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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 307438 matches for " D.B.;Sauzem "
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Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice
Tabarelli Z.,Berlese D.B.,Sauzem P.D.,Mello C.F.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003,
Abstract: Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL) is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage) on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight) and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight) or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight). CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage) in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage) in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.
Antinociceptive effect of novel pyrazolines in mice
Tabarelli Z.,Rubin M.A.,Berlese D.B.,Sauzem P.D.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2004,
Abstract: The antinociceptive effect of six novel synthetic pyrazolines (3-ethoxymethyl-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 1) and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 2) and phenyl (Pz 3) analogues, and 3-(1-ethoxyethyl)-5-ethoxycarbonyl-1H-pyrazole (Pz 4) and its corresponding 1-substituted methyl (Pz 5) and phenyl (Pz 6) analogues) was evaluated by the tail immersion test in adult male albino mice. The animals (N = 11-12 in each group) received vehicle (5% Tween 80, 10 ml/kg, sc) or 1.5 mmol/kg of each of the pyrazolines (Pz 1-Pz 6), sc. Fifteen, thirty and sixty minutes after drug administration, the mice were subjected to the tail immersion test. Thirty minutes after drug administration Pz 2 and Pz 3 increased tail withdrawal latency (vehicle = 3.4 ± 0.2; Pz 2 = 5.2 ± 0.4; Pz 3 = 5.9 ± 0.4 s; mean ± SEM), whereas the other pyrazolines did not present antinociceptive activity. Dose-effect curves (0.15 to 1.5 mmol/kg) were constructed for the bioactive pyrazolines. Pz 2 (1.5 mmol/kg, sc) impaired motor coordination in the rotarod and increased immobility in the open-field test. Pz 3 did not alter rotarod performance and spontaneous locomotion, but increased immobility in the open field at the dose of 1.5 mmol/kg. The involvement of opioid mechanisms in the pyrazoline-induced antinociception was investigated by pretreating the animals with naloxone (2.75 μmol/kg, sc). Naloxone prevented Pz 3- but not Pz 2-induced antinociception. Moreover, naloxone pretreatment did not alter Pz 3-induced immobility. We conclude that Pz 3-induced antinociception involves opioid mechanisms but this is not the case for Pz 2.
Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice
Tabarelli, Z.;Berlese, D.B.;Sauzem, P.D.;Mello, C.F.;Rubin, M.A.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2003, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2003000100016
Abstract: surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. cremophor el (crel) is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. the antinociceptive effect of crel (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage) on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight) and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight) or saline (0.9% nacl, 10 ml/kg body weight). crel reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. at 10.6 g/kg, crel caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage) in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage) in the tail immersion test. the effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. these data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in crel.
Mechanism of Action, Toxicity and Nutritional Significance of Heat-Labile Antinutritional Factors in Some Legumes: A Review
D.B. Oke
Journal of Food Technology , 2013,
Abstract: Legumes which are widely consumed all over the world have constituent that depress their utilization. Some of these constituents called antinutritional factor, trypsin inhibitor and haemagglutinin, are heat-labile. Trypsin inhibitor inhibits growth by interfering with the digestion of protein in the intestine of animals thereby causing hypertrophy of the pancreas. Unless legumes are heated before consumption, methionine would be slowly liberated by the proteolytic enzymes and its absorption delayed. Because iectins are capable of agglutinating red blood cells, intake of or improperly cooked legumes is deleterious. Phytohaemagglutinins are known to exert a non-selective adverse effect on the absorption of nutrients form the intestinal tract rather than a direct effect on the digestive process.
Spiritual Dimensions Of Health
Bisht D.B
Indian Journal of Community Medicine , 1985,
Abstract:
SOME ROMAN COINS FROM REGENSBURG IN JOHANNESBURG
D.B. Saddington
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/46-0-122
Abstract: Last year Mr. R. Faltermeier, a student in the Department of Classics at the University of the Witwatersrand, brought me nine Roman coins which he asked me to identify. He said that they had been brought to South Africa when his father had emigrated here from Regensburg in Germany.
A ROMAN INSCRIPTION IN CAPE TOWN
D.B. Saddington
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/46-0-123
Abstract: The South African Cultural History Museum in Cape Town is well known for its fine collections, not least those of Greek and Roman antiquities.2 On my last visit to Cape Town I was surprised to see something in the museum which I had not noticed before, a Latin inscription attached to the wall. There are of course very few ancient Latin inscriptions in South Africa.
A FURTHER LATIN INSCRIPTION AND AN AMPHORA IN CAPE TOWN
D.B. Saddington
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/49-0-91
Abstract: In a former volume of this journal I described a Latin inscription in the Cape Town Museum (Akroterion XLVI [2001] 99f.). On a subsequent visit to the city, I went to the Wine Museum on the Groot Constantia estate.2 I was interested to find two Roman objects there, an inscription and an amphora.
A TILE FROM ROMAN VIENNA IN JOHANNESBURG
D.B. Saddington
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/51-0-68
Abstract: Recently Mr W.H. Grimm, who grew up in Vienna, asked me to decipher the letters on a fragment of a tile which he had found as a boy at Carnuntum. Apparently it was lying on the roadside having been thrown there by a farmer ploughing an adjacent field.
Roman Warfare
D.B. Saddington
Akroterion , 2012, DOI: 10.7445/55-0-20
Abstract: ROTH, Jonathan P 2009. Roman Warfare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pbk. R250. ISBN 978-0-521-53726-1. Jonathan Roth of San Jose State University, known as an expert on military logistics, has written this attractive Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization volume on Roman Warfare. The series is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Roman antiquity. The book comprises an Introduction on Sources and Methods (pp. 1-6) and 15 chapters on Roman warfare from the beginnings to the fall of the Western Empire in AD 476, using a chronological approach. There are 68 illustrations and maps, a Timeline, a Glossary, a Glossary of People, a Bibliography (which includes several websites) and an Index.
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