorly controlled CKD risk factors. This growing problem poses clear challenges to this developing country. Therefore, CKD should be addressed through the development of multidisciplinary teams and improved communication between traditional health care givers and nephrology services. Attention to CKD risk factors must become a priority.Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a worldwide health problem [1]. Indeed, the incidence and prevalence of CKD has increased in recent years in both developed and developing countries [2] including in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) [3]. In SSA, CKD affects mainly young adults in their
"Recurrent colorectal metastatic lesion, identified by F-18 FDG coincidence PET scan "
Cohen P
Iranian Journal of Nuclear Medicine , 2000,
Abstract: NO ABSTRACT
24 Years old male with abnormal Sestamibi scan
Cohen P
Iranian Journal of Nuclear Medicine , 2002,
Abstract: [no abstract]
Unification of perturbation theory, RMT and semiclassical considerations in the study of parametrically-dependent eigenstates
Doron Cohen,Eric J. Heller
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.2841
Abstract: We consider a classically chaotic system that is described by an Hamiltonian $H(Q,P;x)$ where x is a constant parameter. Our main interest is in the case of a gas-particle inside a cavity, where $x$ controls a deformation of the boundary or the position of a `piston'. The quantum-eigenstates of the system are $|n(x)>$. We describe how the parametric kernel $P(n|m)=||^2$ evolves as a function of $\delta x = (x-x_0)$. We explore both the perturbative and the non-perturbative regimes, and discuss the capabilities and the limitations of semiclassical as well as of random-waves and random-matrix-theory (RMT) considerations.
Sexual dimorphism in immune response genes as a function of puberty
Rebecca Lamason, Po Zhao, Rashmi Rawat, Adrian Davis, John C Hall, Jae Chae, Rajeev Agarwal, Phillip Cohen, Antony Rosen, Eric P Hoffman, Kanneboyina Nagaraju
BMC Immunology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2172-7-2
Abstract: After the onset of puberty, female mice showed a higher expression of adaptive immune response genes, while males had a higher expression of innate immune genes. This result suggested a requirement for sex hormones. Using in vivo and in vitro assays in normal and mutant mouse strains, we found that reverse signaling through FasL was directly influenced by estrogen, with downstream consequences of increased CD8+ T cell-derived B cell help (via cytokines) and enhanced immunoglobulin production.These results demonstrate that sexual dimorphism in innate and adaptive immune genes is dependent on puberty. This study also revealed that estrogen influences immunoglobulin levels in post-pubertal female mice via the Fas-FasL pathway.The incidence and severity of human diseases vary between the sexes: For example, autoimmune diseases are generally more common in females than in males and are most marked in women of childbearing age [1-3]. Thus, it appears that susceptibility to autoimmunity is expressed at the time of puberty. Puberty is a period of intense molecular, physiological and anatomical reorganization in the body, and the hormonal changes occurring at the time of puberty lay the framework for biological differences that persist throughout life and may contribute to the variable onset and progression of disease in males and females [4]. Sex-related differences in disease susceptibility have also been observed in several mouse models of infectious and autoimmune diseases and may be related to differences in the expression patterns of immune response genes [5,6].Immune responses are sexually dimorphic, both in type and magnitude. Two general systems of immunity to infectious agents have been selected during evolution: innate (natural) immunity, and acquired (adaptive or specific) immunity. The innate immune system uses proteins encoded in the germline (on macrophages, mast cells, natural killer cells) to recognize conserved products of infectious non-self (i.e., microbi
Chronic kidney disease among high school students of Kinshasa
Justine B Bukabau, Jean Robert R Makulo, Nestor M Pakasa, Eric P Cohen, Fran?ois B Lepira, Nazaire M Nseka, Patrick K Kayembe, Ernest K Sumaili
BMC Nephrology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2369-13-24
Abstract: In an epidemiological cross sectional study, a random sample of 524 pupils (263 boys, mean age of 18.7 ± 1.4 years) from school environment of Kinshasa were studied. Recorded parameters of interest were anthropometric, proteinuria, serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) according to the Schwartz formula using uncalibrated creatinine levels from one random measurement. CKD was defined as the presence of kidney damage (daily proteinuria ≥ 300 mg) and/or reduced kidney function (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Concordances between eGFR according to Schwartz, Cockcroft-Gault (C-G) indexed for BSA and modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) study equations were computed using the kappa coefficient.The prevalence of CKD by the Schwartz formula was 1.5%. By stage, 0.8% had CKD stage 1 (proteinuria with normal eGFR) and 0.8% had CKD stage 3 (eGFR, 30 to 59 ml/min/1.73 m2). The prevalence of proteinuria ≥ 300 mg/day was 1% (one case had 2.7g/day). Agreement between eGFR according to Schwartz formula and the MDRD formula was excellent (kappa: 88.8%). Although correlations between all formulas were excellent (0.99; 0.87, and 0.89), agreement was poor between eGFR according to Schwartz and C-G indexed BSA equation (kappa: 52.7%) and, poorer with C-G unadjusted for BSA (kappa: 26.9%).In the large African city of Kinshasa, 2% of high school students have CKD. This high prevalence rate emphasizes the need for appropriate detection and prevention measures in this vulnerable young age population group.
Jean-Luc Darlix: Renaissance scientist and retrovirologist par excellence
Mark A Wainberg, Eric A Cohen
Retrovirology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1742-4690-8-59
Abstract: On June 1-2, 2011, a special symposium was organized at the Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS) in Lyon, France to mark the imminent retirement from that institution of its Head of Human Virology, Professor Jean-Luc Darlix. The symposium featured scientific presentations by both French and international scientists who came from countries throughout the world to pay tribute to their friend and colleague and to celebrate with him his legendary and fulfilling career in virology and biochemistry that has spanned more than four decades. During this time, Jean-Luc Darlix has been responsible for the training of more than 50 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows, many of whom are now outstanding scientists in their own right and who hold independent research positions both in France and elsewhere. The occasion was marked by a special recognition given to Jean-Luc by the Editors of Retrovirology. Notably, Professor Darlix was a founding member of the editorial board of Retrovirology and has served tirelessly on the board for the past eight years. He has also authored eleven Retrovirology papers including recent contributions [1,2]. To honor his multiple and original achievements over many years toward the advancement of retrovirus research, Jean-Luc received the first ever Retrovirology Lifetime Achievement Award (Figure 1).Jean-Luc obtained his PhD under the supervision of P Fromageot and F Gros while studying "In Vitro Transcription of DNA by Using Purine Nucleotide Analogs". Subsequently, he performed post-doctoral research in both the USA and in Switzerland, prior to taking up his first faculty position in 1977 at the University of Geneva where he studied both Rous Sarcoma virus(RSV) and Moloney Leukemia virus (MLV) as models of viral replication. It was during this period that Jean-Luc published some of the first findings anywhere on retroviral diversity and this work infused him with the passion that would define his career as someone who wanted to understand the det
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