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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 208388 matches for " Daniels L "
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Knowledge, attitudes and practices of nursing staff regarding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in non-accredited obstetric units in Cape Town
L Daniels, D Jackson
South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 2011,
Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI); to assess the knowledge of maternity obstetric unit (MOU) managers regarding BFHI principles and their attitude towards BFHI implementation; and to describe the barriers and constraints to the implementation of BFHI principles. Study design: Cross-sectional descriptive survey. Setting: The study was done in eight non-BFHI-accredited primary care maternity obstetric units in Cape Town. Subjects: The subjects were eight MOU managers and a random sample of 45 nursing staff. Outcomes measures: Knowledge, attitude and practices regarding BFHI and barriers to BFHI implementation were assessed by an intervieweradministered questionnaire. Results: The study demonstrated acceptable awareness and knowledge of the recommended BFHI principles. A total of 56.6% of the staff could define rooming-in, 47.2% could define the components of the BFHI, and 52.8% could name three baby-friendly care practices and routines. Eighty-nine per cent of the nursing staff were able to demonstrate correct positioning of the baby for breastfeeding, and 91.1% could demonstrate the correct attachment of the baby to the breast. Only 8.9% of the nursing staff were able to adequately demonstrate the correct hand milk-expressing technique, 35.6% knew about the correct management of painful nipples and 22.2% knew how to manage engorgement. Only 40% could adequately describe the safe preparation of infant formula. The enrolled nursing assistants (ENA) were significantly less knowledgeable than the other cadres of nurses. The majority of the nurses had a positive attitude toward BFHI principles and practices.
Mice left out in the cold: commentary on the phenotype of TRPM8-nulls
Richard L Daniels, David D McKemy
Molecular Pain , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8069-3-23
Abstract: The ability of all species to detect ever-changing environmental temperatures is critical for homeostasis and survival. Recently, three research groups, led by Bautista, Colburn, and Dhaka, have reported that mice with a disruption in the gene encoding the cold and menthol receptor TRPM8 exhibit remarkable deficiencies in a range of cold responses [1-3]. These results suggest that TRPM8 is the predominant detector of cold temperatures in vivo, and serves a number of important roles in somatosensation, nociception, and analgesia.The last decade has yielded remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of thermosensation and pain (nociception), particularly with the cloning of a number of temperature-gated, excitatory ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. The founding member of this family, TRPV1, is a polymodal receptor that detects noxious heat (>43°C), acidity, and capsaicin, the 'hot' component in chili peppers [4]. Subsequently, other members of the TRPV subfamily were shown to be gated by heat and warmth, including TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4 [5]. Mice lacking each of these channels (except for TRPV2) have been generated, and all show profound deficits in thermosensory behaviors consistent with their roles as molecular thermosensors.While heat directly gates many TRPV channels, cold temperatures have been reported to activate two additional TRP channels. TRPA1 was initially reported to be activated by noxious cold (<17°C), but these results have been controversial [6]. More recent studies have shown TRPA1 to be activated by a myriad of agonists, including certain environmental irritants, pungent compounds such as mustard oil, cinnamon, and garlic, and increased intracellular calcium [7,8]. Studies of TRPA1-null mice have been less than definitive regarding the in vivo role of this channel in thermosensation. While two independent strains have confirmed the channel's chemosensory role, the researchers disagree as to whether
The influence of a moderate aerobics programme on the body self-image of women in middle adulthood
Andrea K Daniels, Rudolph L van Niekerk
South African Journal of Sports Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: Objectives. This empirical study investigated the effect of a moderate aerobic exercise programme on the body self-image of a sample of women (n=49) in middle adulthood with a mean age of 54.2 years. Methods. The participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=24) and a control group (n=25). The experimental group participated in a (guided) moderate aerobics programme over six weeks, while the control group participated in a sedentary (guided) meditation programme. The participants in both groups were assessed for body self-image using the nine factors defined in the Body Self-Image Questionnaire (BSIQ) of Rowe (2000). The BSIQ comprises both perceptual-cognitive and affective-attitudinal factors. Results. The results indicated that there was an overall positive shift in the perceptual-cognitive factors of the body self-image in the exercise group, namely for overall appearance evaluation, health fitness evaluation and fatness evaluation. Although no significant shifts were found in all the affective-attitudinal factors of the participants, there was a significant change in the negative affect of the participants. Conclusion. The results suggest that such a programme has a positive influence on the way these women think and feel about their bodies. No significant changes were found in the body selfimage of the control group. These findings suggest the positive effect of a (guided) aerobic exercise programme in improving the body self-image of women in middle adulthood. SAJSM, vol 23 No. 4 2011
Pharmacy cases in Second Life: an elective course
Veronin MA, Daniels L, Demps E
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S35358
