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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1421 matches for " Citrus aurantium "
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Interaction of Flomazenil with Anxiolytic Effects of Citrus aurantium L. Essential Oil on Male Mice  [PDF]
Leila Adibi, Maryam Khosravi, Shahrzad Khakpour, Hedayat Sahraei, Mahsa Hadipour Jahromy
Pharmacology & Pharmacy (PP) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/pp.2015.62006
Abstract: Due to our previous findings about the role of GABAegic neurotransmission in anxiolytic effects of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil, we are now presenting flomazenil interaction with this herb, as an antagonist of benzodiazepines at GABA receptor. The study was performed on 84 male albino mice assigned to 14 groups of six. The animals were injected intraperitoneally with the Citrus aurantium L. essential oil for 5 days. On the fifth day, either normal saline or flomazenil (0.1 mg/kg) was injected to the experimental groups. Thirty minutes after the injection, all the groups were assessed for anxiety-related behavior by elevated plus-maze test. In groups receiving Citrus aurantium L. essential oil at doses of 2.5 and 5 percent, the time spent in the open arms increased significantly (P < 0.001). The injection of flumazenil alone induced anxiety quite clearly observed by decreasing the time or number of entries in open arms. As an antagonist of benzodiazepines at GABA receptor, flomazenil acted as a competitive antagonist for Citrus aurantium L. essential oil regarding the increment in the number of entries to the open arms and the time spent in the open arms (P < 0.001) compared to flumazenil. It can then be concluded that Citrus aurantium L. essential oil induces its anxiolytic effects like benzodiazepines, in the same site at GABA receptor.
IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF LEAVES, FRUITS AND PEEL EXTRACTS OF CITRUS
Muthiah PL
International Journal of Phytopharmacy , 2012, DOI: 10.7439/ijpp.v2i1.293
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating the antioxidant activities of the leaves, fruits and peel extracts of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon belonging to the family Rutaceae. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activities of the hydroethanolic extracts have been evaluated by using different in vitro assays and the results were compared with the standard antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), ascorbic acid, curcumin, quercetin, etc. In addition, total phenolic and flavonoid contents in these extracts were determined as pyrocatechol and quercetin equivalents respectively. Among the extracts assayed, 4 extracts (leaf and peel extracts of C.aurantium , peel and fruit extracts of C.limetta) had effective H donor ability, reducing power ability, metal chelating activity, superoxide anion radical, nitric oxide radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities. The antioxidant activity depends upon concentration and increased with increasing amount of the extracts. The free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities may be attributed to the presence of phenolic and flavonoid compounds present in the extracts. Result: The results obtained in the present study indicate that the leaves, fruits and peel of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon serve as the potential source of natural antioxidants. Keywords: Antioxidant; Citrus aurantium; Citrus limetta; Citrus limon; free radical; Rutaceae.
In vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of leaves, fruits and peel extracts of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon
Muthiah PL
International Journal of Phytopharmacy , 2012, DOI: 10.7439/ijpp.v2i3.434
Abstract: Aim of the study: To evaluate the in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the extract of leaves, fruits and peel of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon. Materials and Methods: Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically under aerobic conditions and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295nm associated with uric acid formation. Results: Among the extracts tested, the C.limetta peel extract exhibited highest potency of xanthine oxidase inhibition (IC50 40.16 ±0.88 g/ml). This was followed by C.aurantium peel (IC50 51.50 ±2.05 g/ml), C.limon peel (IC50 64.90 ±1.24 g/ml), C.aurantium leaf (IC5073.50 ±1.26 g/ml), C.limetta leaf (IC50 74.83 ±2.42 g/ml), C.limon leaf (IC50 76.83 ±2.02 g/ml), C.limetta fruit (IC50 95.16 ±0.60 g/ml) extracts compared with the IC50 value of standard allopurinol was 6.6 g/ml. Conclusion: Recent findings show that the occurrence of gout is increasing worldwide, possibly due to the changes in dietary habits like intake of food rich in nucleic acids, such as meat, sea foods, etc. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors such as allopurinol is the drug of choice, however it has been observed more side effects. An alternative to allopurinol is the use of medicinal plants, We thus began our program to look for xanthine oxidase inhibitors of phytochemical origin. In conclusion, the study suggests that the leaves and peel extracts of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon possess xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity that might be helpful in preventing or slowing the progress of gout and related disorders.
