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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1762 matches for " DN Yadav "
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Influence of Integrated Weed Management Practices on Dynamics and Weed Control Efficiency in Dry Direct Seeded Rice
KP Bhurer,DN Yadav,JK Ladha,RB Thapa,KR Pandey
Nepal Journal of Science and Technology , 2013, DOI: 10.3126/njst.v14i2.10413
Abstract: Field experiment under dry direct seeded rice(O ryza sativa L.) was conducted during rainy season of 2010 and 2011 at Regional Agriculture Research Station (RARS), Parwanipur, Bara to develop appropriate weed management practices for dry direct- seeded rice. The trial was laid-out in randomized complete block design (RCBD) and replicated thrice. Observations were taken on weed, plant growth and yield attributing, yield, and socio-economic parameters. The weed density, dry weed weight and weed control efficiency resulted significantly different as influenced by integrated weed management practices. Low weed population density, low weed index and highest weed control efficiency resulted by pendimethalin followed by 2, 4- D followed by one hand weeding were at par with weed free check. Highest yield resulted from weed free plot followed by pendimethalin followed by two hand weeding and pendimethalin followed by 2, 4- D followed by one hand weeding. However, the net return per unit investment resulted highest in pendimethalin followed by 2, 4- D followed by one hand weeding. This proved that amid increasing wage rate and labour scarcity integrated weed management through pendimethalin 30 EC (Stomp) @1 kg a. i. /ha as pre- emergence herbicide application followed by 2, 4- D sodium salt 80 WP @ 0.5 kg a. i. /ha followed by one hand weeding or stale seed bed followed by pendimethalin 30 EC (Stomp) @1 kg a. i. /ha followed by bispyribac (Nominee gold) @25 g a. i. /ha 10% @200 ml/ha at 20 days of seeding resulted best alternative for manual hand weeding practices giving higher net return per unit investment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/njst.v14i2.10413 ? Nepal Journal of Science and Technology Vol. 14, No. 2 (2013) 33-42
Effect of integrated weed management practices on performance of dry direct seeded rice (Oryza sativa L.)
KP Bhurer, DN Yadav, JK Ladha, RB Thapa, K Pandey
Agronomy Journal of Nepal , 2013, DOI: 10.3126/ajn.v3i0.9006
Abstract: Weeds are serious problem in dry direct seeded rice (DDSR). A field experiment was conducted during rainy seasons of 2010 and 2011 at research farm of the Regional Agricultural Research Station (RARS) Parwanipur, to study the effect of integrated weed management practices on the performance of dry direct seeded rice. Ten treatment combinations viz; weedy, weed free (weekly), Pendimethalin fb (followed by) Bispyribac, Pendimethalin fb two hand weeding, Stale seedbed fb Bispyribac, Stale seedbed fb Pendimethalin fb Bispyribac, Mulch 4 t/ha fb Bispyribac fb one hand weeding, Stale seedbed fb mulch 4 t/ha fb Bispyribac, Pendimethalin and Sesbania co-culture fb 2,4-D Na salt fb one hand weeding and Pendimethalin fb 2,4-D fb one hand weeding were tested in a randomized complete block design and replicated thrice. Observations were taken on weed, plant growth and yield attributes, yield, and socio-economic parameters. All weed control treatments significantly reduced the weed density and dry weight of weed resulting significant increase in yield of DSR over weedy check in both years. Weed free treatment resulted the highest yield, however, it was not economical due to high cost of cultivation. The use of Pendimethalin fb 2,4-D fb one hand weeding produced yield (5161 in 2010 and 6160 kg/ha in 2011) which were statistically at par with yield (5305 in 2010 and 6319 kg/ha in 2011) obtained under the weed free treatment. Further, the highest benefit cost ratio (CBR) 1.77 and 2.22 and net return Rs 47700 and 75084/ha during 2010 and 2011, respectively, were obtained under this treatment indicating its superiority over other treatments. The grain yield, yield attributing characters viz. panicles per m2, panicle weight, filled grain per panicle, thousand grain weight as influenced by different weed management practices revealed that higher yield resulted from weed free plot followed by Pendimethalin followed by two hand weeding and Pendimethalin followed by 2,4-D followed by one hand weeding. However, the net return per unit investment resulted highest in Pendimethalin followed by 2,4-D followed by one hand weeding. This proved that amid increasing wage rate and labor scarcity integrated weed management through Pendimethalin 30 EC (stomp) @ 1 kg a. i./ha as pre- emergence herbicide application followed by 2,4-D sodium salt 80 WP @ 0.5 kg a.i./ha followed by one hand weeding or stale seed bed followed by Pendimethalin 30 EC (stomp) @ 1 kg a. i./ha followed by Bispyribac (nominee gold) @ 25 g a. i./ha 10 % @ 200 ml/ha at 20 days of seeding resulted best alternative for
