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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 101184 matches for " Chia-Yuan Liu "
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Computer Tomography and Ultrasonography Image Registration Based on the Cooperation of GPU and CPU  [PDF]
Ying-Chih Lin, Chien-Liang Huang, Chin-Sheng Chen, Wen-Chung Chang, Yu-Jen Chen, Chia-Yuan Liu
Journal of Signal and Information Processing (JSIP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jsip.2013.43B014
Abstract:

Image registration is wildly used in the biomedical image, but there are too many textures and noises in the biomedical image to get a precise image registration. In order to get the excellent registration performance, it needs more complex image processing, and it will spend expensive computation cost. For the real time issue, this paper proposes edge gradient direction image registration applied to Computer Tomography(CT) image and Ultrasonography (US) image based on the cooperation of Graphic Processor Unit (GPU) and Central Processor Unit (CPU). GPU can significantly reduce the computation time. First, the CT image slice is extracted from the CT volume by the region growing and the interpolation algorithm. Secondly, the image pre-processing is employed to reduce the image noises and enhance the image features. There are two kinds of the image pre-processing algorithms invoked in this paper: 1) median filtering and 2) anisotropic diffusion. Last but not least, the image edge gradient information is obtained by Canny operator, and the similarity measurement based on gradient direction is employed to evaluate the similarity between the CT and the US images. The experimental results show that the proposed architecture can distinctively improve the efficiency and are more suitably applied to the real world.

Training gastroenterology fellows to perform gastric polypectomy using a novel ex vivo model
Ming-Jen Chen,Ching-Chung Lin,Chia-Yuan Liu,Chih-Jen Chen
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2011, DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i41.4619
Abstract: AIM: To evaluate the effect of hands-on training of gastroenterology fellows in gastric polypectomy using an ex vivo simulator. METHODS: Eight gastroenterology fellows at Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei were evaluated in gastric polypectomy techniques using a pig stomach with artificial polyps created by a rubber band ligation device. The performance of four second year (year-2) fellows who had undergone one year of clinical training was compared with that of four first year (year-1) fellows both before and after a 4-h workshop using the ex vivo simulator. The workshop allowed for hands-on training in the removal of multiple artificial polyps and the placement of hemoclips at the excision site. Evaluation included observation of technical skills, procedure time, and the fellows’ confidence scale. RESULTS: One week after the workshop, the year-1 fellows were re-evaluated and had significantly improved mean performance scores (from 17.9 ± 1.8 to 22.5 ± 0.7), confidence scale (from 4.5 ± 1.0 to 7.8 ± 0.5) and procedure time (from 615.0 ± 57.4 s to 357.5 ± 85.0 s) compared with their baseline performance. After 4 h of training using the ex vivo simulator, the skills of the year-1 fellows were statistically similar to those of the year-2 fellows. CONCLUSION: Use of this ex vivo simulator significantly improved the endoscopic gastric polypectomy skills of gastroenterology fellows who had not had previous clinical training in gastric polypectomy.
Training gastroenterology fellows to perform gastric polypectomy using a novel ex vivo model
Ming-Jen Chen,Ching-Chung Lin,Chia-Yuan Liu,Chih-Jen Chen
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2011, DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i41.4679
Abstract: AIM: To evaluate the effect of hands-on training of gastroenterology fellows in gastric polypectomy using an ex vivo simulator. METHODS: Eight gastroenterology fellows at Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei were evaluated in gastric polypectomy techniques using a pig stomach with artificial polyps created by a rubber band ligation device. The performance of four second year (year-2) fellows who had undergone one year of clinical training was compared with that of four first year (year-1) fellows both before and after a 4-h workshop using the ex vivo simulator. The workshop allowed for hands-on training in the removal of multiple artificial polyps and the placement of hemoclips at the excision site. Evaluation included observation of technical skills, procedure time, and the fellows’ confidence scale. RESULTS: One week after the workshop, the year-1 fellows were re-evaluated and had significantly improved mean performance scores (from 17.9 ± 1.8 to 22.5 ± 0.7), confidence scale (from 4.5 ± 1.0 to 7.8 ± 0.5) and procedure time (from 615.0 ± 57.4 s to 357.5 ± 85.0 s) compared with their baseline performance. After 4 h of training using the ex vivo simulator, the skills of the year-1 fellows were statistically similar to those of the year-2 fellows. CONCLUSION: Use of this ex vivo simulator significantly improved the endoscopic gastric polypectomy skills of gastroenterology fellows who had not had previous clinical training in gastric polypectomy.
