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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 42 matches for " Coxiella burnettii "
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A nested case control study demonstrating increased chronic fatigue six years after a Q fever outbreak
Hugo C. van Woerden,Brendan Healy,Meirion B. Llewelyn,Ian P. Matthews
Microbiology Research , 2011, DOI: 10.4081/mr.2011.e19
Abstract: The frequency and range of long-term sequelae following acute Q fever infection remains controversial. This study aimed to assess a range of potential psychological and physical sequelae in a follow up study of a large outbreak of Q fever that occurred in Newport, Wales, in 2002. A nested case control study was undertaken six years after a point source outbreak of Q fever. We invited a cohort of 211 factory workers exposed to a point source of Q fever in 2002 to attend a follow up clinic in 2008. Cases, defined as those who had clinical symptoms and serological evidence of acute Q fever in 2002, were compared to controls, who worked in the same factory but were serologically negative at the time of the outbreak. At the follow up clinic blood was taken for Coxiella burnetii microimmunofluorescence and questionnaires were completed including the PHQ-9, Chalder Fatigue scale, and General Health Questionnaire. Results were obtained for 32 cases and 13 controls. Chalder Fatigue scores were significantly raised in the cases (independent samples t-test: P=0.047). PHQ-9 and GHQ scores were not significantly raised in cases. However, post hoc cross sectional analysis indicated a relationship between Phase 2 IgG at follow up in 2008 and Chalder Fatigue scores (P=0.004) and PHQ-9 scores (0.049). A longitudinal association was demonstrated between acute Q fever infection and chronic fatigue six years later. In crosssectional analysis a previously unreported relationship between depression scores (PHQ- 9) and positive Q fever serology was also identified.
Q Fever in Pregnancy—Case Presentation and Literature Review  [PDF]
Kugler Eitan, Amital Howard, Alon Danny
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2013.48065
Abstract:

Q fever is a widespread zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii. During acute infection, three clinical patterns are commonly encountered—self limited, flu like disease, atypical pneumonia or hepatits. Chronic infection almost always implies endocarditis. Acute infection during pregnancy may result in obstetrical complications, and predispose to chronic transformation. Treatment during pregnancy is more complex, and the duration of treatment was debatable up until recently. We describe a 31 years old patient with acute Q fever infection during pregnancy. We review the medical treatment, complications and follow up of acute and chronic Q fever during pregnancy.

Zoonotic Pathogens in Ticks Collected from Livestock in Kenya  [PDF]
Mishael Oswe, Rose Odhiambo, Beth Mutai, Nancy Nyakoe, George Awinda, John N. Waitumbi
Open Journal of Preventive Medicine (OJPM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2018.88021
Abstract: Ticks are reservoirs of a variety of pathogens including bacteria, viruses and protozoa. We used PCR to detect pathogens of public health importance in ticks collected from diverse regions of Kenya. 503 tick pools were collected from 982 cattle, 300 sheep and 379 goats that were presented for slaughter at major abattoirs in Nairobi and Mombasa. Tick DNA was screened by qPCR optimized for single-plex detection of Babesia microti, two-plex Coxiella burnetii/Ehrlichia chaffeensis or Bartonella henselae/Borrelia recurrentis or three-plex for the non-human Babesia spp/Anaplasma phagocytophylum/Borrelia burgdorferi. Pathogen prevalence was calculated against tick type and the geographical origin. Computational analysis was performed with Graphpad prism 5. Out of 503 tick analyzed, 21% (106) were positive for at least one pathogen. C. burnetii was the most abundant at 70% (74/106), followed by non-human Babesia at 17% (18/106), 5% (5/106) for B. burgdorferi, 7% (7/106) for other Borrelia species and <1% (1/106) for E. chaffeensis and A. phagocytophylum. B. henselae and the human infective B. microti were not detected. Rh. pulchellus was the most promiscuous one in carrying pathogens: C. burnetti, Babesia, B. burgdorferi, E. chaffeensis and A. phagocytophylum. Non-human infective Babesia were detected in all ticks except Amblyomma. Four counties had 70% of the infected ticks: Marsabit 25% (n = 26/106), Kajiado 17% (18/106), Wajir 16% (17/106) and Narok 11% (12/106). This study identified a number of tick-borne pathogens that cause febrile infections often confused with malaria. Follow-up research will be needed to determine prevalence in humans.
