oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 1 )

2018 ( 10 )

2017 ( 9 )

2016 ( 14 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3889 matches for " Edwards ME "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /3889
Display every page Item
Is video review of patient encounters an effective tool for medical student learning? A review of the literature
Hammoud MM, Morgan HK, Edwards ME, Lyon JA, White C
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S20219
Abstract: video review of patient encounters an effective tool for medical student learning? A review of the literature Review (2464) Total Article Views Authors: Hammoud MM, Morgan HK, Edwards ME, Lyon JA, White C Published Date March 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 19 - 30 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S20219 Received: 15 November 2011 Accepted: 14 December 2011 Published: 22 March 2012 Maya M Hammoud1, Helen K Morgan1, Mary E Edwards2, Jennifer A Lyon2, Casey White3 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Health Sciences Center Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Faculty Affairs and Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: To determine if video review of student performance during patient encounters is an effective tool for medical student learning. Methods: Multiple bibliographic databases that include medical, general health care, education, psychology, and behavioral science literature were searched for the following terms: medical students, medical education, undergraduate medical education, education, self-assessment, self-evaluation, self-appraisal, feedback, videotape, video recording, televised, and DVD. The authors examined all abstracts resulting from this search and reviewed the full text of the relevant articles as well as additional articles identified in the reference lists of the relevant articles. Studies were classified by year of student (preclinical or clinical) and study design (controlled or non-controlled). Results: A total of 67 articles met the final search criteria and were fully reviewed. Most studies were non-controlled and performed in the clinical years. Although the studies were quite variable in quality, design, and outcomes, in general video recording of performance and subsequent review by students with expert feedback had positive outcomes in improving feedback and ultimate performance. Video review with self-assessment alone was not found to be generally effective, but when linked with expert feedback it was superior to traditional feedback alone. Conclusion: There are many methods for integrating effective use of video-captured performance into a program of learning. We recommend combining student self-assessment with feedback from faculty or other trained individuals for maximum effectiveness. We also recommend additional research in this area.
Is video review of patient encounters an effective tool for medical student learning? A review of the literature
Hammoud MM,Morgan HK,Edwards ME,Lyon JA
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Maya M Hammoud1, Helen K Morgan1, Mary E Edwards2, Jennifer A Lyon2, Casey White31Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Health Sciences Center Libraries, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3Graduate Medical Education, Faculty Affairs and Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USAPurpose: To determine if video review of student performance during patient encounters is an effective tool for medical student learning.Methods: Multiple bibliographic databases that include medical, general health care, education, psychology, and behavioral science literature were searched for the following terms: medical students, medical education, undergraduate medical education, education, self-assessment, self-evaluation, self-appraisal, feedback, videotape, video recording, televised, and DVD. The authors examined all abstracts resulting from this search and reviewed the full text of the relevant articles as well as additional articles identified in the reference lists of the relevant articles. Studies were classified by year of student (preclinical or clinical) and study design (controlled or non-controlled).Results: A total of 67 articles met the final search criteria and were fully reviewed. Most studies were non-controlled and performed in the clinical years. Although the studies were quite variable in quality, design, and outcomes, in general video recording of performance and subsequent review by students with expert feedback had positive outcomes in improving feedback and ultimate performance. Video review with self-assessment alone was not found to be generally effective, but when linked with expert feedback it was superior to traditional feedback alone.Conclusion: There are many methods for integrating effective use of video-captured performance into a program of learning. We recommend combining student self-assessment with feedback from faculty or other trained individuals for maximum effectiveness. We also recommend additional research in this area.Keywords: feedback tools, self-assessment of performance, self-directed learning with feedback, feedback and self-assessment, video review of performance with feedback
Predicting the Outcome of Nerve Conduction Studies in Patients with Suspected Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Using an Existing Carpal Tunnel Assessment Tool  [PDF]
Carl Edwards, Ian Frampton
Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (OJTR) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojtr.2014.22010
Abstract: This service evaluation and pilot study was designed to establish whether a clinical questionnaire could be incorporated within our Secondary Care Carpal Tunnel Service. The purpose of the questionnaire is to predict the positive and negative results of Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) in those patients with suspected Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. The hand specialist, preceding NCS administered the questionnaire; it was then scored at a later date. Results showed a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 84% referring to the ability to predict a positive NCS when using a predetermined cut-off score. When analysed with Receiver Operating Characteristics, a threshold score could be determined in order to obtain 100% sensitivity/specificity. This questionnaire can be used as a useful adjunct to assessment of those presenting with suspected Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Using the questionnaire to identify those patients scoring outside a predetermined threshold range would reduce the need for NCS by nearly 50%, with significant cost and clinical practice implications.
Editorial: Is Electroconvulsive Therapy a Therapy with Future?  [PDF]
Jér?me Palazzolo
Open Journal of Depression (OJD) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojd.2013.23004
Abstract: Editorial: Is Electroconvulsive Therapy a Therapy with Future?
Breast Cancer Therapies Present and Future  [PDF]
Jessica Kalra, Lincoln A. Edwards
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2012.36149
Abstract: Significant advances in breast cancer treatment have been made where it is now possible to treat localized disease to a curable state. However, for approximately 30% of women with primary disease, metastatic breast cancer (MBC) or recurrent disease, treatment has remained challenging. Major obstacles in the effective treatment of breast cancer in these populations include: 1) the molecular heterogeneity of the disease; 2) treatment of MBC and more specifically brain metastasis; and 3) defining combination therapies that address the evolution of resistance with disease relapse. The acknowledgement of these difficulties has led to an effort to further understand the roadblocks to therapy with the anticipation that more appropriate treatments will result. Here we describe the current state of breast cancer treatment, and the potential for improved therapy.
Expanding public health professionals’ roles in promoting and supporting breastfeeding as optimal infant feeding: A pilot study with online tutorial implications  [PDF]
Amna Umer, Roger A. Edwards
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2013.32025
Abstract:

