oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 19 )

2018 ( 21 )

2017 ( 33 )

2016 ( 57 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 14070 matches for " Elizabeth Miller "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /14070
Display every page Item
Bilateral Vitreopapillary Traction Demonstrated by Optical Coherence Tomography Mistaken for Papilledema
Elizabeth Houle,Neil R. Miller
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/682659
Abstract: Purpose. The purpose of this study was to report a case of bilateral vitreopapillary traction, previously misdiagnosed as papilledema. Methods. A case report is presented of a 47-year-old woman with a prior diagnosis of papilledema, who is shown to have bilateral vitreopapillary traction rather than true optic disc swelling, confirmed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results. OCT showed vitreous traction surrounding the optic discs of both eyes. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated focal leakage of both discs. Conclusion. Bilateral disc elevation caused by vitreous traction can be confused with papilledema. In such cases, OCT can be used to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Although the phenomenon of vitreopapillary traction is well reported, this case indicates that not all ophthalmologists recognize the condition.
Bilateral Vitreopapillary Traction Demonstrated by Optical Coherence Tomography Mistaken for Papilledema
Elizabeth Houle,Neil R. Miller
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/682659
Abstract: Purpose. The purpose of this study was to report a case of bilateral vitreopapillary traction, previously misdiagnosed as papilledema. Methods. A case report is presented of a 47-year-old woman with a prior diagnosis of papilledema, who is shown to have bilateral vitreopapillary traction rather than true optic disc swelling, confirmed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results. OCT showed vitreous traction surrounding the optic discs of both eyes. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated focal leakage of both discs. Conclusion. Bilateral disc elevation caused by vitreous traction can be confused with papilledema. In such cases, OCT can be used to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Although the phenomenon of vitreopapillary traction is well reported, this case indicates that not all ophthalmologists recognize the condition. 1. Introduction Vitreopapillary traction (optic disc traction) is characterized by traction of the optic disc by a fibrocellular proliferating membrane or an incomplete posterior vitreous detachment [1]. It has been described in the context of diabetic retinopathy and has been observed in association with central retinal vein occlusion and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, suggesting a possible contributing factor to these disorders [2–4]. When the vitreous exerts traction on the optic nerve head, it can lead to elevation of the disc, obscuration of the disc margins, peripapillary hemorrhage, and even some disc leakage on fluorescein angiography, thus simulating true optic disc swelling. 2. Report of a Case A 47-year-old woman with mild hypercholesterolemia was referred to the Neuro-Ophthalmology Division of the Wilmer Eye Institute for evaluation of bilateral optic disc swelling. Two years earlier, she had complained of bilateral blurred vision and was noted to have bilateral optic disc elevation. Computed tomographic scanning, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR venography were reported to show no abnormalities. The patient was thought to have pseudotumor cerebri, started on acetazolamide, and referred to a neurologist. A year later, she underwent lumbar puncture that demonstrated an opening pressure of 18?mm H2O with normal cerebrospinal fluid content. She subsequently discontinued acetazolamide and presented to our clinic 1 year later because of persistent mild blurred vision. She denied a history of headache, transient visual obscurations, or tinnitus. Her only medication was an oral contraceptive agent. On examination, the patient had a body mass index of 26.6. Her visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes with
Exploring Young Students' Functional Thinking (Exploración del pensamiento funcional de estudiantes jóvenes)
Elizabeth Warren,Jodie Miller,Thomas J. Cooper
PNA , 2013,
Abstract: The Early Years Generalising Project (EYGP) involves Australian Years 1-4 (age 5-9) students and investigates how they grasp and express generalisations. This paper focuses on data collected from six Year 1 students in an exploratory study within a clinical interview setting that required students to identify function rules. Preliminary findings suggest that the use of gestures (both by students and interviewers), self-talk (by students), and concrete acting out, assisted students to reach generalisations and to begin to express these generalities. It also appears that as students become aware of the structure, their use of gestures and self- talk tended to decrease. El Early Years Generalizing Project (EYGP) implica a estudiantes de primer a cuarto curso de la educación primaria australiana (de 5 a 9 a os) e investiga cómo comprenden y expresan las generalizaciones. Este artículo se centra en los datos recogidos de 6 estudiantes de primer curso en un estudio exploratorio con entrevista clínica que requería que los estudiantes identificaran patrones funcionales. Los resultados preliminares sugieren que el uso de los gestos (de estudiantes y entrevistadores), las conversaciones con ellos mismos (de estudiantes), y las actuaciones concretas, ayudaron a los estudiantes a buscar generalizaciones y a comenzar a expresar estas generalidades. También parece que cuando los estudiantes tomaron conciencia de la estructura, el uso de gestos y de las conversaciones con ellos mismos tendió a disminuir.
