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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 371292 matches for " David S. Riley "
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Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study
Harald J. Hamre,Anja Glockmann,Michael Fischer,David S. Riley
Drug Target Insights , 2007,
Abstract: Objective: Anthroposophic medications (AMED) are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections.Methods: A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged 1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED.Results: Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1) swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2) sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327) of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715) of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443) of applications.Conclusion: In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated.Abbreviations: A-: anthroposophy; ADR: adverse drug reactions; AE: adverse events; AM: anthroposophic medicine; AMED: AM medication; C-: conventional; ENE-patients: eligible, not enrolled patients; IIPCOS: International Primary Care Outcomes Study
Identifying defect-tolerant semiconductors with high minority carrier lifetimes: Beyond hybrid lead halide perovskites
Riley E. Brandt,Vladan Stevanovi?,David S. Ginley,Tonio Buonassisi
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1557/mrc.2015.26
Abstract: The emergence of methyl-ammonium lead halide (MAPbX3) perovskites motivates the identification of unique properties giving rise to exceptional bulk transport properties, and identifying future materials with similar properties. Here, we propose that this "defect tolerance" emerges from fundamental electronic structure properties, including the orbital character of the conduction and valence band extrema, the effective masses, and the static dielectric constant. We use MaterialsProject.org searches and detailed electronic-structure calculations to demonstrate these properties in other materials than MAPbX3. This framework of materials discovery may be applied more broadly, to accelerate discovery of new semiconductors based on emerging understanding of recent successes.
Simulation modelling: educational development roles for learning technologists
David Riley
Research in Learning Technology , 2002, DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v10i3.11410
Abstract: Simulation modelling was in the mainstream of CAL development in the 1980s when the late David Squires introduced this author to the Dynamic Modelling System. Since those early days, it seems that simulation modelling has drifted into a learning technology backwater to become a member of Laurillard's underutilized, 'adaptive and productive' media. Referring to her Conversational Framework, Laurillard constructs a pedagogic case for modelling as a productive student activity but provides few references to current practice and available resources. This paper seeks to complement her account by highlighting the pioneering initiatives of the Computers in the Curriculum Project and more recent developments in systems modelling within geographic and business education. The latter include improvements to system dynamics modelling programs such as STELLA , the publication of introductory textbooks, and the emergence of online resources. The paper indicates several ways in which modelling activities may be approached and identifies some educational development roles for learning technologists. The paper concludes by advocating simulation modelling as an exemplary use of learning technologies - one that realizes their creative-transformative potential.
Educational innovation, learning technologies and Virtual culture potential'
David Riley
Research in Learning Technology , 2002, DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v10i1.11300
Abstract: Learning technologies are regularly associated with innovative teaching but will they contribute to profound innovations in education itself? This paper addresses the question by building upon Merlin.Donald's co-evolutionary theory of mind, cognition and culture. He claimed that the invention of technologies for storing and sharing external symbol systems, such as writing, gave rise to a 'theoretic culture' with rich symbolic representations and a resultant need for formal education. More recently, Shaffer and Kaput have claimed that the development of external and shared symbol-processing technologies is giving rise to an emerging 'virtual culture'. They argue that mathematics curricula are grounded in theoretic culture and should change to meet the novel demands of 'virtual culture' for symbol-processing and representational fluency. The generic character of their cultural claim is noted in this paper and it is suggested that equivalent pedagogic arguments are applicable across the educational spectrum. Hence, four general characteristics of virtual culture are proposed, against which applications of learning technologies can be evaluated for their innovative potential. Two illustrative uses of learning technologies are evaluated in terms of their 'virtual culture potential' and some anticipated questions about this approach are discussed towards the end of the paper.
Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study
Harald J. Hamre, Anja Glockmann, Michael Fischer, David S. Riley, Erik Baars and Helmut Kiene
Drug Target Insights , 2012,
Abstract: Objective: Anthroposophic medications (AMED) are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections. Methods: A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged 1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED. Results: Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1) swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2) sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327) of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715) of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443) of applications. Conclusion: In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated. Abbreviations: A-: anthroposophy; ADR: adverse drug reactions; AE: adverse events; AM: anthroposophic medicine; AMED: AM medication; C-: conventional; ENE-patients: eligible, not enrolled patients; IIPCOS: International Primary Care Outcomes Study
MP470, a novel receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with Erlotinib inhibits the HER family/PI3K/Akt pathway and tumor growth in prostate cancer
Wenqing Qi, Larry S Cooke, Amy Stejskal, Christopher Riley, Kimiko Croce, Jose W Saldanha, David Bearss, Daruka Mahadevan
BMC Cancer , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-9-142
Abstract: The efficacy of MP470 or MP470 plus Erlotinib was evaluated in vitro using three prostate cancer cell lines by MTS and apoptosis assays. The molecular mechanism study was carried out by phosphorylation antibody array, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. A LNCaP mouse xenograft model was also used to determine the tumor growth inhibition by MP470, Erlotinib or the combination treatments.MP470 exhibits low μM IC50 in prostate cancer cell lines. Additive effects on both cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis were observed when LNCaP were treated with MP470 in combination with Erlotinib. This combination treatment completely inhibited phosphorylation of the HER family members (HER1, 2, 3), binding of PI3K regulatory unit p85 to HER3 and downstream Akt activity even after androgen depletion. Furthermore, in a LNCaP mouse xenograft model, the MP470-Erlotinib combination produced 30–65% dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition (TGI).We propose that MP470-Erlotinib targets the HER family/PI3K/Akt pathway and may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer.Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in men, with an estimated 218,890 new patients and 27,050 deaths in the US in 2007 [1]. Utilization of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a surrogate biomarker results in earlier diagnosis of the disease [2]. Localized disease can be cured with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy [3]. However, patients with advanced or bulky local disease are at increased risk of treatment failure following local therapy [4]. Most patients remain largely asymptomatic until the development of overt metastatic disease. The current gold standard in men with newly diagnosed metastatic disease is androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) [5] which decreases the volume of the primary and metastatic lesions by inducing apoptosis [6]. In most cases, after an initial response, tumors recur as hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) and are unresponsive to additional an
Emergency department diagnosis of a quadriceps intramuscular loculated abscess/pyomyositis using dynamic compression bedside ultrasonography
Aleksandr Tichter, David C Riley
Critical Ultrasound Journal , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/2036-7902-5-3
Abstract: Bedside dynamic compression ultrasonography can assist the emergency or critical care physician in the diagnosis of quadriceps intramuscular abscess or pyomyositis.
Filling Length in Finitely Presentable Groups
S. Gersten,T. Riley
Mathematics , 2000,
Abstract: Filling length measures the length of the contracting closed loops in a null-homotopy. The filling length function of Gromov for a finitely presented group measures the filling length as a function of length of edge-loops in the Cayley 2-complex. We give a bound on the filling length function in terms of the log of an isoperimetric function multiplied by a (simultaneously realisable) isodiametric function.
Homeopathic and conventional treatment for acute respiratory and ear complaints: A comparative study on outcome in the primary care setting
Max Haidvogl, David S Riley, Marianne Heger, Sara Brien, Miek Jong, Michael Fischer, George T Lewith, Gerard Jansen, André E Thurneysen
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-7-7
Abstract: The study was designed as an international, multi-centre, comparative cohort study of non-randomised design. Patients, presenting themselves with at least one chief complaint: acute (≤ 7 days) runny nose, sore throat, ear pain, sinus pain or cough, were recruited at 57 primary care practices in Austria (8), Germany (8), the Netherlands (7), Russia (6), Spain (6), Ukraine (4), United Kingdom (10) and the USA (8) and given either homeopathic or conventional treatment. Therapy outcome was measured by using the response rate, defined as the proportion of patients experiencing 'complete recovery' or 'major improvement' in each treatment group. The primary outcome criterion was the response rate after 14 days of therapy.Data of 1,577 patients were evaluated in the full analysis set of which 857 received homeopathic (H) and 720 conventional (C) treatment. The majority of patients in both groups reported their outcome after 14 days of treatment as complete recovery or major improvement (H: 86.9%; C: 86.0%; p = 0.0003 for non-inferiority testing). In the per-protocol set (H: 576 and C: 540 patients) similar results were obtained (H: 87.7%; C: 86.9%; p = 0.0019). Further subgroup analysis of the full analysis set showed no differences of response rates after 14 days in children (H: 88.5%; C: 84.5%) and adults (H: 85.6%; C: 86.6%). The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of the primary outcome criterion was 1.40 (0.89–2.22) in children and 0.92 (0.63–1.34) in adults. Adjustments for demographic differences at baseline did not significantly alter the OR. The response rates after 7 and 28 days also showed no significant differences between both treatment groups. However, onset of improvement within the first 7 days after treatment was significantly faster upon homeopathic treatment both in children (p = 0.0488) and adults (p = 0.0001). Adverse drug reactions occurred more frequently in adults of the conventional group than in the homeopathic group (C: 7.6%; H: 3.1%, p = 0.0032), whereas
Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI
David M. L. Lilburn, Theodore Hughes-Riley, Joseph S. Six, Karl F. Stupic, Dominick E. Shaw, Galina E. Pavlovskaya, Thomas Meersmann
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073468
Abstract: Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies.
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