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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 19770 matches for " Danusa Dias;Silami-Garcia "
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Evaluation of hydration status following soccer matches of different categories
Coelho, Daniel Barbosa;Pereira, Emerson Rodrigues;Gomes, Elisa Couto;Coelho, Leonardo;Soares, Danusa Dias;Silami-Garcia, Emerson;
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano , 2012, DOI: 10.5007//1980-0037.2012v14n3p276
Abstract: the purpose of this study was to evaluate the hydration status and thermoregulatory responses, during official soccer matches, of soccer players in different categories. the participants of the under-15 (u-15, n=36) and of the under-17 category (u-17, n=14) were placed into different groups according to the amount of time spent in the field: main group; partial group; intermediate group; control group. the thermoregulatory responses and hydration status were measured. the main group and the partial group presented significantly higher water intake, weight loss and sweat rate compared with the intermediate and control group (p< 0.05). the under-17 players of the main group had a larger weight difference pre and post match compared with the under-15 players of the same group (p< 0.05). it was concluded that an official soccer match altered significantly the hydration status of the players, and it was related with the time spent in the match.
Effect of player substitutions on the intensity of second-half soccer match play
Coelho, Daniel Barbosa;Coelho, Leonardo Gomes Martins;Morandi, Rodrigo Figueiredo;Ferreira Junior, Jo?o Batista;Marins, Jo?o Carlos Bouzas;Prado, Luciano Sales;Soares, Danusa Dias;Silami-Garcia, Emerson;
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano , 2012, DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n2p183
Abstract: most soccer matches are conducted by coaches who usually make all player substitutions allowed. therefore, it is extremely important to study these substitutions and their effects on the intensity of effort required from players. to date, no published studies have reported on this topic using heart rate (hr) as an intensity parameter. the objective of this study was to compare effort intensity (ei) of soccer players in the following situations: 1) first half (fh-ei); 2) second half (sh-ei); 3) second half with substitutions (shs-ei). forty-five male soccer players (18.5±1.2 years old, 74.25±5.79 kg, 182.6±8.55 cm, 9.56±2.47% body fat, 56.3±4.3 mlo2/kg/min) were evaluated during 29 official games. ei was considered as the mean hr, expressed as the percentage of each player's maximal hr (%hrmax) and as the time spent in each intensity zone (z) according to %hrmax (z1<70%; z2 70-85%; z3 85-90%; z4 90-95%; z5 95-100%). fh-ei (86.3±3.3%hrmax) was higher than sh-ei (80.6±4.4%hrmax) and shs-ei (83.6±2.8%hrmax). shs-ei was higher than sh-ei (p<0.05). time spent in high-intensity zones was lower in sh-ei than in fh-ei, but higher in shs-ei when compared to sh-ei (p<0.05). it was concluded that the decrease in ei in the second half of soccer matches was attenuated by substitutions made at halftime, as evidenced by a longer time spent in high-intensity zones when compared to sh-ei.
Compara??o entre a intensidade do esfor?o realizada por jovens futebolistas no primeiro e no segundo tempo do jogo de Futebol
Mortimer,Lucas; Condessa,Luciano; Rodrigues,Vinícius; Coelho,Daniel; Soares,Danusa; Silami-Garcia,Emerson;
Revista Portuguesa de Ciências do Desporto , 2006,
Abstract: objective: compare the effort intensity (ie) of young soccer players between the first and second halves of official games. methods: 25 athletes were evaluated (17,5 ± 1,2 years; 8,5 ± 1,0% of body fat; 175,1 ± 6,8 cm; 69,3 ± 5,2 kg and vo2máx of 52,2 ± 3,3 mlo2?kg-1?min-1) who pertained to a club of the first division of the brazilian soccer. heart rate (hr) of the athletes was measured using a set of heart rate monitors, during official games, being 14 games of the under-17 category (u-17) and 8 games of the under-20 category (u-20). the maximal heart rate (mhr) for each athlete was considered as the highest hr observed during two maximal effort tests (race of 1000m and 2400m). in the cases which a higher value of hr was observed during game situations in relation to the tests, this was considered the mhr. results were analyzed using student t test and the accepted level of significance was p<0,05. results: there was a significant difference (p<0,01) between the average hr and the percentage of maximal heart rate (%mhr) between first half (170 ± 8 bpm and 85,2 ± 4,5%mhr) and second half (166 ± 10 bpm e 82,7 ± 4,6%mhr). these results show a lower effort intensity in the second half of the game, in comparison with the first half.