CYTOTOXIC CONSTITUENTS FROM THE ROOT WOOD OF FORMOSAN MICHELIA COMPRESSA
CHIA-YUAN LIU,YANG-WEN CHEN,MING-JEN CHENG,SHOIW-JU LEE
Journal of the Chilean Chemical Society , 2008,
Abstract: The methanolic extract of the root wood of Michelia compressa (Maxim.) Sargent showed cytotoxicity against MCF-7, NCI-H460 and SF-268 cancer cell lines. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform-soluble layer led to the isolation of costunohde and liriodenine with cytotoxic activities, along with the isolation of twenty-seven known compounds. The active costunohde existed as major constituent in this study.
Mechanism and kinetics of phase formation of cobalt oxyhydrates (Na,K)x(H2O)yCoO2-delta synthesized using aqueous permanganate solution route
Chia-Jyi Liu,Wen-Chin Hung,Chia-Yuan Liao,Jung-Sheng Wang,Hwo-Shuenn Sheu
Physics , 2006,
Abstract: This paper has been withdrawn by the author due to a data error in Fig 5.
Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Mediates the Unfavorable Systemic Impact of Local Irradiation on Pharmacokinetics of Anti-Cancer Drug 5-Fluorouracil
Chen-Hsi Hsieh,Chia-Yuan Liu,Yen-Ju Hsieh,Hung-Chi Tai,Li-Ying Wang,Tung-Hu Tsai,Yu-Jen Chen
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021000
Abstract: Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely accepted for cancer treatment. However, the interactions between radiation and 5-FU remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the influence of local irradiation on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in rats. The single-fraction radiation was delivered to the whole pelvic fields of Sprague-Dawley rats after computerized tomography-based planning. 5-FU at 100 mg/kg was prescribed 24 hours after radiation. A high-performance liquid chromatography system was used to measure 5-FU in the blood. Matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) inhibitor I was administered to examine whether or not RT modulation of 5-FU pharmacokinetic parameters could be blocked. Compared with sham-irradiated controls, whole pelvic irradiation reduced the area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of 5-FU in plasma and, in contrast, increased in bile with a radiation dose-dependent manner. Based on protein array analysis, the amount of plasma MMP-8 was increased by whole pelvic irradiation (2.8-fold by 0.5 Gy and 5.3-fold by 2 Gy) in comparison with controls. Pretreatment with MMP-8 inhibitor reversed the effect of irradiation on AUC of 5-FU in plasma. Our findings first indicate that local irradiation modulate the systemic pharmacokinetics of 5-FU through stimulating the release of MMP-8. The pharmacokinetics of 5-FU during concurrent chemoradiaiton therapy should be rechecked and the optimal 5-FU dose should be reevaluated, and adjusted if necessary, during CCRT.