Family routines within the ecological niche: an analysis of the psychological well-being of U.S. caregivers of children with disabilities
Elizabeth Larson,Thomas Miller-Bishoff
Frontiers in Psychology , 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00495
Abstract: Using mixed methods, this study examined the relationship of caregivers of children with disabilities’ psychological well-being (PWB) and their orchestration of daily routines within their ecological niche. Thirty-nine U.S. caregivers completed in-depth interviews, PWB Scales, and Family Time and Routines Index (FTRI). We used a multi-step analysis. Interview data was coded and vignettes created without knowledge of PWB and FTRI ratings. Next, the relationship of quantitative measures was analyzed. Four groups were created using FTRI-extent and PWB means: (1) low routine-low PWB, (2) low routine-high PWB, (3) high routine-low PWB, and (4) high routine-high PWB. We examined qualitative differences in key features between groups. Findings: Total PWB and FTRI scores were not significantly correlated, PWB Purpose in Life and FTRI-extent scores were moderately positively correlated, and PWB Environmental Mastery and FTRI-extent correlation approached significance. Qualitative findings describe caregivers’ structuring of routines, intensity of oversight, support in routines, management of dinner, paid work, and needs for respite. The four groups differed in paid work, household support, degree the child could self-occupy, Environmental Mastery, and opportunities to recuperate. Caregivers with higher levels of well-being and more regular routines did paid work, had supportive spouses, had children who more often could follow routines, had higher Environmental Mastery, could orchestrate a family meal, and had breaks from care in either work or leisure. All Native American caregivers and Mexican American caregivers with spouses were in the high routine-high PWB group. Insight into this complex negotiation between family members within daily routines may provide practitioners a better understanding of how to work within family circles to foster therapeutic alliances, identify focused intervention targets, and promote positive family wide outcomes.
”Theory, Method & the Future of Pre-Columbian Art History”, 100th Annual Conference of the College Art Association - Los Angeles, California - February 24, 2010” Contributors: Cecelia F. Klein, Introductions; Esther Pasztory, ‘Pre-Columbian Art and World Art History’; Mary Miller, ‘Now You See It, Now You Don’t: Pre-Columbian Art in the American Museum . . . and in the Academy’; Elizabeth Hill Boo
Cecelia F. Klein,Esther Pasztory,Mary Miller,Elizabeth Hill Boone
Journal of Art Historiography , 2012,
Abstract: Since the founding of the academic field of Pre-Columbian art history in the mid 20th century, the training of and work by Pre-Columbianists have changed substantially. Whereas the first Pre-Columbian art historians drew heavily on their knowledge of art history, other disciplines, and theory writ large, younger Pre-Columbian art historians today tend to specialize in one area and one time period, and to write primarily for fellow specialists with interests similar to their own. Increasingly little effort is made to render Pre-Columbian art history relevant to a broader public, whether that public comprise scholars in other fields or laypersons. One of the last fields to have been fully accepted by college and university art history departments in the U.S., Pre-Columbian art history also has always been among the first to go during an economic downturn. During this session, following brief presentations by the speakers and the discussant, there will be a panel conversation in which the audience may participate. The goal will be to assess where the field might and should go in the decades to come.
Robotics to Enable Older Adults to Remain Living at Home
Alan J. Pearce,Brooke Adair,Kimberly Miller,Elizabeth Ozanne
Journal of Aging Research , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/538169
Abstract:
Comparing the Immunogenicity of AS03-Adjuvanted 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine with Clinical Protection in Priority Risk Groups in England
Chee-Fu Yung, Nick Andrews, Katja Hoschler, Elizabeth Miller
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056844
Abstract: In England, during pandemic 2009 H1N1, vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity population studies in priority groups were rolled out in parallel to evaluate the pandemic vaccination programme. This provided a unique opportunity to compare immunogenicity and clinical protection in the same population and thus provide insights into the correlates of protection for the pandemic H1N1 2009 vaccine in risk groups. While clinical protection from AS03-adjuvanted pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine was high in those aged <25 years and pregnant women, effectiveness in older adults with chronic conditions has been found to be surprisingly poor. Here we present results from the immunogenicity study derived from the same population. Individuals from priority groups eligible for pandemic vaccination attending participating general practices were recruited. Pre and post-vaccination blood samples were collected and HI antibody testing to assess immune response to vaccination performed. The final cohort consisted of 610 individuals: 60 healthy children aged <5 years; 32 healthy pregnant women; 518 individuals from risk groups. Seroconversion rate in healthy children aged <5 years (87%, 95% CI: 75% to 94%) was higher than that of risk groups combined (65%, 95% CI: 61% to 69%) (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis of risk groups showed that the size of response in those who did seroconvert was lower in those who received the 2009/10 seasonal TIV (Fold effect: 0.52, 0.35 to 0.78). Predicted immunological boosting from higher pre-vaccine titres after 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccination only occurred in children (seroconversion rate = 92%) and not in individuals aged 10 to 39 from risk groups (seroconversion rate = 74%). The lack of clinical protection identified in the same population in older adults from risk groups could be attributed to these lower seroresponses. Current immunogenicity licensing criteria for pandemic influenza vaccine may not correlate with clinical protection in individuals with chronic disease or immunocompromised.
