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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 387214 matches for " Elodie J. O’Connor "
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A longitudinal study of quality of life among people living with a progressive neurological illness  [PDF]
Marita P. McCabe, Elodie J. OConnor
Health (Health) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/health.2013.56A2004
Abstract:

This study investigated predictors of quality of life (QOL) of people with progressive neurological illnesses. Participants were 257 people with motor neurone disease (MND), Huntington’s disease (HD), multiple sclerosis (MS), or Parkinson’s. Participants completed questionnaires on two occasions, 12 months apart. There was an increase in severity of symptoms for people withMND, negative mood for people with HD and Parkinson’s, and social support satisfaction for people with MS. Regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of QOL for each group. Predictor variables were length of illness, symptoms (physical symptoms, control over body, cognitive symptoms and psychological symptoms), mood, relationship satisfaction and social support. Predictors of QOL were severity of symptoms for people withMND, HD and MS; negative mood for people withMNDand Parkinson’s; and social support satisfaction for people with MS. These results demonstrate the importance of illness severity and mood in predicting QOL, but also indicate differences between illness groups. The limited role played by social support and relationship is a surprising finding from the current study.

Mood and quality of life among people with progressive neurological illnesses
Marita P. McCabe,Lucy Firth,Elodie OConnor
International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology , 2009,
Abstract: El presente estudio ex post facto fue dise ado para examinar el estado de ánimo y la calidad de vida (QQL) entre 423 personas con enfermedad neurológica progresiva. En particular, se ha investigado la relación entre las variables de la enfermedad y el estado de ánimo y calidad de vida de 120 personas con enfermedad de la neuronales motoras (MND), 48 con enfermedad de Huntington (HD), 143 con Parkinson y 112 con esclerosis múltiple (MS). Los resultados demostraron que las personas con HD comparadas con los grupos con otras enfermedades experimentaban los síntomas más severos de enfermedad, el estado de ánimo más pobre y la más baja calidad de vida. Los síntomas psicológicos fueron predictores más fuertes del estado de ánimo y calidad de vida para todos los grupos, aunque hubo algunas diferencias entre los grupos de enfermedades. Los resultados de este estudio subrayan la importancia de desarrollar programas de información y tratamientos específicos en cuanto a la enfermedad junto con la incorporación de estrategias generalas para que las personas con enfermedades neurológicas progresivas puedan hacer frente a los síntomas de estos trastornos.
Jimmy, Sinclair, and Jim: on the biographical trail of James Sinclair Ross Jimmy, Sinclair, and Jim: on the biographical trail of James Sinclair Ross
John J. O'Connor
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: The deaths of Earle Birney and Robertson Davies late in 1995 reminded readers of Canadian literature that the old order—those writers born before the First World War—was quickly passing. Of the major figures born in the early years of this century (Birney, Davies, Callaghan, MacLennan, Ross), only Ross was still living at the beginning of 1996, albeit in very poor health in a nursing home in Vancouver. The deaths of Earle Birney and Robertson Davies late in 1995 reminded readers of Canadian literature that the old order—those writers born before the First World War—was quickly passing. Of the major figures born in the early years of this century (Birney, Davies, Callaghan, MacLennan, Ross), only Ross was still living at the beginning of 1996, albeit in very poor health in a nursing home in Vancouver.
