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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10913 matches for " Darwin Mayorga Cruz "
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Recurrence Quantification Analysis of Rough Surfaces Applied to Optical and Speckle Profiles  [PDF]
Oscar Sarmiento Martinez, Darwin Mayorga Cruz, Jorge Uruchurtu Chavarín, Estela Sarmiento Bustos
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2016.44083
Abstract: In this paper, Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) is set as a practical nonlinear data tool to establish and compare surface roughness (Ra) through percentage parameters of a dynamical system: Recurrence (%REC), Determinism (%DET) and Laminarity (%LAM). Variations in surface roughness of different machining procedures from a typical metallic casting comparator are obtained from scattering intensity of a laser beam and expressed as changes in the statistics of speckle patterns and profiles optical properties. The application of the analysis (RQA) by Recurrence Plots (RPs), allowed to distinguish between machining procedures, highlighting features that other methods are unable to detect.
Una nueva lectura del antiguo convento de Santa Clara de Asís desde la arqueología y la historiografía
Arduengo García,Darwin A.; Cruz Pérez,Alejandro;
Arquitectura y Urbanismo , 2012,
Abstract: this paper provides a new view of the history of the ancient saint claire of assisi monastery located in old havana, headquarters of the national center for conservation, restoration and museology (cencrem). the main goal of the research is to explain the historical evolution of the convent through the technological and constructive changes that took place in the building.the information collected until now has enhanced the knowledge about the history of the building in a more accurate way than historiography could do.
Reporte inicial de las investigaciones arqueológicas en el tercer claustro del antiguo convento de Santa Clara de Asís
Darwin A. Arduengo García,Alejandro Cruz Pérez
Cuba Arqueológica : Revista Digital de Arqueología de Cuba y el Caribe , 2010,
Abstract: Este trabajo propone una nueva lectura del tercer claustro del edificio del antiguo convento de Santa Clara de Asís de la Habana Vieja, sede del Centro Nacional de Conservación, Restauración y Museología (CENCREM). Los antecedentes de los que se parte críticamente son la importante investigación publicada por el historiador Pedro Herrera (2006), así como los reportes de las investigaciones arqueológicas llevadas a cabo en las áreas del edificio durante unos cincuenta a os. Durante los últimos cinco a os las investigaciones fundamentales realizadas por el grupo de arqueología del CENCREM en lo tocante al proyecto investigativo general del convento han estado dedicadas a las instalaciones hidráulicas del primer claustro y a los cambios constructivos del tercer claustro. Como consecuencia de las investigaciones en el tercer claustro se ha identificado una capilla no reportada en la bibliografía o en fuentes documentales
An Ethical Approach to the Concept of Toleration: Understanding Tolerance as a Political Virtue  [PDF]
Ivón Cepeda Mayorga
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2014.44059
Abstract: The concept of toleration is commonly argued in political discourses and debates, when people refer to diversity and pluralism, as a form of respect and understanding. However, this does not represent an improvement at the moment of dealing with issues where a variety of values, conceptions and beliefs arises. In addition, even though when the idea of toleration was developed during Enlightenment, nowadays it seems to lead to a misconception of the term, following a connotation of a passive indifference about diversity. Due to this, the main objective of this text is to analyze the concept of toleration from an ethical perspective that allows thinking about it in terms of a political virtue needed to face the challenges of diversity inside society. In order to show this, the text presents an analysis of different conceptions of the term, in order to highlight the positive notion of toleration; after that, the text moves on, reviewing the idea of toleration from a hermeneutical perspective, as a form to reinforce the positive characteristics of the term, and path to solve the query between tolerance and intolerance. Finally, as a conclusion, it underlines that understanding the concept of toleration from an ethical perspective implies a praxis develop in daily circumstances.
