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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 461724 matches for " Duria A Rayis "
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Severe anaemia is associated with a higher risk for preeclampsia and poor perinatal outcomes in Kassala hospital, eastern Sudan
AbdelAziem A Ali, Duria A Rayis, Tajeldin M Abdallah, Mustafa I Elbashir, Ishag Adam
BMC Research Notes , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-4-311
Abstract: This is a retrospective case-control study conducted at Kassala hospital, eastern Sudan. Medical files of pregnant women with severe anaemia (haemoglobin (Hb) < 7 g/dl, n = 303) who delivered from January 2008 to December 2010 were reviewed. Socio-demographic and obstetric data were analysed and compared with a similar number of women with mild/moderate anaemia (Hb = 7-10.9 g/dl, n = 303) and with no anaemia (Hb > 11 g/dl, n = 303). Logistic regression analysis was performed separately for each of the outcome measures: preeclampsia, eclampsia, preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW) and stillbirth.There were 9578 deliveries at Kassala hospital, 4012 (41.8%) women had anaemia and 303 (3.2%) had severe anaemia. The corrected risk for preeclampsia increased only in severe anaemia (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.4-9.1, P = 0.007). Compared with women with no anaemia, the risk of LBW was 2.5 times higher in women with mild/moderate anaemia (95% CI: 1.1-5.7), and 8.0 times higher in women with severe anaemia (95% CI: 3.8-16.0). The risk of preterm delivery increased significantly with the severity of anaemia (OR = 3.2 for women with mild/moderate anaemia and OR = 6.6 for women with severe anaemia, compared with women with no anaemia). The corrected risk for stillbirth increased only in severe anaemia (OR = 4.3, 95% CI: 1.9-9.1, P < 0.001).The greater the severity of the anaemia during pregnancy, the greater the risk of preeclampsia, preterm delivery, LBW and stillbirth. Preventive measures should be undertaken to decrease the prevalence of anaemia in pregnancy.Anaemia during pregnancy is a major public health problem, especially in developing countries [1]. It affects 41.8% of pregnant women globally, with the highest prevalence in Africa [2]. There is however significant variation in the prevalence of anaemia both within and between countries, necessitating a need for local data to help to improve preventive programmes. Anaemia during pregnancy, especially severe anaemia, is associat
Use of family planning methods in Kassala, Eastern Sudan
Abdel Aziem A Ali, Duria A Rayis, Mona Mamoun, Ishag Adam
BMC Research Notes , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-4-43
Abstract: Across sectional community-based study was conducted during the period February-April 2010 to investigate the use of family planning in Kassala, eastern Sudan. Structured questionnaires were used to gather socio-demographic data and use of family planning. The mean ± SD of the age and parity of 613 enrolled women was 31.1 ± 7 years and 3.4 ± 1.9, respectively. Only 44.0% of these women had previously or currently used one or more of the family planning methods. Combined pills (46.7%) and progesterone injection (17.8%) were the predominant method used by the investigated women. While age, residence were not associated with the use of family planning, parity (> five), couple education (≥ secondary level) were significantly associated with the use of family planning. Husband objection and religious beliefs were the main reasons of non-use of family planning.Education, encouragement of health education programs and involvement of the religious persons might promote family planning in eastern Sudan.High fertility rate and inadequate spacing between births, can lead to high maternal and infant mortality. An estimated 600 000 maternal deaths occur worldwide each year; the vast majority of these take place in developing countries. WHO estimates that 13% of these deaths are due to unsafe abortion. Worldwide, where approximately 50 million women resort to induced abortion, frequently results in high maternal morbidity and mortality [1,2]. Thus, family planning and spacing among births are one of the methods to avoid these deaths. Promotion of family planning and contraceptive use is highly adopted by the international community as one of the strategy to reduce the maternal mortality and to reach the Millennium Development Goals [3-5]. Africa characterized by high rate of lack to contraceptive access reaching 57% and this lack lead to unwanted pregnancies, increased demand to abortion and death related to unsafe abortion [6].In Sudan, the largest African country, there is unac
