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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 12044 matches for " Elizabeth Ann; "
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Working in Long-Term Residential Care: A Qualitative Metasummary Encompassing Roles, Working Environments, Work Satisfaction, and Factors Affecting Recruitment and Retention of Nurse Aides
Elizabeth Ann Andersen
Global Journal of Health Science , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v1n2p2
Abstract: By means of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Ageline (AARP) database searches, the author presents a review of the literature addressing residential care aides- their roles, working environments, work satisfaction, and factors affecting recruitment and retention. Using the method of qualitative metasummary, eight broad themes emerged: job dissatisfaction, low wages, attrition and retention difficulties, threats to personal safety, the experience of hierarchy (devaluation and domination), the importance of relationships and collegial support, excessive workloads and inadequate training. Heavy reliance on American research is a limitation, but there appears to be general agreement across eight countries that residential care aide work can be arduous, demanding and demoralizing. At the same time, given the constraints that most aides work under, many aides care greatly about their clients and are very concerned about the quality of care that they are able to provide. Their voices, however, remain relatively overlooked or ignored.
Infection control – delivering the message in the 21st century
Bryce, Elizabeth Ann
GMS Krankenhaushygiene Interdisziplin?r , 2007,
Abstract: The experiences gleaned from new and suddenly emergent infectious diseases (e.g. SARS, avian influenza or diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile) have highlighted how important it is, also for infection prophylaxis, to be able to find instruments for rapid and effective communication. Since 1990 online (E) learning has been used to train nursing staff and offers the advantage of being able to study at an individual pace as well as cut down on the time and financial resources needed. It serves to overcome geographic distances in respect of the teaching institution, can be used at any time of day according to individual needs and has proved suitable for presenting learning modules in infection prevention. No doubt, traditional didactic learning continues to be the most important approach, but new technologies such as “problem based learning” (PBL) are becoming more popular, and allow students to acquire knowledge in concrete situations. Translating knowledge into behavior calls for an ability to convert scientific theoretic knowledge quickly, efficiently and clearly into practical behavior. Hence E learning is an ideal way to ensure that the latter requirements are met. While it is obvious that knowledge can be easily imparted by this method, further research is needed to establish whether and to what extent it is possible to use this method to translate the acquired knowledge into altered behavior too. Experts believe that novel media technologies hold out several new prospects for accomplishing this.
Disparities in Oral Health among School-Aged Children in Kansas  [PDF]
Frank Dong, Elizabeth Ablah, Robert Hines, Ann Lazar, Judy Johnston
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2015.56032
Abstract: Background: The effects of age, rural-urban geographic location, and percentage of Free and Reduced Price Meal Program (FRPMP) participation on children’s oral health outcome measures (untreated decay, treated decay, and sealants) have not been fully explored in Kansas. Methods: The current study utilized a surveillance sample of 140,217 children (grades K through 12) attending 200 schools in Kansas, which requested screening assistance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) from 2012 to 2013. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify significant factors associated with oral health outcome measures. Results: Older children were associated with decreased odds of having untreated decay, and increased odds of having treated decay and sealants. Children attending very rural schools had increased odds of untreated and treated decay and decreased odds of presence of sealants. For every 5% increase in the school-level %FRPMP, the odds of having untreated and treated decay increased by 5% and 3%, respectively. However, %FRPMP was not statistically associated with the presence of sealants. Conclusions: Children attending schools in very rural and rural areas appear to have worse oral health outcomes, as measured by higher proportions of untreated and treated decay, and a smaller proportion of presence of sealants.
Improved triage and emergency care for children reduces inpatient mortality in a resource-constrained setting
Molyneux,Elizabeth; Ahmad,Shafique; Robertson,Ann;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862006000400016
Abstract: problem: early assessment, prioritization for treatment and management of sick children attending a health service are critical to achieving good outcomes. many hospitals in developing countries see large numbers of patients and have few staff, so patients often have to wait before being assessed and treated. approach: we present the example of a busy under-fives clinic that provided outpatient services, immunizations and treatment for medical emergencies. the clinic was providing an inadequate service resulting in some inappropriate admissions and a high case-fatality rate. we assessed the deficiencies and sought resources to improve services. local setting: a busy paediatric outpatient clinic in a public tertiary care hospital in blantyre, malawi. relevant changes: the main changes we made were to train staff in emergency care and triage, improve patient flow through the department and to develop close cooperation between inpatient and outpatient services. training coincided with a restructuring of the physical layout of the department. the changes were put in place when the department reopened in january 2001. lessons learned: improvements in the process and delivery of care and the ability to prioritize clinical management are essential to good practice. making the changes described above has streamlined the delivery of care and led to a reduction in inpatient mortality from 10-18% before the changes were made (before 2001) to 6-8% after.
A qualitative enquiry into learner experience of utilising concept maps as a learning method in physical science
Elizabeth Steyn,Piet J Ankiewicz,Ann Miiller
Health SA Gesondheid , 1998, DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v4i3.363
Abstract: The aim of this study was to describe the experience of learners who utilise concept maps as a learning method in Physical Science. Opsomming Die doel met die studie was om die ervaring van leerders, wat begripskaarte as leermetode in Natuur- en Skeikunde gebruik, te beskryf. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.