Comparison of bioassays using the anostracan crustaceans Artemia salina and Thamnocephalus platyurus for plant extract toxicity screening
Mayorga, Pablo;Pérez, Karen R.;Cruz, Sully M.;Cáceres, Armando;
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-695X2010005000029
Abstract: three lethality bioassays, using the salt-water crustacean artemia salina leach, artemiidae, (conventional 96 microwell plate test and the artoxkit m microbiotest) and the freshwater crustacean thamnocephalus platyurus packard, thamnocephalidae, (thamnotoxkit f microbiotest), were compared using extracts of ten guatemalan plant species. it was previously observed that five of them have anti-artemia activity. these were: solanum americanum mill., solanaceae, gliricidia sepium (jacq.) kunth ex walp., fabaceae, neurolaena lobata (l.) cass., asteraceae, petiveria alliacea l., phytolaccaceae, and ocimum campechianum mill., lamiaceae. the five others: curatella americana l., dilleniaceae, prunus barbata koehne, rosaceae, quercus crispifolia trel., fagaceae, rhizophora mangle l., rhizophoraceae, and smilax domingensis willd., smilacaceae, do not. all plants without anti-artemia activity had no lethal effects in both assays with a. salina. for the plants with anti-artemia activity the artoxkit m was not sensitive to g. sepium and the conventional artemia test was not sensitive to s. americanum, g. sepium and n. lobata. all the plant extracts, except for that of c. americana, had lethal effects on t. platyurus and the lethal median concentration (lc50) levels for this organism were in all cases substantially lower than those of the salt-water test species. this study revealed that t. platyurus is a promising test species worth further in depth investigation for toxicity screening of plant extracts with potential medicinal properties.
Comparison of bioassays using the anostracan crustaceans Artemia salina and Thamnocephalus platyurus for plant extract toxicity screening Compara o de bioensaios com os crustáceos Artemia salina e Thamnocephalus platyurus para abordagem de extratos de plantas com toxicidade
Pablo Mayorga,Karen R. Pérez,Sully M. Cruz,Armando Cáceres
Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia , 2010,
Abstract: Three lethality bioassays, using the salt-water crustacean Artemia salina Leach, Artemiidae, (conventional 96 microwell plate test and the Artoxkit M microbiotest) and the freshwater crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus Packard, Thamnocephalidae, (Thamnotoxkit F microbiotest), were compared using extracts of ten Guatemalan plant species. It was previously observed that five of them have anti-Artemia activity. These were: Solanum americanum Mill., Solanaceae, Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Kunth ex Walp., Fabaceae, Neurolaena lobata (L.) Cass., Asteraceae, Petiveria alliacea L., Phytolaccaceae, and Ocimum campechianum Mill., Lamiaceae. The five others: Curatella americana L., Dilleniaceae, Prunus barbata Koehne, Rosaceae, Quercus crispifolia Trel., Fagaceae, Rhizophora mangle L., Rhizophoraceae, and Smilax domingensis Willd., Smilacaceae, do not. All plants without anti-Artemia activity had no lethal effects in both assays with A. salina. For the plants with anti-Artemia activity the Artoxkit M was not sensitive to G. sepium and the conventional Artemia test was not sensitive to S. americanum, G. sepium and N. lobata. All the plant extracts, except for that of C. americana, had lethal effects on T. platyurus and the lethal median concentration (LC50) levels for this organism were in all cases substantially lower than those of the salt-water test species. This study revealed that T. platyurus is a promising test species worth further in depth investigation for toxicity screening of plant extracts with potential medicinal properties. Três bioensaios de letalidade com o crustáceo de água salgada Artemia salina Leach, Artemiidae, (teste convencional em microplaca de 96 poós Artoxkit microbiotest M) e o crustáceo de água doce Thamnocephalus platyurus Packard, Thamnocephalidae (Thamnotoxkit microbiotest F), foram comparados utilizando extratos de dez espécies de plantas da Guatemala. Foi previamente observado que cinco delas possuem atividade anti-Artemia: Solanum americanum Mill., Solanaceae, Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Kunth ex Walp., Fabaceae, Neurolaena lobata (L.) Cass., Asteraceae, Petiveria alliacea L., Phytolaccaceae e Ocimum campechianum Mill., Lamiaceae. As outras cinco espécies, Curatella americana L., Dilleniaceae, Prunus barbata Koehne, Rosaceae, Quercus crispifolia Trel., Fagaceae, Rhizophora mangle L., Rhizophoraceae e Smilax domingensis Willd., Smilacaceae, n o. Todas as plantas sem atividade anti-Artemia n o tiveram nenhum efeito letal em ambos os ensaios com A. salina. Para as plantas com atividade anti-Artemia o M Artoxkit n o foi sensível a G. sepi
Hydraulic Reliability Assessment and Optimal Rehabilitation/Upgrading Schedule for Water Distribution Systems  [PDF]
Wei Peng, Rene V. Mayorga
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/am.2016.718184
Abstract: This paper develops an innovative approach to optimize a long-term rehabilitation and upgrading schedule (RUS) for a water distribution system with considering both hydraulic failure and mechanical performance failure circumstances. The proposed approach assesses hydraulic reliability dynamically and then optimizes the long-term RUS in sequence for a water distribution system. The uncertain hydraulic parameters are treated as random numbers in a stochastic hydraulic reliability assessment. The methodologies used for optimization in a stochastic environment are: Monte Carlo Simulation, EPANET Simulation, Genetic Algorithms, Shamir and Howard’s Exponential Model, Threshold Break Rate Model and Two-Stage Optimization Model. The proposed approach is conducted on a simulation model of water distribution network in a computer by two universal codes, namely the hydraulic reliability code and the optimal RUS code. The applicability of this approach is verified in an example of a benchmark water distribution network.