Epidemiology of underweight and overweight-obesity among term pregnant Sudanese women
Duria A Rayis, Ameer O Abbaker, Yasir Salih, Tayseer E Diab, Ishag Adam
BMC Research Notes , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1756-0500-3-327
Abstract: Out of 1690 term pregnant women, 628 (37.1%) were primigravidae, 926 (54.8%) had ≥ secondary educational level (minimum of 8 years) and 1445 (85.5%) were housewives. The mean (SD) of the age and parity were 27.2 (6.3) years and 2.0 (2.1) respectively. Out of these 1690 women, 94(5.5%) were underweight (BMI of ≤ 19.9 Kg/m2), 603 (35.6%) were overweight (BMI of 25 - 29.9 Kg/m2) and 328 (19.4%) were obese (BMI of ≥ 30 Kg/m2).In multivariate analyses, obesity was positively associated with age (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.1; P< 0.001), and with women's education (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7; P = 0.001). Obesity was positively associated with parity in univariate analyses only (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.2; P = 0.02)The high prevalence of obesity in these pregnant women represents a competing public health problem in Sudan. More research is needed.Many developing countries are currently affected by high rates of overweight that in some cases surpass underweight as a public health nutritional problem. Recent reports showed that, in many developing countries e.g. Bangladesh, Nepal, and India, the prevalence of overweight-obesity in women of reproductive age has risen steadily in the last two decades [1]. In the case of Africa, recent analyses of national data on body mass index (BMI) from women showed that, the prevalence of overweight-obesity exceeded that of underweight [2].Increasing BMI is associated with increased incidence of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, macrosomia, induction of labor and caesarean delivery [3]. We have recently observed that, both type of malnutrition (underweight and overweight-obesity) were associated with poor pregnancy outcomes in pregnant Sudanese women [4,5]. Generally few data are available concerning epidemiology of obesity during pregnancy in Sub-Saharan Africa and none available for Sudan the largest African country with 40 million populations. Sudan has traditionally been known as to have the highest rates of poverty -and may be und
Thrombocytopenia in pregnant women with Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria transmission in eastern Sudan
Adam Mayyada B,Adam Gamal K,Rayis Duria A,Elbashir Mustafa I
BMC Clinical Pathology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6890-12-10
Abstract: Background Blood platelet levels are being evaluated as predictive and prognostic indicators of the severity of malaria infections in humans. However, there are few studies on platelets and Plasmodium falciparum malaria during pregnancy. Methods A case–control study was conducted at Gadarif Hospital in Eastern Sudan, an area characterized by unstable malaria transmission. The aim of the study was to investigate thrombocytopenia in pregnant women with P. falciparum malaria (cases) and healthy pregnant women (controls). Results The median (interquartile) platelet counts were significantly lower in patients with malaria (N = 60) than in the controls (N = 60), 61, 000 (43,000–85,000) vs. 249,000 (204,000–300,000)/μL, respectively, p < 0.001. However, there was no significant difference in the platelet counts in patients with severe P. falciparum malaria (N = 12) compared with those patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria (N = 48), 68, 000 (33,000-88,000)/μL vs. 61, 000 (45,000–85,000)/μL, respectively, p = 0.8. While none of the control group had thrombocytopenia (platelet count <75, 000/μL), it was found that 6/12 (50%) and 27/48 (56.2%) (p <0.001) of the patients with severe malaria and uncomplicated malaria had thrombocytopenia, respectively. Pregnant women with P. falciparum malaria, compared with the pregnant healthy control group, were at higher risk (OR = 10.1, 95% CI = 4.1–25.18; p < 0.001) of thrombocytopenia. Two patients experienced bleeding, and there was one maternal death due to cerebral malaria where the patient’s platelet count was only 28,000/μL. Conclusion P. falciparum malaria is associated with thrombocytopenia in pregnant women in this setting. More research is needed.