Meiosis in the domestic ruminants with particular reference to Robertsonian translocations
DN Logue
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1977, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-9-4-493
Abstract:
The Application of Spatial Pattern Analysis in High School Level Geography
DN Foin
Information Manager (The) , 2009,
Abstract: Geography is a vital subject of the school curriculum which is creative, practical and intellectually stimulating. It tries to identify features on the field, their spatial pattern as well as give explanations to process which have generated the observed distributional patterns their location and provide scientific explanation for the evolution of such patterns. It deals with concepts needed to develop a sharp geographical mind capable of appreciating and solving important spatial problems. This article examines the importance and application of core concepts, nature and observations needed to help students at high school.
The Impact of Road Network on Distribution of Social Amenities: A Case Study of Giwa Local Government Area of Kaduna State
DN Foin
Information Manager (The) , 2007,
Abstract: The study focused on the effect of roads on the distribution of social amenities in Giwa Local Government Area of Kaduna State. It took a critical look at the road network connectivity and accessibility of the towns in Giwa in an attempt to understanding the level to which these road network components affected the distribution of social infrastructure. The data for this study was derived from secondary sources ; (i)The topology of the routes was extracted from the base map of the local government area, and this took some of the road network component. (ii)The statistical data on social amenities in the Local Government Area came from the various departments in the local government headquarters. A correlation analysis was applied on the data and the results tested for significance. Results of the study showed that the relationship between road network, and node accessibility and the distribution of social amenities, with a correlation coefficient explanation of 36.9%. The high disparity observed in the distribution of social amenities is the result of very poor connectivity index as revealed by the road network in the area. The Information Manager Vol. 7 (2) 2007: pp. 1-7
Symbolism in the Samaria ivories and architecture
DN Pienaar
Acta Theologica , 2008,
Abstract: Situated at the crossroads of great nations, the Land of Israel was exposed to numerous external influences. Samaria, the capital city of Northern Israel, was also situated on a major trade route. Various expeditions uncovered approximately 500 pieces of carved ivory in the palace complex at Samaria. According to the motifs carved in them, these pieces can be divided into two main groups. The first group is categorised by the Harpocrates medallion. The Hah and Isis and Nephtys plaques are also relevant in this case. The second group consists mainly of the so-called Woman at the Window, the Winged Sphinx, Winged Figures in Human Form, Horus and Ma’at, the Lion and Bull Plaques, as well as the Tree of Life Motif in ivory. The latter is also represented in the Proto-Ionic capitals uncovered at many different sites, including Samaria. This article discusses the different cultural influences and motifs, and explains their presence.
Marketing Of Agricultural Food Grains In Selected Markets In Zaria Area
DN Foin
Information Manager (The) , 2006,
Abstract: This study describes the organizational structure and marketing processes of the traditional agricultural marketing system with emphasis on the links between the village producer and the urban consumer using four food grains staple crops marketed in Zaria marketing area. The findings of the study showed that there is considerable organization in the marketing process and the intermediaries provide productive marketing services at reasonable costs given their technical environment. The study further showed that farmers received 78%, 79.4, 79.8 and 83% of the prices from the four major staple food grains. The analysis of inter-market price relationships revealed price spread in excess of transfer costs in the study area, implying imperfections in the markets. Other findings in the study discovered that traders do not have monopolistic power to attain such profits. Evidence supporting this view includes the finding that little storage takes place by traders in the urban daily market of Zaria. In the urban markets trader's monthly purchases are about equal to monthly sales. There is a conterminous flow of grains to these urban markets from the rural areas. The large amount of grains is stored by farmers. The Information Manager Vol. 6 (1&2) 2006: pp. 25-34
Attracting Foreign Direct Investment for Growth and Development in sub-Saharan Africa: Policy Options and Strategic Alternatives David N.