A very large soul: selected letters from Margaret Laurence to Canadian writers A very large soul: selected letters from Margaret Laurence to Canadian writers
John J. O'Connor
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: “This will be a brief letter, as I have a horrifying stack of business letters to catch up on,” wrote Margaret Laurence to her friend and fellow novelist Gabrielle Roy in 1978, echoing an earlier lament to her epistolary friend Ernest Buckler about the need to “keep pace with the ghastly flow of business correspondence.” Although she was always to face some tension between her personal and professional selves as correspondent, her priority was never in question: “Must go. I have 70 letters to reply to, having got far behind in correspondence ... am trying now to communicate once again with dear friends first, and then to answer all the others, which will no doubt be my winter project” (4 Sept. 1974 letter to Silver Donald Cameron). “This will be a brief letter, as I have a horrifying stack of business letters to catch up on,” wrote Margaret Laurence to her friend and fellow novelist Gabrielle Roy in 1978, echoing an earlier lament to her epistolary friend Ernest Buckler about the need to “keep pace with the ghastly flow of business correspondence.” Although she was always to face some tension between her personal and professional selves as correspondent, her priority was never in question: “Must go. I have 70 letters to reply to, having got far behind in correspondence ... am trying now to communicate once again with dear friends first, and then to answer all the others, which will no doubt be my winter project” (4 Sept. 1974 letter to Silver Donald Cameron).
Jimmy, Sinclair, and Jim: on the biographical trail of James Sinclair Ross Jimmy, Sinclair, and Jim: on the biographical trail of James Sinclair Ross
John J. O'Connor
Ilha do Desterro , 2008,
Abstract: The deaths of Earle Birney and Robertson Davies late in 1995 reminded readers of Canadian literature that the old order—those writers born before the First World War—was quickly passing. Of the major figures born in the early years of this century (Birney, Davies, Callaghan, MacLennan, Ross), only Ross was still living at the beginning of 1996, albeit in very poor health in a nursing home in Vancouver. The deaths of Earle Birney and Robertson Davies late in 1995 reminded readers of Canadian literature that the old order—those writers born before the First World War—was quickly passing. Of the major figures born in the early years of this century (Birney, Davies, Callaghan, MacLennan, Ross), only Ross was still living at the beginning of 1996, albeit in very poor health in a nursing home in Vancouver.
Normal Perfusion Pressure Breakthrough Following AVM Resection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  [PDF]
T. E. OConnor, K. M. Fargen, J. Mocco
Open Journal of Modern Neurosurgery (OJMN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojmn.2013.34015
Abstract: Objective: To report a patient’s clinical course illustrative of the NPPB mechanism for hyperperfusion-induced injury. Methods: A 65-year-old female presented with a severe headache and was found to have a 6-cm right parietal AVM on imaging. The patient underwent staged, pre-operative embolization and the AVM was surgically resected without intra-operative complication. After the patient emerged from anesthesia she exhibited left hemiplegia and hemispatial neglect. Her systolic blood pressure (SBP) at that time was between 110-120 mmHg. SBP was reduced to 90-100 mmHg and the patient’s symptoms resolved shortly thereafter. The patient’s strict blood pressure goal was relaxed the next morning. However, with her SBP 110-120 mmHg in the ensuing hours, the patient’s left-sided neglect and hemiparesis returned. Her SBP was reduced again to 90-100 mmHg, leading to resolution of her symptoms. Results: This patient’s clinical course supports the NPPB theory of hyperperfusion-induced injury. Despite CT imaging demonstrating no residual AVM following resection, the patient developed neurological deficits in the immediate postoperative period. Aggressive systemic hypotension improved clinical symptoms repeatedly, whereas a brief period of normotension triggered a return of neurological deficits. As a result, there was a direct correlation between fluctuations of neurological status and SBP. This case suggests that the intrinsic autoregulatory capacity was altered in our patient, and that aggressive hypotension was necessary to compensate for diminished autonomic reactivity. Conclusions: This case provides further evidence that NPPB plays a role in hyperperfusion-induced injury following AVM excision and that blood pressure control is vital in managing hyperemic complications following complete resection of cerebral AVMs.
