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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2517 matches for " Chicken meat "
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Shrinkage and Density Change of De-Boned Chicken Breast during Deep-Fat Frying  [PDF]
Lamin S. Kassama, Michael Ngadi
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2016.710089
Abstract: The effects of frying oil temperature (FOT) and time on densities and shrinkage in chicken breast meat during deep-fat frying were investigated. De-boned Chicken breast samples were diced and fried at different FOT (170℃, 180℃, and 190℃) in an industrial fryer for periods varying from 5 to 900 s. Bulk and apparent densities were determined with a fluid displacement pycnometer, and fat analysis was conducted using soxhlet extraction with petroleum ether solvent. The physical structure of chicken meat changed significantly with the frying time and FOT (P < 0.001). Bulk density was 1.15 g/cm3 in the raw product and decreased to 0.98, 0.95, and 0.93 g/cm3 after 900 s of deep-frying at 170℃, 180℃ and 190℃, respectively. Similarly, apparent density changed from 1.13 to 1.25, 1.24 and 1.22 g/cm3 and moisture loss was linearly correlated with both densities. Volumetric shrinkage was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the process variables and hence a linear correlation also existed with moisture loss. The rates of shrinkage were 0.013, 0.001, and 0.008/s and occurred rapidly during the first 90s of FOT (170℃, 180℃, and 190℃), respectively and decreased as frying time increased.
Feasibility Study of Flotation Process in Separating Chicken from Chicken Skeleton  [PDF]
Erqing Jin, Cong Peng, Shun Liao, Jianzhong Wu
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2016.714125
Abstract: An innovative and effective method of separating chicken meat and bone from chicken skeleton was developed in this study. Different heating approaches to chicken skeleton were compared to optimize cooking conditions including cooking temperature and cooking time. The separation efficiency of chicken meat and bone in different conditions, including flow direction, impeller speed and the liquid level rising velocity were also studied. Experimental results demonstrated high temperature cooking and assisted mechanical stirring could improve separating rate of chicken skeleton. Liquid flow entering at tangent entrance direction of the kettle could maintain the stability of the liquid level and smoothness of the separation process. The outflow rate of chicken meat increased as the liquid level rising velocity raised, and approached to the maximum value at 0.80 cm/s. The practical application test showed that the best conditions for separation of chicken skeleton were: 45 min cooking time at 114°C; tangent flow direction; stir speed of 200 r/min; the liquid level rising velocity of water is 0.8 cm/s. Using this approach, the value of chicken bone was increased, product specialization was enhanced, and the results could be used in future high value chicken product development.
Antibiotic Resistance and Potential Pathogenicity of an Isolate Salmonella enterica enterica Based on Genomic Comparison with of 103 and 2199 Strains Obtained from Contaminated Chicken Meat in Mexico  [PDF]
Renaud Condé, Pérez de la Rosa Diego, Lozano Luis, Hernández Salgado Homero, Rocha-Martínez Karina, Rojas-Ramírez E. Edmundo, Sachman-Ruiz Bernardo
Advances in Microbiology (AiM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/aim.2018.87031
Abstract: The strategies implemented to identify pathogenic strains of Salmonella in countries with high production and consumption when is of chicken meat [such as Mexico), successfully bring germ-free meat to the market. Two Salmonella enterica enterica strains obtained from Mexican chicken meat were completely sequenced. The genomic comparison with the CT18 Salmonella strain indicates that strains 103 and 2199 vary by 1.9%. Genome analysis of the isolated strains revealed the presence of numerous virulence genes, as well as antibiotics resistance genes in these two isolates. Their potential pathogenicity was inferred from presence of 22 (103 strains) and 19 genes (2199 strains) homologous to the one annotated in Salmonella enterica virulome databanks. The characterization of these strains will contribute to successful Salmonella monitoring in Mexico.
Caracteriza??o do consumidor de carne de frango da cidade de Porto Alegre
Francisco, Dione Carina;Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro do;Loguercio, Andrea Pinto;Camargo, Luciane;
Ciência Rural , 2007, DOI: 10.1590/S0103-84782007000100041
Abstract: the concern with the alimentary security has changed the form as the consumers see the meaty products; searching information on the foods that consume. in this direction, this research was aimed at characterizing the chicken meat consumer of porto alegre, brazil. they had been interviewed 393 consumers during the period of april the july of 2004. the results demonstrate that the chicken meat is the second preferred meat of the consumers, and that the empanados cuts and of chicken are the most consumed products. the consumers believe that the bird flu and salmonelose are the main illnesses propagated by this meat.