Assessment of functional capacity through oxygen consumption in patients with asymptomatic probable heart disease
Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro;Silami-Garcia, Emerson;Moreira, Maria da Consola??o Vieira;Ribeiro, Giane Amorim;
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0066-782X1999000700001
Abstract: purpose: to compare peak exercise oxygen consumption (vo2peak) of healthy individuals with asymptomatic individuals with probable heart disease. methods: ninety-eight men were evaluated. they were divided into two groups: 1) 39 healthy individuals (group n) with an age range of 50±4.6 years; and 2) 59 asymptomatic individuals with signs of atherosclerotic and/or hypertensive heart disease (group c) with an age range of 51.9±10.4 years. in regard to age, height, body surface area, percentage of fat, lean body mass, and daily physical activity, both groups were statistically similar. environmental conditions during the ergometric test were also controlled. results: maximal aerobic power (watts), vo2peak, maximal heart rate, and maximal pulmonary ventilation were lower in group c (p<0.01) than in group n; weight, however, was lower in group n (p=0.031) than in group c. differences in the respiratory gas exchange index, heart rate at rest, and the maximal double product of the two groups were not statistically significant. conclusion: signs of probable heart disease, even though asymptomatic, may reduce the functional capacity, perhaps due to the lower maximal cardiac output and/or muscle metabolic changes.
Cinética da creatina quinase em jogadores de futebol profissional em uma temporada competitiva
Coelho, Daniel Barbosa;Morandi, Rodrigo Figueiredo;Melo, Marco Aurélio Anuncia??o de;Silami-Garcia, Emerson;
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano , 2011, DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n3p189
Abstract: serum creatine kinase (ck) concentration has been widely used as an indicator of skeletal muscle damage in sports. however, there are no studies on post-game ck kinetics in soccer during a competitive season. the aim of this study was to evaluate serum ck kinetics in professional soccer players at different post-game times during a competitive season without training interruption. seventeen professional soccer players (age: 22.2±3.1 years, height: 179±6.0 cm, body fat percentage: 9.5±1.1, and 67.0±3.5 ml o2/kg/min) were evaluated over a period of 3 months of the national championship. serum ck concentration was measured before the beginning of the season (baseline) and at four different times after a soccer game (post-1: 12-20 h, post-2: 36-48 h, post-3: 60-65 h, and post-4: 90-110 h). plasma ck concentrations were higher at all times when compared to baseline (p<0.05). post-2 ck concentration was lower than post-1 and higher than post-3 and -4 (p<0.05), with no significant differences between post-3 and post-4. in conclusion, serum ck kinetics was influenced by the training routine of the soccer players, with a peak between 12 and 20 h after the game, returning to normal within 60-65 h. this procedure can be used to monitor the recovery state of athletes and game and training intensities.
Hidrata??o durante o exercício: a sede é suficiente?
