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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2027 matches for " Collins JB "
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An online module series to prepare pharmacists to facilitate student engagement in patient-centered care delivery: development and evaluation
Kassam R, Kwong M, Collins JB
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S29922
Abstract: n online module series to prepare pharmacists to facilitate student engagement in patient-centered care delivery: development and evaluation Original Research (1554) Total Article Views Authors: Kassam R, Kwong M, Collins JB Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 61 - 71 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S29922 Received: 13 January 2012 Accepted: 02 April 2012 Published: 18 June 2012 Rosemin Kassam,1 Mona Kwong,1 John B Collins2 1Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Introduction: Accreditation bodies across North America have adopted revised standards that place increased emphasis on experiential education and preceptors to promote and demonstrate patient-centered, pharmaceutical care practices to students. Since such practices are still evolving, challenges exist in recruiting skilled preceptors who are prepared to provide such opportunities. An online educational module series titled "A Guide to Pharmaceutical Care" (The Guide) was developed and evaluated to facilitate this transition. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to describe the development of the modules; and (2) to present the evaluation results from its pilot testing. Methods: The Guide was developed as an online, self-directed training program. It begins by providing an overview of patient care (PC) philosophy and practice, and then discusses the tools that facilitate PC. It also provides a range of tips to support students as they provide PC during their experiential learning. Pharmacists participating in the pilot study were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling techniques. A pre–post quantitative survey with additional open-ended questions was used to evaluate the modules. Results: The modules incorporated a variety of teaching strategies: self-reflection exercises, quizzes to review important concepts, quick tips, flash cards, and video clips to illustrate more in-depth learning. Thirty-two pharmacists completed the pre–post assessment and reported significant increases in their confidence because of this training. The most influenced outcome was "Application of techniques to facilitate learning opportunities that enable pharmacy students to practice pharmaceutical care competencies." They also indicated that the training clarified necessary changes in their teaching techniques as well as increased their own practice skills. Conclusion: The study results indicated that a series of self-paced online modules with appropriate content improved the pharmacists' confidence to nurture students' experiential learning for PC practice as well as enhanced their PC knowledge and skills within their own practices.
Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery in community pharmacies
Kassam R, Collins JB, Berkowitz J
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S29606
Abstract: tient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery in community pharmacies Original Research (2880) Total Article Views Authors: Kassam R, Collins JB, Berkowitz J Published Date April 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 337 - 348 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S29606 Received: 31 December 2011 Accepted: 18 February 2012 Published: 18 April 2012 Rosemin Kassam1, John B Collins2, Jonathan Berkowitz3 1School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Education, 3Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Background: The purpose of this study was to validate previously published satisfaction scales in larger and more diversified patient populations; to expand the number of community pharmacies represented; to test the robustness of satisfaction measures across a broader demographic spectrum and a variety of health conditions; to confirm the three-factor scale structure; to test the relationships between satisfaction and consultation practices involving pharmacists and pharmacy students; and to examine service gaps and establish plausible norms. Methods: Patients completed a 15-question survey about their expectations regarding pharmaceutical care-related activities while shopping in any pharmacy and a parallel 15 questions about their experiences while shopping in this particular pharmacy. The survey also collected information regarding pharmaceutical care consultation received by the patients and brief demographic data. Results: A total of 628 patients from 55 pharmacies completed the survey. The pilot study’s three-factor satisfaction structure was confirmed. Overall, satisfaction measures did not differ by demographics or medical condition, but there were strong and significant store-to-store differences and consultation practice advantages when pharmacists or pharmacists-plus-students participated, but not for consultations with students alone. Conclusion: Patient satisfaction can be reliably measured by surveys structured around pharmaceutical care activities. The introduction of pharmaceutical care in pharmacies improves patient satisfaction. Service gap details indicated that pharmacy managers need to pay closer attention to various consultative activities involving patients and doctors.
Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery in community pharmacies
Kassam R,Collins JB,Berkowitz J
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012,
Abstract: Rosemin Kassam1, John B Collins2, Jonathan Berkowitz31School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Education, 3Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaBackground: The purpose of this study was to validate previously published satisfaction scales in larger and more diversified patient populations; to expand the number of community pharmacies represented; to test the robustness of satisfaction measures across a broader demographic spectrum and a variety of health conditions; to confirm the three-factor scale structure; to test the relationships between satisfaction and consultation practices involving pharmacists and pharmacy students; and to examine service gaps and establish plausible norms.Methods: Patients completed a 15-question survey about their expectations regarding pharmaceutical care-related activities while shopping in any pharmacy and a parallel 15 questions about their experiences while shopping in this particular pharmacy. The survey also collected information regarding pharmaceutical care consultation received by the patients and brief demographic data.Results: A total of 628 patients from 55 pharmacies completed the survey. The pilot study’s three-factor satisfaction structure was confirmed. Overall, satisfaction measures did not differ by demographics or medical condition, but there were strong and significant store-to-store differences and consultation practice advantages when pharmacists or pharmacists-plus-students participated, but not for consultations with students alone.Conclusion: Patient satisfaction can be reliably measured by surveys structured around pharmaceutical care activities. The introduction of pharmaceutical care in pharmacies improves patient satisfaction. Service gap details indicated that pharmacy managers need to pay closer attention to various consultative activities involving patients and doctors.Keywords: patient expectations, patient experiences, advanced pharmacy practice experience, medication management
An online module series to prepare pharmacists to facilitate student engagement in patient-centered care delivery: development and evaluation
Kassam R,Kwong M,Collins JB
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Rosemin Kassam,1 Mona Kwong,1 John B Collins21Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaIntroduction: Accreditation bodies across North America have adopted revised standards that place increased emphasis on experiential education and preceptors to promote and demonstrate patient-centered, pharmaceutical care practices to students. Since such practices are still evolving, challenges exist in recruiting skilled preceptors who are prepared to provide such opportunities. An online educational module series titled "A Guide to Pharmaceutical Care" (The Guide) was developed and evaluated to facilitate this transition. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to describe the development of the modules; and (2) to present the evaluation results from its pilot testing.Methods: The Guide was developed as an online, self-directed training program. It begins by providing an overview of patient care (PC) philosophy and practice, and then discusses the tools that facilitate PC. It also provides a range of tips to support students as they provide PC during their experiential learning. Pharmacists participating in the pilot study were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling techniques. A pre–post quantitative survey with additional open-ended questions was used to evaluate the modules.Results: The modules incorporated a variety of teaching strategies: self-reflection exercises, quizzes to review important concepts, quick tips, flash cards, and video clips to illustrate more in-depth learning. Thirty-two pharmacists completed the pre–post assessment and reported significant increases in their confidence because of this training. The most influenced outcome was "Application of techniques to facilitate learning opportunities that enable pharmacy students to practice pharmaceutical care competencies." They also indicated that the training clarified necessary changes in their teaching techniques as well as increased their own practice skills.Conclusion: The study results indicated that a series of self-paced online modules with appropriate content improved the pharmacists' confidence to nurture students' experiential learning for PC practice as well as enhanced their PC knowledge and skills within their own practices.Keywords: preceptor, clinical instructor, experiential, education, pharmaceutical care
Environmental stress upon hepatopancreatic cells of freshwater prawns (Decapoda: Caridea) from the floodplain of Paraná River  [PDF]
Pablo Collins
Natural Science (NS) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2010.27094
Abstract: In order to evaluate the influence of stressed environments on hepatopancreatic cells of fre- shwater prawns, Macrobachium borellii Nobili, 1896 and Palaemonetes argentinus Nobili 1901, (Crustacea, Decapoda, Palaemonidae) were collected at three different aquatic environments with different relationship to urban development in Argentina. Furthermore the effects of several cypermethryn concentration on hepa- topancreatic cell of M. borellii and P. argentinus were evaluated in a laboratory assays. The “N° 1” lake (Santa Fe Argentina) which is more affected by the anthropogenic pressure and “Don Felipe” lake which is still not strongly by human activities were the studied sites from the floodplain of Paraná river. While Alejandra lake was the intermedia effects sites. Different damaged ultra-structures were found in F- and R-cells of prawns in the stressed lake. The predominant features were: disrupted the microvillous border, swelled mitochondria, reduction of endoplasmic reticulum, dyctiosomes, glycoproteins, desna-turalization of vacuole membrane and premature autolysis. Moreover the F-cell number was higher in the environment near to city than in the others sites. Similar effects were observed in the cypermethryn assays. The observations clearly indicate that the ultrastructure of midgut gland in the both palaemonids varies depending on the site from which animals are collected and the biocid presence. So, in this case it can be stated that the hepatopancreas histology of fre- shwater prawns is a good tool to monitor the impact of a stressed environment upon freshwater prawns.
The use of oxygen consumption as an indicator of energy assimilation in full sib groups of rainbow trout
JB Kinghorn
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1980, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-12-4-422c
Abstract:
The effect of ACTH on parturition as defence mechanism stimulator in sows
JB Ludvigsen
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1982, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-14-1-99a
Abstract:
Selection for prolificacy in the Cambridge sheep
JB Owen
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1982, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-14-4-579c
Abstract:
The development of a prolific breed of sheep
JB Owen
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1977, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-9-1-128b
Abstract:
Scientific and Technological Skills Acquisition at the Primary School Level as a Strategy to Mitigating the Challenges of Vision 2020 in Nigeria
JB Nbina
African Research Review , 2011,
Abstract: Primary science is the foundation on which subsequent science teaching and learning at the secondary and tertiary levels of education is built. The low number of graduates in science and technology from the higher institution that are independent, or self reliant shows that there is low or no skills teaching in science and technology, which have generated a lot of concern .the world is continuously being reduced to a global village due to science and technology. There is therefore need to mobilize as many pupils as possible and the teacher as well to learn and teach science skills. This paper therefore highlights the interest and different skills which are imperative for pupils in science and technology. It discusses strategies for skills acquisition, how to demonstrate such skills, how to motivate learners to acquire science and technological skills, and how to help learners practice the new skills acquired. Recommendations are given on how the primary school teacher can get involved in the crusade that skill is imperative for pupils in science and technology.
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