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Salmonella in artificially inoculated chicken meat
SANTOS, Luciana Ruschel dos;NASCIMENTO, Vladimir Pinheiro do;OLIVEIRA, Sílvia Dias de;FLORES, Maristela Lovato;PONTES, Alexandre Pontes;RIBEIRO, Aldemir Reginato;SALLE, Carlos Tadeu Pippi;LOPES, Rui Fernando Félix;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46652001000500002
Abstract: the aim of this study was to develop a polymerase chain reaction (pcr) protocol for the detection of salmonella in artificially contaminated chicken meat. tests were performed with different dilutions of salmonella typhimurium or salmonella enteritidis cells (10-7, 10-8 or 10-9 cfu/ml) inoculated in chicken meat samples, in order to establish the limits of detection, incubation times (0, 6, 8 and 24 hours of pre-enrichment in pbw 1%) and three dna extraction protocols (phenol-chloroform, thermal treatment and thermal treatment and sephaglass). the assay was able to detect until 10-9 cfu/ml of initial dilution of salmonella cells inoculated in chicken meat, which allows detection of salmonella within 48 hours, including 24 hours of pre-enrichment and using the phenol-chloroform dna extraction protocol. as the results are obtained in a shorter time period than that of microbiological culture, this procedure will be useful in the methodology for detection of salmonella in chicken.
Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Salmonella in artificially inoculated chicken meat
SANTOS Luciana Ruschel dos,NASCIMENTO Vladimir Pinheiro do,OLIVEIRA Sílvia Dias de,FLORES Maristela Lovato
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2001,
Abstract: The aim of this study was to develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the detection of Salmonella in artificially contaminated chicken meat. Tests were performed with different dilutions of Salmonella Typhimurium or Salmonella Enteritidis cells (10-7, 10-8 or 10-9 CFU/mL) inoculated in chicken meat samples, in order to establish the limits of detection, incubation times (0, 6, 8 and 24 hours of pre-enrichment in PBW 1%) and three DNA extraction protocols (phenol-chloroform, thermal treatment and thermal treatment and Sephaglass). The assay was able to detect until 10-9 CFU/mL of initial dilution of Salmonella cells inoculated in chicken meat, which allows detection of Salmonella within 48 hours, including 24 hours of pre-enrichment and using the phenol-chloroform DNA extraction protocol. As the results are obtained in a shorter time period than that of microbiological culture, this procedure will be useful in the methodology for detection of Salmonella in chicken.
Comparison between the Quality Traits of Phosphate and Bicarbonate-Marinated Chicken Breast Fillets Cooked under Different Heat Treatments  [PDF]
Samer Mudalal, Massimiliano Petracci, Silvia Tappi, Pietro Rocculi, Claudio Cavani
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2014.51005
Abstract:

Because the use of phosphates has being recently diminished in meat industry due to the nutritional drawbacks of phosphates, some researchers started to evaluate sodium bicarbonate as phosphate replacer in meat products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different temperature combinations of dry air-cooking treatments (Air and Core temperatures: 160 - 76, 160 - 80, 200 - 76 and 200℃ - 80℃, respectively) on chemical composition, texture properties, water activity, freezable water and bound water, color, pH, and water binding capacity of phosphate and bicarbonate-marinated chicken breast. A batch of 24 h post-mortem broiler breast meat of 80 fillets was divided into two groups of marination treatments (0.3% sodium bicarbonate n = 40, 0.3% sodium tripolyphosphate n = 40) and was vacuum tumbled (45 min, ?0.95 mbar, 20 rpm). Different temperature-combinations cooking treatments significantly modified the chemical composition. Bicarbonate marinated fillets showed higher ability to retain water (67.3% vs. 65.7%, P < 0.05) during severe heat treatment and lower cook losses (30.7% vs. 33.4%, P < 0.05) when compared with phosphate-marinated fillets. The effect of changing the cooking temperatures on Texture Profile Analysis (hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess, springiness, and chewiness) was more tangible in phosphate marinated fillets than bicarbonate. Bicarbonate-marinated fillets showed significant differences in the percentage of bound water, latent heat, and water activity after cooking in comparison to phosphate-marinated fillets. The results of this study revealed that phosphate-marinated fillets interacted with heat treatments in different patterns in comparison with bicarbonate-marinated fillets.