Abstract: rmacy cases in Second Life: an elective course Case report (1064) Total Article Views Authors: Veronin MA, Daniels L, Demps E Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 105 - 112 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S35358 Received: 26 June 2012 Accepted: 14 August 2012 Published: 11 October 2012 Michael A Veronin,1,2 Lacy Daniels,1,2 Elaine Demps2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, 2Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USA Abstract: Interactive pharmacy case studies are an essential component of the pharmacy curriculum. We recently developed an elective course at the Rangel College of Pharmacy in pharmacy case studies for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy students using Second Life (SL), an interactive three-dimensional virtual environment that simulates the real world. This course explored the use of SL for education and training in pharmacy, emphasizing a case-based approach. Virtual worlds such as SL promote inquiry-based learning and conceptual understanding, and can potentially develop problem-solving skills in pharmacy students. Students were presented ten case scenarios that primarily focused on drug safety and effective communication with patients. Avatars, representing instructors and students, reviewed case scenarios during sessions in a virtual classroom. Individually and in teams, students participated in active-learning activities modeling both the pharmacist’s and patient’s roles. Student performance and learning were assessed based on SL class participation, activities, assignments, and two formal, essay-type online exams in Blackboard 9. Student course-evaluation results indicated favorable perceptions of content and delivery. Student comments included an enhanced appreciation of practical issues in pharmacy practice, flexibility of attendance, and an increased ability to focus on course content. Excellent student participation and performance in weekly active-learning activities translated into positive performance on subsequent formal assessments. Students were actively engaged and exposed to topics pertinent to pharmacy practice that were not covered in the required pharmacy curriculum. The multiple active-learning assignments were successful in increasing students’ knowledge, and provided additional practice in building the communication skills beneficial for students preparing for experiential clinical rotations.
Pharmacy cases in Second Life: an elective course
Veronin MA,Daniels L,Demps E
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Michael A Veronin,1,2 Lacy Daniels,1,2 Elaine Demps21Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, 2Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USAAbstract: Interactive pharmacy case studies are an essential component of the pharmacy curriculum. We recently developed an elective course at the Rangel College of Pharmacy in pharmacy case studies for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy students using Second Life (SL), an interactive three-dimensional virtual environment that simulates the real world. This course explored the use of SL for education and training in pharmacy, emphasizing a case-based approach. Virtual worlds such as SL promote inquiry-based learning and conceptual understanding, and can potentially develop problem-solving skills in pharmacy students. Students were presented ten case scenarios that primarily focused on drug safety and effective communication with patients. Avatars, representing instructors and students, reviewed case scenarios during sessions in a virtual classroom. Individually and in teams, students participated in active-learning activities modeling both the pharmacist’s and patient’s roles. Student performance and learning were assessed based on SL class participation, activities, assignments, and two formal, essay-type online exams in Blackboard 9. Student course-evaluation results indicated favorable perceptions of content and delivery. Student comments included an enhanced appreciation of practical issues in pharmacy practice, flexibility of attendance, and an increased ability to focus on course content. Excellent student participation and performance in weekly active-learning activities translated into positive performance on subsequent formal assessments. Students were actively engaged and exposed to topics pertinent to pharmacy practice that were not covered in the required pharmacy curriculum. The multiple active-learning assignments were successful in increasing students’ knowledge, and provided additional practice in building the communication skills beneficial for students preparing for experiential clinical rotations.Keywords: Second Life, virtual worlds, pharmacy case studies, computer simulation, health education, pharmacy education
Nutrient Composition of Dust Emitted from Poultry Broiler Houses in Northwest Arkansas  [PDF]
Sheri L. Herron, Kristofor R. Brye, Andrew N. Sharpley, David M. Miller, Mike B. Daniels
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2015.611110
Abstract: A substantial body of research has been conducted on the potential water quality impairments associated with land application of poultry broiler litter. However, until recently, little attention has focused on the potential for nutrient runoff from dust emitted from broiler production houses despite related air quality concerns raised by the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency. The objective of this study was to characterize the composition of broiler house dust (BHD) and compare BHD composition to that of broiler litter (BL). Dust composition varied significantly (P < 0.05) among facilities operated by different integrator companies, likely due to differences in feed and house management among integrators. Specifically, BHD pH was lower (P < 0.05) in Facility 1 than in Facilities 2 and 3, which did not differ, whereas BHD K and Ca were greatest (P < 0.05) in Facility 1 and 2, respectively. The facility average moisture content of BHD was at least 1.9 times lower than that for the BL from the same facility. The facility average total phosphorus (TP) and water extractable phosphorus (WEP) concentrations in BHD were at least 1.2 and 1.6 times greater, respectively, than that for BL from the same facility. The greater WEP in BHD than in BL is of particular environmental importance given that extensive research shows WEP to be a major variable influencing P runoff risk. The facility average total nitrogen (TN) concentration in BHD was at least 3.0 times greater than that for BL from the same facility. As TP, WEP, and TN are greater in BHD than in BL, there is a greater risk of nutrient enrichment of runoff from an equivalent mass of BHD than BL. The results of this study highlight the need for careful management of dust emissions from broiler houses and a need for conservation practices to minimize the risk of BHD increasing nutrient runoff and its loss to waters of the US.