Machado-Moreira, Christiano Ant?nio;Vimieiro-Gomes, Ana Carolina;Silami-Garcia, Emerson;Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro;
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S1517-86922006000600020
Abstract: the present work proposes a review about exercise fluid replacement and a discussion whether, during exercise, the fluid ingested according to thirst is sufficient to maintain hydration. exercise sweat loss, mainly in the heat, can cause dehydration, can alter the hidroelectrolyte balance, disturb thermoregulation, presenting a health risk and/or impairing the athletic performance. it has been asserted that athletes do not drink, spontaneously, the sufficient fluid volume to prevent dehydration during the physical activity. thus, international recommendations to fluid replacement during physical activities have been proposed. according to the american college of sports medicine (acsm), about 500 ml of fluid on the two hours before the exercise must be ingested. during exercise, they propose that athletes should start fluid replacement since the beginning in regular periods and should drink enough fluid to restore all the sweating losses or ingest the maximal volume tolerated. the national athletic trainer's association (nata) proposes the following recommendations: ingestion of 500 to 600 ml of water two or three hours before exercise or other sport drink and ingestion of 200 to 300 ml 10 to 20 minutes before exercise starting. during exercise, the fluid replacement should match the sweating and urine losses and at least should maintain hydration status reaching maximal body weight losses of 2%. after the exercise, fluid replacement must restore all the fluid losses accumulated. in addition, acsm and nata asserted about fluid temperature and palatability, beverage carbohydrate and electrolyte additions according to exercise duration and intensity and recommended hydration schedules to provide easier access to fluid ingestion. however, other authors contest the use of hydration schedules based on predetermined fluid volumes and suggest that fluid replacement according to thirst is enough to maintain body homeostasis.
Assessment of functional capacity through oxygen consumption in patients with asymptomatic probable heart disease
Rodrigues Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro,Silami-Garcia Emerson,Moreira Maria da Consola??o Vieira,Ribeiro Giane Amorim
Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia , 1999,
Abstract: PURPOSE: To compare peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO2peak) of healthy individuals with asymptomatic individuals with probable heart disease. METHODS: Ninety-eight men were evaluated. They were divided into two groups: 1) 39 healthy individuals (group N) with an age range of 50±4.6 years; and 2) 59 asymptomatic individuals with signs of atherosclerotic and/or hypertensive heart disease (group C) with an age range of 51.9±10.4 years. In regard to age, height, body surface area, percentage of fat, lean body mass, and daily physical activity, both groups were statistically similar. Environmental conditions during the ergometric test were also controlled. RESULTS: Maximal aerobic power (watts), VO2peak, maximal heart rate, and maximal pulmonary ventilation were lower in group C (p<0.01) than in group N; weight, however, was lower in group N (p=0.031) than in group C. Differences in the respiratory gas exchange index, heart rate at rest, and the maximal double product of the two groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Signs of probable heart disease, even though asymptomatic, may reduce the functional capacity, perhaps due to the lower maximal cardiac output and/or muscle metabolic changes.
Thermoregulation in hypertensive men exercising in the heat with water ingestion
Ribeiro G.A.,Rodrigues L.O.C.,Moreira M.C.V.,Silami-Garcia E.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2004,
Abstract: Hydration is recommended in order to decrease the overload on the cardiovascular system when healthy individuals exercise, mainly in the heat. To date, no criteria have been established for hydration for hypertensive (HY) individuals during exercise in a hot environment. Eight male HY volunteers without another medical problem and 8 normal (NO) subjects (46 ± 3 and 48 ± 1 years; 78.8 ± 2.5 and 79.5 ± 2.8 kg; 171 ± 2 and 167 ± 1 cm; body mass index = 26.8 ± 0.7 and 28.5 ± 0.6 kg/m2; resting systolic (SBP) = 142.5 and 112.5 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 97.5 and 78.1 mmHg, respectively) exercised for 60 min on a cycle ergometer (40% of VO2peak) with (500 ml 2 h before and 115 ml every 15 min throughout exercise) or without water ingestion, in a hot humid environment (30oC and 85% humidity). Rectal (Tre) and skin (Tsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), SBP, DBP, double product (DP), urinary volume (Vu), urine specific gravity (Gu), plasma osmolality (Posm), sweat rate (S R), and hydration level were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA in a split plot design, followed by the Newman-Keuls test. There were no differences in Vu, Posm, Gu and S R responses between HY and NO during heat exercise with or without water ingestion but there was a gradual increase in HR (59 and 51%), SBP (18 and 28%), DP (80 and 95%), Tre (1.4 and 1.3%), and Tsk (6 and 3%) in HY and NO, respectively. HY had higher HR (10%), SBP (21%), DBP (20%), DP (34%), and Tsk (1%) than NO during both experimental situations. The exercise-related differences in SBP, DP and Tsk between HY and NO were increased by water ingestion (P < 0.05). The results showed that cardiac work and Tsk during exercise were higher in HY than in NO and the difference between the two groups increased even further with water ingestion. It was concluded that hydration protocol recommended for NO during exercise could induce an abnormal cardiac and thermoregulatory responses for HY individuals without drug therapy.
