oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 34 )

2018 ( 227 )

2017 ( 231 )

2016 ( 331 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 191186 matches for " Emmett D "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /191186
Display every page Item
Use of certainty-based marking in a second-year medical student cohort: a pilot study
Schoendorfer N, Emmett D
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S35972
Abstract: e of certainty-based marking in a second-year medical student cohort: a pilot study Original Research (984) Total Article Views Authors: Schoendorfer N, Emmett D Published Date December 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 139 - 143 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S35972 Received: 15 July 2012 Accepted: 28 August 2012 Published: 20 December 2012 Niikee Schoendorfer, David Emmett Centre for Medical Education, Research and Scholarship, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Australia Background: Assessments which consider both competence and confidence attempt to provide insight into actual performance in order to optimize physician capabilities, providing motivation and direction for future learning. The aim of this project was to assess medical students’ thoughts and opinions of the utility of a certainty-based marking (CBM) protocol with respect to improving their learning experiences. Methods: Second-year medical students at the University of Queensland were provided with a series of optional online formative assessment tools, in the form of 10 sample questions, to support their current module learning outcomes. During four consecutive weeks, CBM was offered on weeks 1, 2, and 4, with week 3 being provided in the usual question-answer format. A mixed-method survey was distributed at the conclusion of the trial period to obtain feedback on the students’ impressions of learning via this technique. Results: Of the 400 students, 15%, 11%, 9%, and 8% used the resource over the four-week period, respectively. During the four-week module directly prior to the test module, 46%, 44%, 44%, and 40% of the students accessed the sample questions which were delivered in the usual multiple choice format. A majority of the students either agreed or strongly agreed that CBM was easy to understand (52%) and useful (57%), but took more time (67%) because they needed to consider their certainty level for every question (76%). A number of students (43%) also stated that CBM affected their attitudes toward decision-making, while 86% thought it would be most useful for revision as opposed to an examination format. Discussion: Despite the inherent benefits of gaining experience in higher order thinking processes, students were less likely to participate in the CBM tasks than standard multiple choice, even though these did not count toward their final grades. Conclusion: Utilizing such practices at the beginning of an educational program may minimize apparent resistance and alter learning practices to become conducive to deeper levels of learning. This has been corroborated in other studies aiming to encourage similar higher order cognitive processes.
Use of certainty-based marking in a second-year medical student cohort: a pilot study
Schoendorfer N,Emmett D
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Niikee Schoendorfer, David EmmettCentre for Medical Education, Research and Scholarship, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, AustraliaBackground: Assessments which consider both competence and confidence attempt to provide insight into actual performance in order to optimize physician capabilities, providing motivation and direction for future learning. The aim of this project was to assess medical students’ thoughts and opinions of the utility of a certainty-based marking (CBM) protocol with respect to improving their learning experiences.Methods: Second-year medical students at the University of Queensland were provided with a series of optional online formative assessment tools, in the form of 10 sample questions, to support their current module learning outcomes. During four consecutive weeks, CBM was offered on weeks 1, 2, and 4, with week 3 being provided in the usual question-answer format. A mixed-method survey was distributed at the conclusion of the trial period to obtain feedback on the students’ impressions of learning via this technique.Results: Of the 400 students, 15%, 11%, 9%, and 8% used the resource over the four-week period, respectively. During the four-week module directly prior to the test module, 46%, 44%, 44%, and 40% of the students accessed the sample questions which were delivered in the usual multiple choice format. A majority of the students either agreed or strongly agreed that CBM was easy to understand (52%) and useful (57%), but took more time (67%) because they needed to consider their certainty level for every question (76%). A number of students (43%) also stated that CBM affected their attitudes toward decision-making, while 86% thought it would be most useful for revision as opposed to an examination format.Discussion: Despite the inherent benefits of gaining experience in higher order thinking processes, students were less likely to participate in the CBM tasks than standard multiple choice, even though these did not count toward their final grades.Conclusion: Utilizing such practices at the beginning of an educational program may minimize apparent resistance and alter learning practices to become conducive to deeper levels of learning. This has been corroborated in other studies aiming to encourage similar higher order cognitive processes.Keywords: assessment, medical education, certainty-based marking