Neuroblastoma in Saudi Children: A Single Center Experience (2006-2014)  [PDF]
Zaid Al Naqib, Atif A. Ahmed, Musa Al Harbi, Fahad Al Manjomi, Zaheer Ullah Khan, Awatif Alanazi, Othman Mosleh, Walid Ballourah, Mohammed Rayis
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2015.610098
Abstract: Introduction: Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood and survival rate has improved during the last few decades. Only a few studies, related to Neuroblastoma in Saudi Arabian children, have been performed. We report epidemiologic data and our clinical experience from the department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology (PHO), King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Method: A retrospective observational study of all patients, with diagnosis of Neuroblastoma, who attended PHO-KFMC from July 2006 to June 2014 was performed. The survival periods (overall survival and disease-free survival) and the final outcomes for patients treated and followed at KFMC were recorded. The survival data were statistically correlated with the clinical, pathological and biological features of patients and tumors and compared to national and international cohorts. Results: Eight-year data were available for the 42 patients of which 22 (52.4%) were male and 20 (47.6%) were females. Age at diagnosis ranged 0 - 91 months with a mean and median of 26.3 and 18.5 months respectively. 16 (38.1%) patients were under one year and 26 (61.9%) above 1 year of age. The event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5% and 71.5% respectively. EFS and OS among those who were <1 year age at presentation was 75% and 82%, whereas ≥1 yr age group had 59% and 62% survival rates respectively. Patients with tumors in the adrenal had considerably lower EFS (59%) and OS (63%); in comparison to patients with tumors sites other than the adrenal who had EFS and OS of 85% and 89% respectively. Both EFS and OS survival rates at the end of follow-up interval were 100.0%, in the low and intermediate risk groups. In contrast, patients in the high risk group had EFS and OS rates of 44% and 48% respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results are very encouraging and comparable with known published international cohorts, and reveal an excellent outcome for stage 1, 2, 3 & 4 s. The prognosis for advanced (stage 4) disease remains rather poor. A collaborative Saudi-wide effort, with an emphasis on research in detecting clinical and biologic characteristics of aggressive disease and tailoring therapy, is needed.
Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Retrospective 7-Year Experience in Children & Adolescents with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated in King Fahad Medical City (KFMC)  [PDF]
Nahla Ali Mobark, Suha A. Tashkandi, Wafa Al Shakweer, Khalid Al Saidi, Suha A. Fataftah, Mohammed M. Al Nemer, Awatif Alanazi, Mohammed Rayis, Walid Ballourah, Othman Mosleh, Zaheer Ullah, Fahad El Manjomi, Musa Al Harbi
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2015.64033
Abstract:

Background: Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is an aggressive malignant disease in children and adolescents. Although it is the fourth most common malignancy in Saudi children as reported in Saudi cancer registry, less information is available about pediatric Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its outcome in Saudi Arabia. Study Objectives: To provide demographic data, disease characteristics, treatment protocol, toxicity and outcome of treatment in children & adolescents with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma treated at KFMC. This study will form base line for future studies about pediatric Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in KFMC, which may help to improve outcome for children with cancer in Saudi Arabia. Study Patients and Method: We retrospectively analyzed 28 children and adolescents diagnosed to have Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at KFMC between December 2006 and December 2013, followed-up through June 2014. Results: Of the 28 patients, 10 (35.7%) girls and 18 (64.3%) boys, the male-to-female ratio was 1.8; 1. The median age at time of diagnosis was 6.4 years old (range 2.0 to 13.0 years old). The majority of patients (64.3%) were aged between 5 and 12 years old. Burkitt’s lymphoma BL/BLL was the most common pathological subtype (60.7%), and DLBCL was the second most common subtype (21.4%). Abdominal and Retroperitoneal involvement was the most common primary site (78.6%) including the ileocaecal region. Most of the children presented with advanced Stage III and IV (75%), Cytogenetic study which screens specifically for the t (8; 14) (q24; q32) a characteristic genetic feature of Burkitt’s Lymphoma was obtained from 21 patients, variant rearrangement was observed in 3/21 samples and complex chromosomes karyotype in addition to IGH/MYC rearrangement was observed in 2/21 samples. Those patients presented with very aggressive lymphoma and combined BM and CNS involvement. We use the French-American-British Mature B-Cell Lymphoma 96 Protocol (FAB LMB 96) for treatment fornewly diagnosed Mature B-Cell type NHL and high risk ALL CCG 1961 Protocol for lymphoblastic lymphoma and international Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma 99 Study Protocol for ALCL. The median follow-up in patients not experiencing an adverse event was 53.1 months. The estimated 3-year EFE and OS rates in the entire cohort of patients with newly diagnosed NHL treated in the KFMC were 85.2% and 89.2% respectively; Overall survival (OS) rate of patients with mature

PLOJDY ANALYSIS AND DNA CONTENT OF MUTANT BANANA
ABDELGADIR RAYIS SHADIA,ROFINA YASMIN OTHMAN,MAK CHAI
BIOTROPIA : the Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Biology , 2002,
Abstract: Mutagens cause random changes in the nuclear DNA or cytoplasmic organelles, resulting in gene, chromosomal or genomic mutations and hence, create variability. In this study, flow cytometry (FCM) was used to determine ploidy levels and DNA content in gamma-irradiated variants of mutated Pisang Berangan (cv. Intan, AAA) - a local banana genotype. Induced variants such as shor t plant stature (stunted growth), late flowering plants (late maturity) and abnormalities in bunch characters were selected to stud y possible changes at the DNA level. The study showed that DNA content of mutated plants differed from non-irradiated control and that irradiation had the most effect at high doses (40 and 60 Gy). The increase of DNA content in 20 Gy and 30 Gy treated plants was not more than that of the control plants. The values of genomic DNA content of gamma-irra diation variants decreased as the dose of irradiation increased from 20 to 60 Gy, indicating that the high dose of gamma-irradiation had a significant effect on the genome of the plants. The analysis further showed that phenotypic variation due to mutagenesis was reflected in the DNA content of the plants. The results also showed that ploidy levels were not affected by gamma-irradiation even at high doses.
