oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2015 ( 7 )

2014 ( 8 )

2013 ( 21 )

2012 ( 61 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 245 matches for " Dickstein DP "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /245
Display every page Item
Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers
Siegel RS, Dickstein DP
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S7597
Abstract: nxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers Review (3583) Total Article Views Authors: Siegel RS, Dickstein DP Published Date December 2011 Volume 2012:3 Pages 1 - 16 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AHMT.S7597 Rebecca S Siegel, Daniel P Dickstein Pediatric Mood, Imaging, and NeuroDevelopment Program, EP Bradley Hospital, East Providence, RI, USA Abstract: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact.
Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers
Siegel RS,Dickstein DP
Adolescent Health, Medicine and Therapeutics , 2011,
Abstract: Rebecca S Siegel, Daniel P DicksteinPediatric Mood, Imaging, and NeuroDevelopment Program, EP Bradley Hospital, East Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact.Keywords: anxiety disorders, adolescents, presentation, etiology, assessment, treatment, primary care
ELITE II and Val-HeFT are different trials: together what do they tell us?
Kenneth Dickstein
Trials , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/cvm-2-5-240
Abstract: Despite progress over recent decades in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, heart failure continues to place a significant and increasing burden on patients and healthcare systems worldwide. In the USA alone, an estimated four million to five million people suffer from chronic heart failure, where it has an estimated five-year mortality rate of 50% and is the leading cause of hospitalisation in age groups 65 years and older [1,2].Typically, a patient with heart failure has reduced cardiac output, elevated filling pressures, and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Heart failure is not a homogenous disease process, however, and this makes the study of heart failure potentially complex, and makes the comparison between different patient cohorts in different clinical trials difficult.Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the treatment of choice in heart failure, with proven ability to reduce morbidity and mortality [3]. More recently, however, reporting of data from large-scale clinical trials has focused attention on the potential role of angiotensin II antagonists. Two such trials – the Losartan Heart Failure Survival Study (ELITE II) and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (Val-HeFT) – are reviewed below.Both ELITE II [4] and Val-HeFT [5] evaluated the efficacy of a selective angiotensin II receptor antagonist on morbidity and mortality in patients with symptomatic heart failure. There are essential differences however, in the design of these trials that must be taken into consideration when comparing these two studies and interpreting the clinical impact of the results. The bottom line, as detailed in this communication, is that the trials address very different hypotheses and provide complementary but different types of information; too much comparison is simply inappropriate.The questions addressed reflect the most essential differences between the two trials. The primary hypothesis in the ELITE II study was that losartan would
REVIEW PAPER: Hints and tricks in the scientific publication
Kenneth Dickstein
Archives of Medical Science , 2005,
Abstract:
TENS to the Lateral Aspect of the Knees During Stance Attenuates Postural Sway in Young Adults
Yocheved Laufer,Ruth Dickstein
The Scientific World Journal , 2007, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2007.279
Abstract:
Efficient Methods for Unsupervised Learning of Probabilistic Models
Jascha Sohl-Dickstein
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: In this thesis I develop a variety of techniques to train, evaluate, and sample from intractable and high dimensional probabilistic models. Abstract exceeds arXiv space limitations -- see PDF.
The Natural Gradient by Analogy to Signal Whitening, and Recipes and Tricks for its Use
Jascha Sohl-Dickstein
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: The natural gradient allows for more efficient gradient descent by removing dependencies and biases inherent in a function's parameterization. Several papers present the topic thoroughly and precisely. It remains a very difficult idea to get your head around however. The intent of this note is to provide simple intuition for the natural gradient and its use. We review how an ill conditioned parameter space can undermine learning, introduce the natural gradient by analogy to the more widely understood concept of signal whitening, and present tricks and specific prescriptions for applying the natural gradient to learning problems.
Hamiltonian Monte Carlo with Reduced Momentum Flips
Jascha Sohl-Dickstein
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (or hybrid Monte Carlo) with partial momentum refreshment explores the state space more slowly than it otherwise would due to the momentum reversals which occur on proposal rejection. These cause trajectories to double back on themselves, leading to random walk behavior on timescales longer than the typical rejection time, and leading to slower mixing. I present a technique by which the number of momentum reversals can be reduced. This is accomplished by maintaining the net exchange of probability between states with opposite momenta, but reducing the rate of exchange in both directions such that it is 0 in one direction. An experiment illustrates these reduced momentum flips accelerating mixing for a particular distribution.
Dominant curly coat in horses
DP Sponenberg
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1990, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-22-2-257
Abstract:
DNA repair and breast cancer: therapeutic opportunities
DP Silver
Breast Cancer Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/bcr3008
Abstract: Laboratory-based studies of BRCA1 and BRCA2 demonstrated that loss of function of either gene resulted in significantly increased susceptibility to certain forms of chemotherapy, including interstrand DNA cross-linking agents such as the platinum drugs and mitomycin C. More recently, loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 function has also been shown to increase sensitivity to PARP inhibition, a finding made possible as a result of increased understanding of the DNA repair implications of BRCA1 or BRCA2 loss. To a large extent, these laboratory-based observations have now been verified in clinical trials enrolling patients with hereditary breast cancer. The implications of the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2 for treatment options in sporadic breast cancer are more complex. Based on a series of striking phenotypic similarities between the majority of sporadic triple-negative breast cancers and most cancers that arise in BRCA1 heterozygotes, the hypothesis arose that perhaps many of these sporadic cancers might also share a similar lesion in DNA repair (BRCAness) with the BRCA1-related tumors. This notion has now been put to the test in ongoing clinical trials that treat sporadic triple-negative breast cancer patients with platinum agents, PARP inhibitors, or combinations. The current evidence for and against this hypothesis will be discussed.
Page 1 /245
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.