Indu??o e cultivo in vitro de gemas adventícias em segmentos de epicótilo de laranja-azeda
Silva, Rosely Pereira da;Mendes, Beatriz Madalena Januzzi;Mour?o Filho, Francisco de Assis Alves;
Pesquisa Agropecuária Brasileira , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-204X2008001000011
Abstract: the objective of this work was to evaluate the induction and formation of adventitious buds in sour orange explants through the use of plant regulators. in vitro organogenesis experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of bap, tdz, and kin in different concentrations and under two light conditions; bap and kin, combined or not with naa; bap and kin, separately or in combined concentrations. sour orange epicotyl segments (1 cm length), from in vitro germinated plants, were used as explants. in order to induce bud formation, the explants were cultured in mt medium with or without the addition of plant regulators. the material was cultivated at 27oc in the absence of light for 30 days, followed of culture under a 16-hour photoperiod. the experimental design was completely randomized, with four or five replicates, depending on the experiment; each replicate comprised one petri dish with 20 explants. after 60 or 70 days of cultivation, the percentage of responsive explants and the number of buds were evaluated. the addition of bap to the culture medium, combined or not with ana, and in combinations with cin, induces better organogenic response.
Sour orange bud regeneration and in vitro plant development related to culture medium composition and explant type
Silva, Rosely Pereira da;Souza, Amancio José de;Mendes, Beatriz Madalena Januzzi;Mour?o Filho, Francisco de Assis Alves;
Revista Brasileira de Fruticultura , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-29452010005000022
Abstract: in order to evaluate the formation of adventitious buds and in vitro regeneration of sour orange plants (citrus aurantium l.) two organogenesis-inducing experiments were conducted. in the first experiment, the induction and in vitro regeneration of adventitious buds were tested on epicotyl and internodal segments under the influence of bap or kin associated with naa. the second experiment evaluated the in vitro regeneration of sour orange plants related to different explant types (epicotyls segments, internodal segments of in vitro germinated plantlets and internodal segments of greenhouse cultivated plants). data collected on both experiments included the percentage of responsive explants (explants that formed buds), and the number of buds per explant. the addition of bap showed the best organogenic response. in vitro germinated epicotyl segments and internodal segments are recommended as explants for sour orange in vitro organogenesis. rooting of regenerated shoots was achieved without the need of auxin in the medium.
Antispasmodic effects of Citrus aurantium flowers aqueous extract on uterus of non-pregnant rats
Akram Ahangarpour,Ali Akbar Oroojan,Ashraf Amirzargar,Maryam Ghanavati
Iranian Journal of Reproductive Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: Background: Citrus aurantium is a small citrus tree, with scented white flowers. The C. aurantium is used in Asian herbal medicine primarily to treat digestive problems.Objective: The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of C. aurantium flower's aqueous extract on uterine contraction in presence of some known uterus stimulants.Materials and Methods: In experimental study 30 virgin Wistar rats 200-300gr were obtained. After laparatomy, a piece of Uterus was dissected out and mounted in an organ bath (10ml) containing De Jalon (29°C) and contracted by KCl (60mM), oxytocin (10mU/ml) and barium chloride (4mM) then the effect of C. aurantium flower's aqueous extract (1-8 mg/ml) on the uterine contractions was investigated. Uterus was separately incubated with propranolol (1 M), naloxone (1 M) and the role of β-adrenoceptors, opioid receptors were evaluated.Results: Cumulative concentrations of the extract (1-8 mg/ml) decreased KCl, oxytocin and barium chloride induced uterine contractions, dose-dependently (p<0.001). C. aurantium flower's aqueous extract was unaffected on incubation the tissue with propranolol and naloxone.Conclusion: It seems that the extract induced antispasmodic effect mainly via calcium influx blockade. However, neither β-adrenoceptors nor opioid receptors were involved. Since the extract has antispasmodic effect on uterus contraction therefore we can suggest that more study will be necessary to relief dysmenorrheal
Effect of Citrus aurantium L. Essential Oil and Its Interaction with Fluoxetine on Anxiety in Male Mice  [PDF]
Sorin Saketi, Maryam Bananej, Mahsa Hadipour Jahromy
Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science (JBBS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbbs.2014.47029
Abstract: Anxiety is a very common mental disorder among neurological diseases. Some herbs have soothing effects and play an important role in reducing anxiety. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil on anxiety and its interference with serotonergic pathway. Sixty male mice were assigned into control, sham (saline and olive oil), and experimental groups. Intraperitoneal injection of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil was applied at doses of 0.5, 2.5, and 5 percent for 5 days. In another set of experiments, after intraperitoneal injection of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil at doses of 0.5, 2.5, and 5 percent for 5 days, on the 5th day, 30 minutes before applying essential oil, fluoxetine (2 mg/kg) was injected. Then, the anxiety-related behavior was assessed using elevated plus maze test. The results revealed that injection of essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. alone or along with fluoxetine led to increasing the number of entries into the open arms and the time spent in open arms that was significantly different compared with control and sham groups (P < 0.001). Besides, further effects revealed when fluoxetine added to essential oils, however no more effects obtained when compared to fluoxetine alone. It is concluded that Citrus aurantium L. essential oil can reduce the anxiety in male mice and due to fluoxetin potentiation and maximum response observed, the herb may express its anxiolytic effects in part, via serotonergic system.