Effect of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype-Specific Carriage and Invasive Disease in England: A Cross-Sectional Study
Stefan Flasche ,Albert Jan Van Hoek,Elizabeth Sheasby,Pauline Waight,Nick Andrews,Carmen Sheppard,Robert George,Elizabeth Miller
PLOS Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001017
Abstract: Background We investigated the effect of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) programme in England on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease to help understand its role in serotype replacement and predict the impact of higher valency vaccines. Methods and Findings Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from children <5 y old and family members (n = 400) 2 y after introduction of PCV7 into routine immunization programs. Proportions carrying Streptococcus pneumoniae and serotype distribution among carried isolates were compared with a similar population prior to PCV7 introduction. Serotype-specific case:carrier ratios (CCRs) were estimated using national data on invasive disease. In vaccinated children and their contacts vaccine-type (VT) carriage decreased, but was offset by an increase in non-VT carriage, with no significant overall change in carriage prevalence, odds ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76–1.49). The lower CCRs of the replacing serotypes resulted in a net reduction in invasive disease in children. The additional serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines had low carriage but high disease prevalence. Serotype 11C emerged as predominant in carriage but caused no invasive disease whereas 8, 12F, and 22F emerged in disease but had very low carriage prevalence. Conclusion Because the additional serotypes included in PCV10/13 have high CCRs but low carriage prevalence, vaccinating against them is likely to significantly reduce invasive disease with less risk of serotype replacement. However, a few serotypes with high CCRs could mitigate the benefits of higher valency vaccines. Assessment of the effect of PCV on carriage as well as invasive disease should be part of enhanced surveillance activities for PCVs. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
The Impact of Pandemic Influenza H1N1 on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Prospective Population-Based Study
Albert Jan van Hoek,Anthony Underwood,Mark Jit,Elizabeth Miller,W. John Edmunds
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017030
Abstract: While the H1N1v influenza pandemic in 2009 was clinically mild, with a low case-fatality rate, the overall disease burden measured in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) lost has not been estimated. Such a measure would allow comparison with other diseases and assessment of the cost-effectiveness of pandemic control measures.
Mathematical Modelling Long-Term Effects of Replacing Prevnar7 with Prevnar13 on Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases in England and Wales
Yoon Hong Choi, Mark Jit, Stefan Flasche, Nigel Gay, Elizabeth Miller
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039927
Abstract: Introduction England and Wales recently replaced the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) with its 13-valent equivalent (PCV13), partly based on projections from mathematical models of the long-term impact of such a switch compared to ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether. Methods A compartmental deterministic model was used to estimate parameters governing transmission of infection and competition between different groups of pneumococcal serotypes prior to the introduction of PCV13. The best-fitting parameters were used in an individual based model to describe pneumococcal transmission dynamics and effects of various options for the vaccination programme change in England and Wales. A number of scenarios were conducted using (i) different assumptions about the number of invasive pneumococcal disease cases adjusted for the increasing trend in disease incidence prior to PCV7 introduction in England and Wales, and (ii) a range of values representing serotype replacement induced by vaccination of the additional six serotypes in PCV13. Results Most of the scenarios considered suggest that ceasing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use would cause an increase in invasive pneumococcal disease incidence, while replacing PCV7 with PCV13 would cause an overall decrease. However, the size of this reduction largely depends on the level of competition induced by the additional serotypes in PCV13. The model estimates that over 20 years of PCV13 vaccination, around 5000–62000 IPD cases could be prevented compared to stopping pneumococcal conjugate vaccination altogether. Conclusion Despite inevitable uncertainty around serotype replacement effects following introduction of PCV13, the model suggests a reduction in overall invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in all cases. Our results provide useful evidence on the benefits of PCV13 to countries replacing or considering replacing PCV7 with PCV13, as well as data that can be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of such a switch.
Page 1 /14070
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.