Three-port versus four-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute and chronic cholecystitis
Dhafir Al-Azawi, Nariman Houssein, Abu Rayis, Donal McMahon, Dermot J Hehir
BMC Surgery , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2482-7-8
Abstract: The medical records of 495 patients who underwent LC between September 1999 and September 2003 were reviewed. Variables such as complications, operating time, conversion to open procedure, hospital stay, and analgesia requirements were compared.Two hundred and eighty-three patients underwent three-port LC and 212 patients underwent four-port LC. In total, 163 (32.9%) patients were diagnosed with AC and 332 (67.1%) with CC by histology. There was no statistical difference between the three and four-port groups in terms of complications, conversion to open procedure (p = 0.6), and operating time (p = 0.4). Patients who underwent three-port LC required less opiate analgesia (pethidine) than those who underwent four-port LC (p = 0.0001). The hospital stay was found to be related to the amount of opiates consumed (p = 0.0001) and was significantly shorter in the three-port LC group (p = 0.005).Three-port LC is a safe procedure for AC and CC in expert hands. The procedure offers considerable advantages over the traditional four-port technique in the reduction of analgesia requirements and length of hospital stay.Since its foundation in 1987 by Philip Mouret of Lyon, laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has been the procedure of choice for symptomatic gall bladder disease [1]. Since then, there have been many changes and improvements in the technique. Traditional LC is performed using four-port technique [2,3]. Reducing the size or number of ports did not affect the safety of the procedure and further enhanced the advantages of laparoscopic over open cholecystectomy [4]. These modifications actually reduced the pain and analgesia requirement [5]. Three trocars and even two trocars were used to perform LC [4,6], as has using mini-instruments, authors of these new techniques claimed that these techniques took a similar time to perform and caused less postoperative pain than the standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy [5,7]. Some authors even advised for procedures as needlescope
The Spread of Infectious Disease on Network Using Neutrosophic Algebraic Structure  [PDF]
A. Zubairu, A. A. Ibrahim
Open Journal of Discrete Mathematics (OJDM) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ojdm.2017.72009
Abstract: Network theory and its associated techniques has tremendous impact in various discipline and research, from computer, engineering, architecture, humanities, social science to system biology. However in recent years epidemiology can be said to utilizes these potentials of network theory more than any other discipline. Graph which has been considered as the processor in network theory has a close relationship with epidemiology that dated as far back as early 1900 [1]. This is because the earliest models of infectious disease transfer were in a form of compartment which defines a graph even though adequate knowledge of mathematical computation and mechanistic behavior is scarce. This paper introduces a new type of disease propagation on network utilizing the potentials of neutrosophic algebraic group structures and graph theory.
A Comparative Investigation of Lead Sulfate and Lead Oxide Sulfate Study of Morphology and Thermal Decomposition  [PDF]
S. A. A. Sajadi
American Journal of Analytical Chemistry (AJAC) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ajac.2011.22024
Abstract: The compound lead oxide sulfate PbSO4.PbO was prepared in our laboratory. The Thermal behavior of PbSO4 was studied using techniques of Thermogravimetry under air atmosphere from 25 to 1200°C. The identity of both compounds was confirmed by XRD technique. Results obtained using both techniques support same decomposition stages for this compound. The electron microscopic investigations are made by SEM and TEM. The compound is characterized by XRD and the purity was determined by analytical Methods. Also a series of thermogravimetric analysis is made and the ideal condition is determined to convert this compound to pure lead oxide.
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