Seropositividad a Coxiella burnetii en cabras de la parroquia Trinidad Samuel del municipio Torres, estado Lara, Venezuela
Oropeza,Mariangel; Dickson,Luis; Maldonado,Jesús; Kowalski,Andrés;
Zootecnia Tropical , 2010,
Abstract: in order to dismiss coxiella burnetti as a possible etiologic agent responsible of the high percentage of abortion and kids born weak reported by traditional goat farmers of three sectors of the trinidad samuel county of the torres municipality of lara state of venezuela, samples of 315 animals were taken from a total 924 goats belonging to 7 herds with a history of high percentage of abortions. samples were analyzed through elisa indirect method using idexx laboratory kit. results showed that 191 (60,63%) of samples were seropositive to c. burnetti. statical diference (p<0,05) was found for three sector under study, villa araure 67,7 %; sabana grande 68,2% y los aranguez. 32,6%. seropositivity was high if compared to found in literature and could be the cause of abortions and weak kids reported by goat farmers. a more profound study is necessary to determine seroprevalence in goat producing zones of the state.
Endocarditis por Coxiella burnetii: fiebre Q Coxiella burnetii endocarditis: Q fever
Carlos Alberto Betancur,Ana G Múnera
Acta Medica Colombiana , 2012,
Abstract: La fiebre Q es una zoonosis causada por Coxiella burnetii; más frecuente en Europa pero reportada en otros continentes, puede cursar en forma aguda o crónica. La endocarditis es una forma de presentación crónica con curso insidioso y se asocia frecuentemente a fenómenos embólicos, representa 1% de todos los casos de endocarditis en el mundo. El diagnóstico se realiza por la sospecha clínica, cultivos negativos para patógenos convencionales y la confirmación serológica. Este artículo describe el caso clínico de un paciente con endocarditis causada por Coxiella burnetii y se revisa la literatura. (Acta Med Colomb 2012: 37: 31-33). Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. Q fever may present as subacute or chronic endocarditis, has a high incidence of embolic phenomena and is often fatal, representing 1% of all cases of endocarditis worldwide. Q fever most commonly presents an insidious course. The diagnosis is made by clinical suspicion after serial blood cultures for conventional pathogens are negative and by serological confirmation. This article describes the clinical case of a patient with endocarditis caused Coxiella burnetii and updated review of the literature. (Acta Med Colomb 2012: 37: 31-33).
Endocarditis por Coxiella burnetii: fiebre Q
Betancur,Carlos Alberto; Múnera,Ana G;
Acta Medica Colombiana , 2012,
Abstract: q fever is a zoonosis caused by coxiella burnetii. q fever may present as subacute or chronic endocarditis, has a high incidence of embolic phenomena and is often fatal, representing 1% of all cases of endocarditis worldwide. q fever most commonly presents an insidious course. the diagnosis is made by clinical suspicion after serial blood cultures for conventional pathogens are negative and by serological confirmation. this article describes the clinical case of a patient with endocarditis caused coxiella burnetii and updated review of the literature. (acta med colomb 2012: 37: 31-33).
Questing one Brazilian query: reporting 16 cases of Q fever from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Costa, Paulo Sérgio Gon?alves da;Brigatte, Marco Emilio;Greco, Dirceu Bartolomeu;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46652006000100002
Abstract: q fever has been considered non-existing in brazil where reports of clinical cases still cannot be found. this case-series of 16 patients is a result of a systematic search for such illness by means of clinical and serologic criteria. serologic testing was performed by the indirect microimmunofluorescence technique using phase i/ii c. burnetii antigens. influenza-like syndrome was the most frequent clinical form (eight cases - 50%), followed by pneumonia, fuo (fever of unknown origin), mono-like syndrome (two cases - 12.5% each), lymphadenitis (one case - 6.3%) and spondylodiscitis associated with osteomyelitis (one case - 6.3%). the ages varied from four to 67 years old with a median of 43.5. all but one patient had positive serologic tests for phase ii igg whether or not associated with igm positivity compatible with acute infection. one patient had both phase i and phase ii igg antibodies compatible with chronic q fever. seroconvertion was detected in 10 patients. despite the known limitations of serologic diagnosis, the cases here reported should encourage brazilian doctors to include q fever as an indigenous cause of febrile illness.