Background: Their knowledge of preventive health, coupled with their dynamic roles in the community, puts public health professionals in a key position to expand their roles in the health promotion and support of breastfeeding as optimal infant feeding. This online tutorial was created to increase public health professionals’ knowledge about breastfeeding and to assess their attitudes in supporting healthy behaviors related to infant feeding as a health promotion strategy. Method: The study utilized an online breastfeeding tutorial based on the US Breast-feeding Committee recommendations for minimum breastfeeding knowledge for health professionals. Pre- and post-tutorial questionnaires assessed breastfeeding knowledge, and an attitudinal survey evaluated attitudes of public health professionals after the tutorial. Exposing public health students to this information can facilitate the early shaping of their attitudes and understanding about the importance of breastfeeding. Results: Fifty-two Northeastern University MPH students and alumni (62% response rate) completed the study. There was an overall gain in participants’ fundamental knowledge regarding breastfeeding as assessed by pre- (77%) to post-tutorial (97%) correct responses (p = 0.00001). The post-tutorial attitudinal survey showed that 92% of participants were comfortable in answering questions about breastfeeding as part of their professional responsibilities. Conclusion: This pilot study highlights the important role that a short online tutorial can play in expanding public health professionals’ knowledge about breastfeeding. Greater use of online methods can enhance awareness of critical health behaviors, such as breastfeeding, that have not received adequate attention in public health curricula. This pilot study provides the foundation for a larger study. Integration of breastfeeding into public health professionals’ core training could support broader social change.

Urban Wastewater Treatment by Adsorption of Organic Matters on Modified Bentonite by (Iron-Aluminum)  [PDF]
Me?abih Zohra, Jér?me Rose, Daniel Borschneck
Journal of Encapsulation and Adsorption Sciences (JEAS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jeas.2014.43008
Abstract: In this research, the natural bentonite clay (from Maghnia, western Algeria) was purified (Na+- montmorillonite, CEC = 91 meq/100 g), noted (puri.bent) and modified with mixed hydroxy-Fe-Al (FeAl-PILC). The purified bentonite clay and FeAl-PILC were heated at 383 K for 2 hr and characte-rized by the chemical analyses data, XRD, and N2 adsorption to 77 K techniques. Puri.bent and FeAl-PILC were applied to fix the organic matter (OM) present in urban wastewater from the city of Sidi Bel-Abbes (western Algeria). The adsorption of organic matter was followed by spectro-photometry at 470 nm, and the adsorption data were a good fit with Freundlich isotherm for pu-ri.bent but for FeA-lPILC, were well fit by Elovitch isotherm model. The maximum adsorption ca-pacity (qm) was 571.6 mg/g for puri.bent and 1120.69 mg/g for FeAl-PLC. The degree of OM removal was 67% for puri.bent and 97% for FeAl-PILC. FeAl-PILC can be considered as a promising adsorbent for the removal of OM from wastewater.
Genetic variation in tolerance of brown trout to acidic water
DJ Edwards
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1978, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-10-4-601c
Abstract:
Small genomes and big science
Jeremy Edwards
Genome Biology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/gb-2006-7-3-308
Abstract: The presentations from the 2005 Annual Conference on Microbial Genomes focused on diverse areas of microbial genomics - from the evolution of enterobacteria to structural genomics and systems biology. An overriding theme of the meeting was the importance of new technologies and tools for functional genomics and how they are being used to understand microbial physiology. This meeting took a big step forward in showing how to take advantage of the increasing availability of microbial genomes to fill in the gap between functional genomics and physiology. This report discusses a few of the many highlights of the meeting in the fields of metagenomics, structural genomics, new genomics technologies and systems biology.A number of presentations focused on the metagenomics of species groups and the analysis of microbial communities, rather than on individual species or strains. Jeremy Glasner (University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA) discussed the parallel evolution of pathogenicity in enterobacteria. From his results, a new view of genome evolution in the enterobacteria emerges - one in which the genomes of species are incredibly dynamic and genes are exchanged between strains and species. Glasner's work analyzes sequences that have been completed in more traditional genome-sequencing projects, where individual strains are analyzed in isolation. A complementary approach is that of Jizhong Zhou (Oak Ridge National Laborary, Oak Ridge, USA), who described his work on the metagenomic analysis of microbial communities in uranium-contaminated groundwaters. Zhou shotgun-sequenced the DNA isolated from a mixed community of microbes and analyzed the sequence in an attempt to understand this complex community. He and his colleagues sequenced 60 Mb from the uranium-contaminated soil samples and identified a composite sequence of approximately 6 Mb in 879 contigs. They were unable to determine exactly how many species made up the community, but they did identify Azoarcus species (at le
Genetic manipulation of the mammary gland by transplantation
P Edwards
Breast Cancer Research , 2003, DOI: 10.1186/bcr665
Abstract:
Page 1 /3889
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.