The Roles of Angiogenesis in Malignant Melanoma: Trends in Basic Science Research over the Last 100 Years
D. Dewing,M. Emmett,R. Pritchard Jones
ISRN Oncology , 2012, DOI: 10.5402/2012/546927
Abstract: Blood vessels arose during evolution carrying oxygen and nutrients to distant organs via complex networks of blood vessels penetrating organs and tissues. Mammalian cells require oxygen and nutrients for survival, of which oxygen has a diffusion limit of 100 to 200?μm between cell and blood vessel. For growth beyond this margin, cells must recruit new blood vessels, first by vasculogenesis, where embryonic vessels form from endothelial precursors, then angiogenesis which is the sprouting of interstitial tissue columns into the lumen of preexisting blood vessels. Angiogenesis occurs in many inflammatory diseases and in many malignant disease states, including over 90% of solid tumours. Malignant melanoma (MM) is the most lethal skin cancer, highly angiogenic, highly metastatic, and refractory to all treatments. Raised serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) strongly correlate MM disease progression and poor prognosis. Melanoma cells secrete several proangiogenic cytokines including VEGF-A, fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), platelet growth factor (PGF-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and transforming growth factor (TGF-1) that modulate the angiogenic switch, changing expression levels during tumour transition from radial to invasive vertical and then metastatic growth. We highlight modern and historical lines of research and development that are driving this exciting area of research currently. 1. Angiogenesis Angiogenesis was first associated with malignancy 100 years ago [1] being new vessel growth from a pre-existing blood supply. It is physiologically tightly regulated during wound healing, embryogenesis, and female reproduction. It also occurs in several pathological conditions including malignant melanoma. In 1919, Krogh described a tissue cylinder surrounding an axial blood vessel allowing oxygen and glucose diffusion for metabolism [2]. In 1945, vascularised tumour cell transplants used in vivo murine models survived to promote tumour survival and growth [3]. A diffusible “angiogenic” substance was later proposed in 1968 using a hamster cheek pouch model demonstrating choriocarcinoma vasoproliferation [4]. In 1971, Folkman postulated that tumour growth and metastasis driven by angiogenesis might be blocked by inhibiting angiogenesis (6). Later it was recognised, ischaemic stress occurs as the tumour growth exceeds the distances of Krogh’s cylinder, resulting in ischaemic necrosis, or ischaemic/hypoxic induced activation of angiogenesis [5] with diffusion limits of oxygen for cell survival measured at 100–200 microns [6]. Beyond this
FADS2 Polymorphisms Modify the Effect of Breastfeeding on Child IQ
Colin D. Steer,George Davey Smith,Pauline M. Emmett,Joseph R. Hibbeln,Jean Golding
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011570
Abstract: Breastfeeding is important for child cognitive development. A study by Caspi et al has suggested that rs174575 within the FADS2 gene moderates this effect so that children homozygous in the minor allele (GG genotype) have similar IQs irrespective of feeding method.
Albert Ellis (1913-2007)
Leonor Lega,Emmett Velten
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología , 2008,
Abstract:
America’s Displaced Worker: Resources for Successful Workforce Re-entry
Emmett Griswold,Iris Ellis
Journal of Studies in Education , 2012, DOI: 10.5296/jse.v2i2.1428
Abstract: The United States has suffered record unemployment and underemployment for the past decade. According to surveys conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Statistics, the most consistent responses for worker displacement have been insufficient work and plant or company closure and relocation. To recover, the U.S government has encouraged unemployed and displaced workers to enroll in community and technical colleges to develop the skills needed to compete in our global economy. The future of the nation’s global competiveness and international relevance depends heavily on the quantity and quality of skilled workers produced. This purpose of this article is to showcase some of the statistical data available concerning unemployed Americans, the factors contributing to the displacement of workers, the financial cost of the displaced worker, and the federal programs designed to assist displaced workers with acquiring postsecondary credentials and skills for successful workforce re-entry. Emphasized in this article is the importance of goal setting and potential career options for the displaced worker and adult learner.