Emergence of Q Fever
E Angelakis,D Raoult
Iranian Journal of Public Health , 2011,
Abstract: Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis with many acute and chronic manifestations caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection, and transmission to human beings is mainly accomplished through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Persons at greatest risk are those in contact with farm animals and include farmers, abattoir workers, and veterinarians. The organs most commonly affected during Q fever are the heart, the arteries, the bones and the liver. The most common clinical presentation is an influenza-like illness with varying degrees of pneumonia and hepatitis. Although acute disease is usually self-limiting, people do occasionally die from this condition. Endocarditis is the most serious and most frequent clinical presentation of chronic Q fever. Vascular infection is the second most frequent presentation of Q fever. The diagnosis of Q fever is based on a significant increase in serum antibody titers. The treatment is effective and well tolerated, but must be adapted to the acute or chronic pattern with the tetracyclines to be considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy. For the treatment of Q fever during pregnancy the use of long-term cotrimoxazole therapy is proposed.
Questing one Brazilian query: reporting 16 cases of Q fever from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Costa Paulo Sérgio Gon?alves da,Brigatte Marco Emilio,Greco Dirceu Bartolomeu
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2006,
Abstract: Q fever has been considered non-existing in Brazil where reports of clinical cases still cannot be found. This case-series of 16 patients is a result of a systematic search for such illness by means of clinical and serologic criteria. Serologic testing was performed by the indirect microimmunofluorescence technique using phase I/II C. burnetii antigens. Influenza-like syndrome was the most frequent clinical form (eight cases - 50%), followed by pneumonia, FUO (fever of unknown origin), mono-like syndrome (two cases - 12.5% each), lymphadenitis (one case - 6.3%) and spondylodiscitis associated with osteomyelitis (one case - 6.3%). The ages varied from four to 67 years old with a median of 43.5. All but one patient had positive serologic tests for phase II IgG whether or not associated with IgM positivity compatible with acute infection. One patient had both phase I and phase II IgG antibodies compatible with chronic Q fever. Seroconvertion was detected in 10 patients. Despite the known limitations of serologic diagnosis, the cases here reported should encourage Brazilian doctors to include Q fever as an indigenous cause of febrile illness.
Association between antibodies to Coxiella burnetii in bulk tank milk and perinatal mortality of Danish dairy calves
Katrine T Nielsen, S?ren S Nielsen, Jens F Agger, Anna-Bodil Christoffersen, J?rgen S Agerholm
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0147-53-64
Abstract: Twenty-four Danish dairy herds were tested repeatedly for antibodies to C. burnetii in BTM using a commercial ELISA. Samples were collected monthly from July 2008 to July 2009. Information on the 2,362 calvings occurring in the study period was obtained from the Danish Cattle Database. Two multilevel logistic regression models were created for the two outcomes stillbirth and perinatal mortality. One model included the level of BTM antibodies in a specified period before or after the outcome had occurred. The other model included the change in antibodies over time. These predictors were included both at herd and animal level. Furthermore, all models included parity and breed.The individual monthly BTM antibody levels were highly correlated within herds. Consequently, changes in BTM antibody levels were not found to be associated with neither risk of stillbirth nor the risk of perinatal mortality. However, the risk of stillborn calves and perinatal death was higher with high level of BTM antibodies 8 to 9 months after the incident, but not outside this period.We conclude that the level of antibodies to C. burnetii in BTM may be associated with perinatal mortality, but the association was not persistent and should be investigated further.Coxiella burnetii is a cause of sporadic abortion in cattle [1,2]. The infection occurs almost world-wide and recent studies of bulk tank milk (BTM) antibodies in some European countries have shown between-herd prevalences ranging from 38 to 79% in cattle [3-5]. C. burnetii has been detected in the vagina of cattle [6], and recently infection with C. burnetii without associated placental pathology was reported [7]. C. burnetii associated abortions in ruminants are characterized by extensive necrotizing placentitis [2]. However, there is no reason to believe that C. burnetii associated placentitis differs from other bacterial infections of the pregnant uterus, where foetuses with the most severe infection are aborted or delivered premat
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