AnnaBot: A Static Verifier for Java Annotation Usage
Ian Darwin
Advances in Software Engineering , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/540547
Abstract: This paper describes AnnaBot, one of the first tools to verify correct use of Annotation-based metadata in the Java programming language. These Annotations are a standard Java 5 mechanism used to attach metadata to types, methods, or fields without using an external configuration file. A binary representation of the Annotation becomes part of the compiled “.class” file, for inspection by another component or library at runtime. Java Annotations were introduced into the Java language in 2004 and have become widely used in recent years due to their introduction in the Java Enterprise Edition 5, the Hibernate object-relational mapping API, the Spring Framework, and elsewhere. Despite that, mainstream development tools have not yet produced a widely-used verification tool to confirm correct configuration and placement of annotations external to the particular runtime component. While most of the examples in this paper use the Java Persistence API, AnnaBot is capable of verifying anyannotation-based API for which “claims”—description of annotation usage—are available. These claims can be written in Java or using a proposed Domain-Specific Language, which has been designed and a parser (but not the code generator) have been written. 1. Introduction 1.1. Java Annotations Java Annotations were introduced into the language in 2004 [1] and have become widely used in recent years, especially since their introduction in the Java Enterprise Edition. Many open source projects including the Spring [2] and Seam [1] Frameworks, and the Hibernate and Toplink ORMs use annotations. So do many new Sun Java standards, including the Java Standard Edition, the Java Persistence API (an Object Relational Mapping API), the EJB container, and the Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS). Until now there has not been a general-purpose tool for independently verifying correct use of these annotations. The syntax of Java Annotations is slightly unusual—while they are given class-style names (names begin with a capital letter by convention) and are stored in binary .class files, they may not be instantiated using the new operator. Instead, they are placed by themselves in the source code, preceding the element that is to be annotated (see Figure 1). Annotations may be compile-time or run-time; the latter’s binary representation becomes part of the compiled “class” file, for inspection by another component at run time. Annotations are used by preceding their name with the “at” sign (@). For example, here is a class with both a compiletime annotation and a runtime annotation Figure 1:
On the nature of man and disaster
Mike Darwin
Critical Care , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/cc3937
Abstract: There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And we must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures.William Shakespeare"Julius Caesar"Human response to risk can be either proactive or reactive. Proactive measures include avoiding known risks by not settling in or venturing into hazardous environments, and mitigating them by constructing dams, levees, and other protective infrastructure. Proactive mitigation also includes creating disaster warning systems, infrastructure to facilitate rapid evacuation, and emergency shelters in advance of need. Proactive measures are necessarily costly because they both consume and sequester resources for an indefinite period of time. This cost is particularly psychologically burdensome because it is impossible to predict with any certainty precisely when a threat will become a crisis or a disaster.In contrast, reactive measures are much less expensive in the short term. Delivering emergency food, water, shelter, medical care, and post-disaster evacuation have the theoretical advantage of being deployable anywhere, ideally from just a few locations. The appeal of post-disaster response is that the overhead is low and the resources can be used reliably on a regular basis. Unfortunately, what is not factored into this approach is the vastly more expensive loss of property and lives that proactive mitigation would have prevented. The reasons for disasters such as Hurricane Katrina can only be understood by inquiring into the nature of technology and the human minds that wield it.There is an anthropologic perspective on the evolution of technology. One way to look at this progression is in terms of timescales. To begin, the 'trivial timescale' is bounded by day-to-day activities such as bathing, unstructured socializing, and going to work. Humans, and presumably most other v
How to Observe the Interference Effects of Top quark polarizations at Tevatron
Darwin Chang
Physics , 1996,
Abstract: Using a simple analytic expression for $q \bar{q}, g g \rightarrow t \bar{t} \rightarrow b W^+ \bar{b} W^- \rightarrow b \bar{l} \nu_l \bar{b} l' \bar{\nu_{l'}}$ with the interference effects due to the polarizations of the $t$ and $\bar{t}$, we demonstrate how the effects can be measured at Tevatron at $3\sigma$ level.
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