Effects of submaximal exercise with water ingestion on intraocular pressure in healthy human males
Moura, M.A.;Rodrigues, L.O.C.;Waisberg, Y.;de Almeida, H.G.;Silami-Garcia, E.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2002, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2002000100017
Abstract: the effects of exercise and water replacement on intraocular pressure (iop) have not been well established. furthermore, it is not known whether the temperature of the fluid ingested influences the iop response. in the present study we determined the effect of water ingestion at three temperatures (10, 24 and 38oc; 600 ml 15 min before and 240 ml 15, 30 and 45 min after the beginning of each experimental session) on the iop of six healthy male volunteers (age = 24.0 ± 3.5 years, weight = 67.0 ± 4.8 kg, peak oxygen uptake (vo2peak) = 47.8 ± 9.1 ml kg-1 min-1). the subjects exercised until exhaustion on a cycle ergometer at a 60% vo2peak in a thermoneutral environment. iop was measured before and after exercise and during recovery (15, 30 and 45 min) using the applanation tonometry method. skin and rectal temperatures, heart rate and oxygen uptake were measured continuously. iop was similar for the right eye and the left eye and increased post-water ingestion under both exercising and resting conditions (p<0.05) but did not differ between resting and exercising situations, or between the three water temperatures. time to exhaustion was not affected by the different water temperatures. rectal temperature, hydration status, heart rate, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide extraction and lactate concentration were increased by exercise but were not affected by water temperature. we conclude that iop was not affected by exercise and that water ingestion increased iop as expected, regardless of water temperature.
Luteal phase of the menstrual cycle increases sweating rate during exercise
Garcia, A.M.C.;Lacerda, M.G.;Fonseca, I.A.T.;Reis, F.M.;Rodrigues, L.O.C.;Silami-Garcia, E.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2006005000007
Abstract: the present study evaluated whether the luteal phase elevation of body temperature would be offset during exercise by increased sweating, when women are normally hydrated. eleven women performed 60 min of cycling exercise at 60% of their maximal work load at 32oc and 80% relative air humidity. each subject participated in two identical experimental sessions: one during the follicular phase (between days 5 and 8) and the other during the luteal phase (between days 22 and 25). women with serum progesterone >3 ng/ml, in the luteal phase were classified as group 1 (n = 4), whereas the others were classified as group 2 (n = 7). post-exercise urine volume (213 ± 80 vs 309 ± 113 ml) and specific urine gravity (1.008 ± 0.003 vs 1.006 ± 0.002) changed (p < 0.05) during the luteal phase compared to the follicular phase in group 1. no menstrual cycle dependence was observed for these parameters in group 2. sweat rate was higher (p < 0.05) in the luteal (3.10 ± 0.81 g m-2 min-1) than in the follicular phase (2.80 ± 0.64 g m-2 min-1) only in group 1. during exercise, no differences related to menstrual cycle phases were seen in rectal temperature, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, mean skin temperature, and pre- and post-exercise body weight. women exercising in a warm and humid environment with water intake seem to be able to adapt to the luteal phase increase of basal body temperature through reduced urinary volume and increased sweating rate.
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