Challenges facing primary school educators of English Second (or Other) Language learners in the Western Cape
J O'Connor, M Geiger
South African Journal of Education , 2009,
Abstract: We were prompted by the prevalence of English Second or Other Language (ESOL) learners identified by educators as having language disorders and being referred for Speech-Language Therapy. We describe challenges faced by Grade 1, 2 and 3 educators at government schools in the Cape Metropolitan area who were working with such learners. Applying a mixed-methods descriptive design, a self-administered questionnaire and three focus groups were used for data collection. Educator perceptions and experiences regarding ESOL learners were described. Some participant educators at schools that were not former Model C schools had large classes, including large proportions of ESOL learners. Furthermore, there was a shortage of educators who were able to speak isiXhosa, the most frequently occurring first (or home) language of the region’s ESOL learners. Challenges faced by educators when teaching ESOL learners included learners’ academic and socio-emotional difficulties and a lack of parent involvement in their children’s education. Participant educators indicated a need for departmental, professional and parental support, and additional training and resources. Implications and recommendations for speech-language therapist and educator collaborations and speech-language therapists’ participation in educator training were identified.
An update of teriflunomide for treatment of multiple sclerosis
Oh J,O'Connor PW
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management , 2013,
Abstract: Jiwon Oh,1,2 Paul W O’Connor2 1Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Division of Neurology, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: There are a number of oral agents emerging as potential disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis (MS). Among these investigational agents, teriflunomide has shown promise in large, multicenter, phase III clinical trials with respect to safety and efficacy in relapsing MS patients, and is the latest disease-modifying agent approved for use in MS patients in the United States. This review will summarize teriflunomide's historical development, clinical pharmacology, studies in animals, clinical trials, and safety data, and will end with a discussion of the role of teriflunomide in MS in the context of existing treatment options. Keywords: teriflunomide, multiple sclerosis, clinical trials, review
A Role for Adenosine A1 Receptors in GABA and NMDA-Receptor Mediated Modulation of Dopamine Release: Studies Using Fast Cyclic Voltammetry
John J. OConnor,Carmel O’Neill
Sensors , 2008, DOI: 10.3390/s8095516
Abstract: In the striatum many neurotransmitters including GABA, glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine, nitric oxide and adenosine interact to regulate synaptic transmission. Dopamine release in the striatum is regulated by a number of pre- and postsynaptic receptors including adenosine. We have recently shown using isolated rat striatal slices, and the technique of fast cyclic voltammetry, that adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of dopamine release is modulated by dopamine D1 receptors. In the present study we have investigated the influence of NMDA and GABA receptor activation on the modulation of electrically stimulated dopamine release by adenosine. Application of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), concentration-dependently inhibited dopamine release to a maxiumum of 50%. Perfusion of the glutamate receptor agonist, NMDA, in low magnesium, caused a rapid and concentration-dependent inhibition of dopamine release. Prior perfusion with the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, DPCPX, significantly reduced the effect of 5 mM and 10 mM NMDA on dopamine release. The GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, had a significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on dopamine release which was reversed by prior application of the GABAA receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, but not DPCPX. Finally inhibition of dopamine release by CPA (1mM) was significantly enhanced by prior perfusion with picrotoxin. These data demonstrate an important role for GABA, NMDA and adenosine in the modulation of dopamine release.
Depression, Guilt, and Tibetan Buddhism  [PDF]
Lynn E. OConnor, Jack W. Berry, David J. Stiver, Rachna K. Rangan
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2012.329122
Abstract: Depression appears to be somewhat epidemic in the modern world. In prior empirical studies we found depression significantly associated with empathy-based guilt, empathic distress, and an overly active or misattributing moral system. In this study, we compared 98 Buddhists, who were primarily Tibetan meditation practitioners to 438 non-Buddhist, non-practicing community adults on a measure of depression along with measures of maladaptive guilt, empathic distress, anxiety and altruism. Our findings demonstrated that practitioners were significantly lower in depression, pathogenic guilt, anxiety, and empathic distress, and significantly higher on agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness to experience and compassionate altruism directed towards strangers. Intensity of practice significantly correlated with positive outcomes. In addition, we found that within the population of Tibetan Buddhist practitioners, those who endorsed the statement that the goal of meditation was other-focused (for the benefit of all sentient beings) were significantly lower in depression, empathic distress, and anxiety, and significantly higher in cognitive empathy (perspective-taking) compared to practitioners whose goal of meditation was self-focused.
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