The Relationship between Life Stress and Breastfeeding Outcomes among Low-Income Mothers
Ann M. Dozier,Alice Nelson,Elizabeth Brownell
Advances in Preventive Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/902487
Abstract:
Improved triage and emergency care for children reduces inpatient mortality in a resource-constrained setting
Molyneux Elizabeth,Ahmad Shafique,Robertson Ann
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006,
Abstract: PROBLEM: Early assessment, prioritization for treatment and management of sick children attending a health service are critical to achieving good outcomes. Many hospitals in developing countries see large numbers of patients and have few staff, so patients often have to wait before being assessed and treated. APPROACH: We present the example of a busy Under-Fives Clinic that provided outpatient services, immunizations and treatment for medical emergencies. The clinic was providing an inadequate service resulting in some inappropriate admissions and a high case-fatality rate. We assessed the deficiencies and sought resources to improve services. LOCAL SETTING: A busy paediatric outpatient clinic in a public tertiary care hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. RELEVANT CHANGES: The main changes we made were to train staff in emergency care and triage, improve patient flow through the department and to develop close cooperation between inpatient and outpatient services. Training coincided with a restructuring of the physical layout of the department. The changes were put in place when the department reopened in January 2001. LESSONS LEARNED: Improvements in the process and delivery of care and the ability to prioritize clinical management are essential to good practice. Making the changes described above has streamlined the delivery of care and led to a reduction in inpatient mortality from 10-18% before the changes were made (before 2001) to 6-8% after.
Abl Family Kinases Regulate Endothelial Barrier Function In Vitro and in Mice
Elizabeth M. Chislock, Ann Marie Pendergast
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085231
Abstract: The maintenance of endothelial barrier function is essential for normal physiology, and increased vascular permeability is a feature of a wide variety of pathological conditions, leading to complications including edema and tissue damage. Use of the pharmacological inhibitor imatinib, which targets the Abl family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Abl and Arg), as well as other tyrosine kinases including the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), Kit, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and discoidin domain receptors, has shown protective effects in animal models of inflammation, sepsis, and other pathologies characterized by enhanced vascular permeability. However, the imatinib targets involved in modulation of vascular permeability have not been well-characterized, as imatinib inhibits multiple tyrosine kinases not only in endothelial cells and pericytes but also immune cells important for disorders associated with pathological inflammation and abnormal vascular permeability. In this work we employ endothelial Abl knockout mice to show for the first time a direct role for Abl in the regulation of vascular permeability in vivo. Using both Abl/Arg-specific pharmacological inhibition and endothelial Abl knockout mice, we demonstrate a requirement for Abl kinase activity in the induction of endothelial permeability by vascular endothelial growth factor both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, Abl kinase inhibition also impaired endothelial permeability in response to the inflammatory mediators thrombin and histamine. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Abl kinase activity was accompanied by activation of the barrier-stabilizing GTPases Rac1 and Rap1, as well as inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization and generation of acto-myosin contractility. In all, these findings suggest that pharmacological targeting of the Abl kinases may be capable of inhibiting endothelial permeability induced by a broad range of agonists and that use of Abl kinase inhibitors may have potential for the treatment of disorders involving pathological vascular leakage.
The Relationship between Life Stress and Breastfeeding Outcomes among Low-Income Mothers
Ann M. Dozier,Alice Nelson,Elizabeth Brownell
Advances in Preventive Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/902487
Abstract: Stressful life events during pregnancy negatively affect maternal and infant outcomes including breastfeeding initiation. Their impact on breastfeeding duration is uncertain. Given breastfeeding's important health benefits we analyzed stressful life event types and cessation of any and exclusive breastfeeding by 4 and 13 weeks. Methods. We collected self-administered survey data at 5–7 months postpartum from over 700 primarily urban low-income US mothers. Data covered prepregnancy, prenatal, and postpartum periods including 14 stressful life events (categorized into financial, emotional, partner-associated, traumatic). Analyses included only mothers initiating breastfeeding ( ). Logistic regressions controlled for maternal characteristics including a breastfeeding plan. Results. All four stress categories were associated with shorter duration of any and exclusive breastfeeding. In the adjusted models, statistically significant relationships remained for financial stress (4 weeks cessation of any breastfeeding duration) and traumatic stress (13 weeks exclusive breastfeeding cessation). Controlling for stress, a longer breastfeeding plan was significantly associated with a shorter breastfeeding duration (all models) as was depression during pregnancy and current smoking (several models). Conclusions. Among low-income women, impact of stressful life events on cessation of breastfeeding may differ by stress type and interfere with achievement of breastfeeding goal. Among these stressed mothers, breastfeeding may serve as a coping mechanism. 1. Introduction Optimal breastfeeding duration and exclusivity practices contribute to significant short- and long-term health benefits for both mother and baby [1, 2]. Current professional associations, including the World Health Organization recommend exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continued breastfeeding for at least a year [3, 4]. In the USA, efforts by professional, government, and health and human service organizations to increase breastfeeding rates resulted in increasing initiation rates [5, 6]. Duration and exclusivity remain well below national goals, especially among low-income mothers [7]. Numerous factors influence breastfeeding outcomes from institutional practices to individual characteristics and actions [8–10]. The latter include demographic and maternal factors such as maternal race/ethnicity (non-white and/or Hispanic) [11], less education [12], elevated prepregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI) [13], language (English speaking) [14], and younger age [11], all of which are associated with early
Radioecology: Why Bother?  [PDF]
Emily Amanda Caffrey, Mary Elizabeth Leonard, Jonathan Bamberger Napier, Delvan Reed Neville, Kathryn Ann Higley
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2014.53022
Abstract:

The importance of radioecology to the discussion of radioactive contamination is discussed here. This paper discusses the history of radioecology, alongside the most recent developments in the science. It describes the need for more environmental data, and explains where the gaps in current knowledge lie. The calculation of radiation dose to wildlife along with the complications in performing such calculations is discussed. The paper also tackles the difficult question of the implications of radioecology on nuclear waste management and site decommissioning policies. From the beginnings of the science to today, radioecology is poised to be an important field of study as humans continue to rely on ionizing radiation to improve their lives.

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