High order schemes based on operator splitting and deferred corrections for stiff time dependent PDEs
Max Duarte,Matthew Emmett
Mathematics , 2014,
Abstract: We consider quadrature formulas of high order in time based on Radau-type, L-stable implicit Runge-Kutta schemes to solve time dependent stiff PDEs. Instead of solving a large nonlinear system of equations, we develop a method that performs iterative deferred corrections to compute the solution at the collocation nodes of the quadrature formulas. The numerical stability is guaranteed by a dedicated operator splitting technique that efficiently handles the stiffness of the PDEs and provides initial and intermediate solutions to the iterative scheme. In this way the low order approximations computed by a tailored splitting solver of low algorithmic complexity are iteratively corrected to obtain a high order solution based on a quadrature formula. The mathematical analysis of the numerical errors and local order of the method is carried out in a finite dimensional framework for a general semi-discrete problem, and a time-stepping strategy is conceived to control numerical errors related to the time integration. Numerical evidence confirms the theoretical findings and assesses the performance of the method in the case of a stiff reaction-diffusion equation.
Quantifying Reticulation in Phylogenetic Complexes Using Homology
Kevin Emmett,Raul Rabadan
Quantitative Biology , 2015,
Abstract: Reticulate evolutionary processes result in phylogenetic histories that cannot be modeled using a tree topology. Here, we apply methods from topological data analysis to molecular sequence data with reticulations. Using a simple example, we demonstrate the correspondence between nontrivial higher homology and reticulate evolution. We discuss the sensitivity of the standard filtration and show cases where reticulate evolution can fail to be detected. We introduce an extension of the standard framework and define the median complex as a construction to recover signal of the frequency and scale of reticulate evolution by inferring and imputing putative ancestral states. Finally, we apply our methods to two datasets from phylogenetics. Our work expands on earlier ideas of using topology to extract important evolutionary features from genomic data.
TOX defines a conserved subfamily of HMG-box proteins
Emmett O'Flaherty, Jonathan Kaye
BMC Genomics , 2003, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-4-13
Abstract: We show here that based on sequence alignment, TOX best fits into the sequence-independent HMG-box family. Three other human and murine predicted proteins are identified that share a common HMG-box domain with TOX, as well as other features. The gene encoding one of these additional family members has a distinct but overlapping pattern of tissue expression when compared to TOX. In addition, we identify genes encoding predicted TOX HMG-box subfamily members in pufferfish and mosquito.We have identified a novel subfamily of HMG-box proteins that is related to the recently described TOX protein. The highly conserved nature of the TOX family of proteins in humans and mice and differences in the pattern of expression between family members suggest non-overlapping functions of individual proteins. In addition, our data suggest that the TOX subtype of HMG-box domain first appeared in invertebrates, was duplicated in early vertebrates and likely took on new functions in mammalian species.Regulation of DNA-dependent processes such as transcription, replication, and strand repair requires bending and unwinding of compacted chromatin structure. Many of these structural changes are mediated by high mobility group (HMG) proteins, a diverse superfamily of non-histone chromosomal proteins that were originally classified by their electrophoretic mobility [1]. HMG proteins contain DNA-binding domains that allow them to produce specific changes in target DNA structure [2,3]. Three structurally distinct classes of HMG proteins have been defined; the HMG-nucleosomal binding family, the HMG-AT-hook family, and the HMG-box family (whose canonical members are referred to as HMGN, HMGA and HMGB respectively) [4]. In addition, a large number of proteins have been found that contain HMG protein related motifs.All members of the HMG-box family possess a 70–80 amino acid DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) related to a motif originally identified in HMGB1 [5]. The HMG-box may also be involved in
Computing by Means of Physics-Based Optical Neural Networks
A. Steven Younger,Emmett Redd
Electronic Proceedings in Theoretical Computer Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4204/eptcs.26.15
Abstract: We report recent research on computing with biology-based neural network models by means of physics-based opto-electronic hardware. New technology provides opportunities for very-high-speed computation and uncovers problems obstructing the wide-spread use of this new capability. The Computation Modeling community may be able to offer solutions to these cross-boundary research problems.
Page 1 /191186
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.