Relationship between Oil Uptake and Moisture Loss during Deep Fat Frying of Deboned Chicken Breast Meat  [PDF]
Lamin S. Kassama, Michael Ngadi
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science (ACES) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/aces.2016.64033
Abstract: The relationship between moisture loss and oil uptake at different combination of Frying Oil Temperatures (FOT) and time during deep-fat frying of chicken meat was investigated in this study. Chicken meat samples were diced and fried at different FOT (170°C, 180°C, and 190°C) in an industrial fryer for periods varying from 5 to 900 s. Fat analysis was accomplished in a soxhlet extraction apparatus with petroleum ether solvent. Prior to fat analysis samples were freeze dried and the moisture analysis was based on the standard AOAC standard method. The results show that a cook value of 415 s was found to give the most ideal sensory characteristics. The relationship between moisture loss and oil uptake during the initial phase of frying (<45 s) was erratic and appeared to be independent of frying oil temperature. A linear correlation existed (r = 0.97) between moisture loss and frying time. Oil uptake was positively correlated to moisture loss in the range of frying times 45 s to about 600 s. After 600 s, oil uptake tended to equilibrate while moisture loss continued in the quasi-equilibrium state. The relationship between moisture loss and oil uptake is an important phenomenon in the context of characterizing the physical properties of fried product. The rate of oil uptake was 1.64 and 1.74 g/s for the FOT 180°C and 190°C, respectively, and the rate (1.35 g/s) at FOT 170°C was significantly (P < 0.05) lower.
Salmonella spp. em carca?as, carne mecanicamente separada, lingüi?as e cortes comerciais de frango
Carvalho, Angela Cleusa de Fátima Banzatto de;Cortez, Ana Lígia Lordello;
Ciência Rural , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0103-84782005000600040
Abstract: food of animal origin represents an important role in the epidemiology of human salmonellosis. in spite of the technological improvement, the chicken meat is subjected to bacterial contamination, mainly by microorganisms of the genus salmonella that can be found in the intestinal tract or elsewhere on the chicken body. the aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of salmonella in chicken meat and cuts from the northeast region of s?o paulo state, brazil. by conventional cultivation microbiological methods, 45 samples of carcasses, 60 samples of mechanically deboned meat (mdm), 25 samples of chicken sausages, 20 samples of chest, and 15 samples of chicken leg and thigh. salmonella was found in 13.3% (6/45) of the carcass, 25% (15/60) of the mdm, 16% (4/25) of the sausages, 30% (6/20) of the chests and 13.3% (2/15) of the tight analysed. the results showed that 33 (20%) out of 165 samples were contaminated by salmonella. therefore, these samples were inappropriate for consumption, according to the brazilian legislation.
Qualidade da carne de marreco pequim branco (Anas Platyrhynchos platyrhynchos L. 1758) comparado a frango de corte
Faria, Peter Bitencourt;Vicente Neto, Jo?o;Bressan, Maria Cristina;Mesquita, Fabrício Rivelli;Tavares, Sandra Aparecida;Gama, Luis Telo da;
Ciência e Agrotecnologia , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-70542008000100031
Abstract: twenty refrigerated carcasses (10 peking mallard and 10 broiler chicken) were submitted to analyses of chemical composition, cholesterol, colour (cie l*a*b* system), weight loss by cooking (ppc) and shear force (fc). mallard meat had lower (p<0.05) humidity in both leg and breast (71.77 and 74.53%, respectively) when compared with chicken meat (74.73 and 76.07%, respectively). when different cuts were compared, the breast had a higher (p<0.05) humidity and protein content than the leg in both species. mallard leg and breast had lower (p<0.05) lightness (37.59 and 35.75, respectively) and higher red content (18.48 and 20.67, respectively), than the lightness (40.98 and 45.18, respectively) and red content (10.02 and 5.52, respectively) observed in chicken. the fc was higher (p<0.05) in mallard breast (4.90 kgf) than in chicken breast (2.63 kgf). meat from white peking mallard is darker and with a stronger red pigment than meat from broiler chicken. even though it is less tender than meat from broiler chicken, mallard meat still has an acceptable tenderness.
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