Propagating Waves in a Monolayer of Gas-Fluidized Rods
L. J. Daniels,D. J. Durian
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.061304
Abstract: We report on an observation of propagating compression waves in a quasi-two-dimensional monolayer of apolar granular rods fluidized by an upflow of air. The collective wave speed is an order of magnitude faster than the speed of the particles. This gives rise to anomalously large number fluctuations dN ~ $N^{0.72 \pm 0.04}$, which are greater than ordinary number fluctuations of N^{1/2}. We characterize the waves by calculating the spatiotemporal power spectrum of the density. The position of observed peaks, as a function of frequency w and wavevector k, yields a linear dispersion relationship in the long-time, long-wavelength limit and a wavespeed c = w/k. Repeating this analysis for systems at different densities and air speeds, we observe a linear increase in the wavespeed with increasing packing fraction with no dependence on the airflow. Although air-fluidized rods self-propel individually or in dilute collections, the parallel and perpendicular root-mean-square speeds of the rods indicate that they no longer self-propel when propagating waves are present. Based on this mutual exclusivity, we map out the phase behavior for the existence of waves vs self-propulsion as a function of density and fluidizing airflow.
Determination of Nutrient Concentrations in Simulated Rainfall-Runoff from Poultry House Dust Deposited Adjacent to Exhaust Fans  [PDF]
Sheri L. Herron, Andrew N. Sharpley, Kristofor R. Brye, David M. Miller, Susan Watkins, David McCreery, Mike B. Daniels
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2016.71003
Abstract: Until recently, little attention has been given to the loss of nutrients that may occur in stormwater runoff from poultry houses. Dust emitted from poultry house fans and deposited near the fans has been shown to contain similar amounts of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) as in poultry litter, thus, there is need for information on the potential of runoff to transport deposited dust off-site. The objectives of this study are to quantify P and N in simulated rainfall-runoff from sites immediately adjacent to fans (sidewall and tunnel) from a commercial poultry house in northwest Arkansas. Runoff from fan plots range in total P (TP) and total N (TN) concentration from 1.0 to 26.0 mg·L-1 and from 5.1 to 189 mg·L-1. The concentration of P and N in runoff from plots adjacent to sidewall fans is significantly lower (P < 0.05) during warmer (June to August; 1 and 2 mg·L-1 for TP and TN, respectively) than cooler months (November through March; 3 and 7 mg·L-1 for TP and TN, respectively). In contrast, TP and TN concentrations of runoff from tunnel fan plots are significantly greater (P < 0.05) during warm (14 and 170 mg·L-1, respectively) than cool months (5 and 60 mg·L-1, respectively). The results of this research indicate that conservation practices are needed around poultry production houses to minimize the potential for runoff of nutrients in emitted dust entering nearby surface waters.
Genetic and health issues emerging from sperm donation—The experiences and views of donors  [PDF]
Ken Daniels, Wendy Kramer
Advances in Reproductive Sciences (ARSci) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/arsci.2013.13003
Abstract: 164 previous sperm donors completed an online survey regarding health and genetic experiences and views. Results highlight that donors desire to act responsibly with recruiting facilities is not always possible. Objective: Obtaining the views and experiences of sperm donors regarding health and genetic matters. Design: Online survey. Setting: Not applicable. Participants: 164 previous sperm donors. Interventions: Not applicable. Main outcome measures: Views and experiences on health and genetic issues. Results: A variety of approaches are adopted by recruiting facilities in regard to selection and post-donation factors. The vast majority of donors said they had not been contacted by the facility they donated at to update their medical information, while almost one quarter of donors indicated that a health or genetic risk factor had occurred. A great majority of donors felt that they had not received any education or counselling on the potential curiosities of donor conceived people. Donors sought to be honest and open with staff but often found there were difficulties in doing so. Conclusions: Overall, donors indicate that they see donating as involving responsibilities to the offspring and families. The study highlights however that their ability to act responsibly is limited by some of the interactions or lack of them with the facilities where they donated. Implications for recruiting facilities need to be considered.
Recovery of Aluminium Oxide from Flint Clay through H2SO4 Leaching
Angus L. Daniels,Edison Muzenda,Mohamed Belaid,Freeman Ntuli
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract:
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