A Study of the Effect of Citrus aurantium L. Essential Oil on Anxiety and Its Interaction with GABAergic Pathways in Male Mice  [PDF]
Maryam Khosravi, Shahrzad Khakpour, Leila Adibi, Mahsa Hadipour Jahromy
Journal of Behavioral and Brain Science (JBBS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbbs.2014.410046
Abstract: Anxiety is among the most common disorders affecting a great number of people. Different neurotransmitter systems, such as GABAergic system, play an important role in emergence of anxiety-related behaviors. In this study, we have investigated the effect of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil on anxiety and its interaction with GABAergic pathways. Male mice were assigned into control, sham, and experimental groups. Intraperitoneal injection of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil was applied at doses of 0.5, 2.5, and 5 percent for 5 days. Diazepam (0.1 mg/kg) was injected on the fifth day, thirty minutes before applying Citrus aurantium L. essential oil. The anxiety-related behavior of mice was then assessed using elevated plus-maze test. In groups receiving Citrus aurantium L. essential oil at doses of 2.5 and 5 percent, the percent time spent in the open arms increased significantly (P < 0.001). The injection of diazepam alone or with Citrus aurantium L. essential oil resulted in increasing in the number of entries to the open arms and the percent time spent in the open arms (P < 0.001). The results of this study show that Citrus aurantium L. essential oil can reduce anxiety-related behaviors in male mice thah may act via GABAergic system.
Effect of Citrus aurantium L. Essential Oil and Haloperidol on Anxiety in Male Mice  [PDF]
Shahrzad Khakpour, Maryam Khosravi, Zahra Mashayekhipour, Mahsa Hadipour Jahromy
World Journal of Neuroscience (WJNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjns.2014.45047
Abstract: Relationship between sociability and the amount of brain’s dopamine is very well known. In this study, we have examined the effect of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil on anxiety and its interaction with dopaminergic pathways. 70 male mice were assigned into experimental, control, and sham groups. Essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. was injected intraperitonealy at doses of 0.5%, 2.5% and 5% for 5 days. Subcutaneous injection of haloperidol was administered on the fifth day, 30 minutes before the injection of the essential oil. The anxiety-related behavior of mice was then assessed by elevated plus-maze test. The result of this study showed that the injection of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil at doses of 2.5% and 5% increased significantly the time spent in the open arms (OAT) (p < 0.001), also there was a significant increase in the number of entries into the open arms (OAE). Injection of different doses of the essential oil along with haloperidol significantly increased OAT (p < 0.001(. The results demonstrate that the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. along with haloperidol medication reduces anxiety-related behaviors.
Thermogenic Effect from Nutritionally Enriched Coffee Consumption
Jay R Hoffman, Jie Kang, Nicholas A Ratamess, Peter F Jennings, Gerald Mangine, Avery D Faigenbaum
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1550-2783-3-1-35
Abstract: Ten subjects (8 male, 2 female; 20.9 ± 1.7 y; 178.1 ± 10.4 cm; 71.8 ± 12.1 kg) underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory after at least 3-h post-absorptive state and were provided either 354 ml (1.5 cups) of freshly brewed JF or commercially available caffeinated coffee (P). Subjects then rested in a semi-recumbent position for three hours. VO2 and HR were determined every 5 min during the first 30 min and every 10 min during the next 150 min. BP was determined every 15 min during the first 30 min and every 30 min thereafter. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis was computed for VO2, whereas a session-average was calculated for RER, HR and BP.Initial analysis revealed no significant differences. However, seven of the ten subjects were considered responders to JF (had a higher AUC for VO2during JF than P). Statistical analysis showed the difference between JF and P (12%) to be significantly different in these responders. In addition, the average systolic BP was higher (p < 0.05) in JF (118 ± 7 mmHg) than P (115 ± 8 mmHg) in both the total sample and the subgroup of responders. No differences in average HR and average diastolic BP were observed between JF and P in both the total sample and the subgroup of responders.It appears that consuming a nutritionally-enriched coffee beverage may increase resting energy expenditure in individuals that are sensitive to the caffeine and herbal coffee supplement. In addition, this supplement also appears to affect cardiovascular dynamics by augmenting systolic arterial blood pressure.Caffeine supplementation has been suggested to enhance lipolysis, fat oxidation and reduce glycogen breakdown [1,2]. However, when caffeine is combined with a herbal supplement the combination appears to be more effective for enhancing metabolic rates than consuming caffeine alone [3,4]. Most studies have examined the combination of caf
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