DN Abdulai
Africa Development , 2007,
Abstract: Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) plays an important role in fostering economic growth and development in developing countries. While FDI is known to bring to the latter much needed capital for their growth and development efforts, it also brings with it skills and new technology. For most countries in sub-Saharan Africa, whose economies have recently recovered from a long period of stagnation, FDI inflows are needed to accelerate growth, and development. Several countries in the region registered impressive growth rates in the 1990s, with some attaining and sustaining double-digit growth rates in most recent times. However, if sub-Saharan Africa is to accelerate its growth rates to enable it move the majority of its peoples out of poverty, it must attract more FDI. Efforts so far have been encouraging. However, when compared to countries in South East Asia such as Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and China, FDI inflows into sub-Saharan Africa pale. What are the causes for such low FDI inflows to this region? How can sub-Saharan Africa attract more FDI for its growth and development efforts? What policy options are available to these countries? What strategic alternatives can sub-Saharan countries adopt to increase FDI inflows? What role can multilateral and bilateral organisations play in this effort? This paper will address these questions by examining current FDI flows into sub-Saharan Africa and examine ways through which the sub-region can further attract much needed FDI to enable it to attain sustainable growth and development.
The Choice And Effect Of Mode Of Transportation In The Flow Of Agricultural Food Stuff In Rural Urban Flow: A Case Study Of Zaria Area
DN Foin
Samaru Journal of Information Studies , 2006,
Abstract: The study determined the choice and effect of modes of transportation in rural-urban flow of Agricultural food products to Zaria urban center. The primary data were obtained for the investigation using a structured sets of questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used for the investigation. The results showed that cereal crops constitute the main grains in the area for sale. The specialization in the supply of food stuff to Zaria town conforms to Von Thunen's model of concentric. Zonation. Perishable and less bulky market garden products are supplied from areas immediately surrounding the urban area while others come from location of 16km and above. The study further showed that the most single means of transportation used to transport food grains to Zaria town is motor vehicle and closely followed by motor cycle. These means of transportation are used in combination with one or the other with one being dominant at one location. Also the distance of location from Zaria town appears to be the single most important factor affecting the use of one or the other means of available transportation system. It was observed that some means of transportation are rejected at certain points (locations) because of the degree of risk. Base on this finding, the following recommendations are put forward. That urban planners should identify the pre-urban critical thresholds over which motor vehicle transport is not enough so as to extend more town city motor vehicle services to move food stuff to Zaria Town. That town planners who exist separately from rural development planners should be replaced by a common central planning authority which can handle as a united issue all aspects of development planning, including transportation, both in the urban and rural areas. Samaru Journal of Information Studies Vol. 6 (1&2) 2006: pp. 19-27
Sources and Accessibility of Credit to Farmers For Agricultural Financing In Makarfi Local Government Area of Kaduna State.
DN Foin
Samaru Journal of Information Studies , 2007,
Abstract: The study was carried out to determine the sources and accessibility of credit to farmers for agricultural financing in Makerifi Local Government Area of Kaduna State of Nigeria. Primary data was used for the study. Primary data was obtained using a structured set of questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis were used for the investigation. The result obtained show that 95.3% of the sampled farmers were between the age bracket of 21-50 years while 85.9% of the respondent had received one form of education or the other. 85.9% of the respondents have been farming for between 1 – 40 year. The result further revealed that 91.1% of the farmers in the area had 4 – 16 children as members of household size. The level of education and years of farming were the significant factors influencing access to credit by farmers in the area under study. 76.5% obtained loans from formal sources, while 23.5% got loans through informal sources. Further analysis, 24.7% of the farmers sampled, had problems of delay in approval and obtaining loans through formal sources while 4.7% of those sampled complained about delay in getting credit through informal sources. Based on the findings, the following recommendations were put forward. That there should be (i) minimization and simplification of procedures in obtaining loans from formal and information sources. This will enhance timely disbursement of loans to the farmers; and. Interest rates charged on loans by both formal and informal sources should be minimal. Samaru Journal of Information Studies Vol. 7 (2) 2007: pp. 34-38
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