Costunolide causes mitotic arrest and enhances radiosensitivity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells
Chia-Yuan Liu, Hsun-Shuo Chang, Ih-Sheng Chen, Chih-Jen Chen, Ming-Ling Hsu, Shu-Ling Fu, Yu-Jen Chen
Radiation Oncology , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1748-717x-6-56
Abstract: The assessment used in this study included: cell viability assay, cell cycle analysis by DNA histogram, expression of phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10) by flow cytometer, mitotic index by Liu's stain and morphological observation, mitotic spindle alignment by immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin, expression of cell cycle-related proteins by Western blotting, and radiation survival by clonogenic assay.Our results show that costunolide reduced the viability of HA22T/VGH cells. It caused a rapid G2/M arrest at 4 hours shown by DNA histogram. The increase in phosphorylated histone H3 (Ser 10)-positive cells and mitotic index indicates costunolide-treated cells are arrested at mitosis, not G2, phase. Immunofluorescence of alpha-tubulin for spindle formation further demonstrated these cells are halted at metaphase. Costunolide up-regulated the expression of phosphorylated Chk2 (Thr 68), phosphorylated Cdc25c (Ser 216), phosphorylated Cdk1 (Tyr 15) and cyclin B1 in HA22T/VGH cells. At optimal condition causing mitotic arrest, costunolide sensitized HA22T/VGH HCC cells to ionizing radiation with sensitizer enhancement ratio up to 1.9.Costunolide could reduce the viability and arrest cell cycling at mitosis in hepatoma cells. Logical exploration of this mitosis-arresting activity for cancer therapeutics shows costunolide enhanced the killing effect of radiotherapy against human HCC cells.Costunolide is a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Michelia compressa in our previous work [1]. Michelia compressa is a common origin of wooden furniture used worldwide. Costunolide has been also identified in several species of plants, including Saussurea lappa C.B. Clarke [2], Aucklandia lappa Decne [3], Laurus nobilis [4], Magnolia grandiflora [5] and Michelia floribunda [6]. Bocca et al reported that costunolide interfered with the microtubule proteins [7]. However, whether this activity refers to mitosis arrest and subsequent applications for cancer therapy, such as radiosensitizing e
Oral Glutamine Supplement Inhibits Ascites Formation in Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Mouse Model
Ming-Jen Chen,Tsang-En Wang,Shu-Jung Tsai,Ching-Chung Lin,Chia-Yuan Liu,Horng-Yuan Wang,Shou-Chuan Shih,Yu-Jen Chen
Gastroenterology Research and Practice , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/814054
Abstract: Background. Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) accompanied with ascites formation causes several distressing symptoms, resulting in poor quality of life. Methods. Twenty BALB/c nude mice generated by direct orthotopic injection of human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells were randomized to receive either a stock laboratory diet or a stock diet supplemented with glutamine. Half of the mice were sacrificed at day 76 to measure the amount of ascitic fluid and pancreatic tumor volume. The remaining mice were subject to survival analysis. Serum albumin levels were estimated every 2 weeks. Results. At day 76, the average amount of ascitic fluid measured in the control group was ?mL compared to ?mL from the glutamine-supplemented mice ( ). The volume of pancreatic tumor was ?cm3 in the control group and ?cm3 in glutamine-supplemented mice ( ). The mean survival time of glutamine-supplemented mice was prolonged from to days ( ). Mean serum albumin levels were higher in the glutamine-supplemented group. Conclusions. This preclinical study showed that oral supplementation of glutamine may provide ascites-reducing activity in pancreatic cancer patients with PC, via a cell-mediated immunity-independent mechanism. 1. Introduction Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is well established as a terminal feature of advanced primary or secondary neoplasms involving the peritoneum. PC is a challenging complication associated with a poor prognosis and limited treatment options [1]. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer is one of the most common diseases causing PC and subsequent ascites formation. Terminal stage cancer patients with PC have an estimated median survival of 3–6 months [2]. At this terminal stage, quality of life, rather than the prolonging of survival, is considered the most crucial issue in palliative care. Nevertheless, the importance of life-prolonging palliative care is gaining recognition in the new era of cancer management. Because PC-associated ascites develops due to hydrostatic pressure factors rather than osmotic factors, the current management of the condition includes abdominal paracentesis, diuretics administration, and salt restriction. Nutrition support represents an alternative strategy to improve the general well-being after management for ascites. However, the value of nutrition support in patients with PC remains controversial with inconclusive survival benefits [3] and concerns that it may accelerate tumor growth [4, 5]. The pathogenesis of ascites formation in PC is unclear. It is thought to be a correlation between endothelial cells, angiogenesis, and
Abdominal irradiation modulates 5-Fluorouracil pharmacokinetics
Chen-Hsi Hsieh, Yen-Ju Hsieh, Chia-Yuan Liu, Hung-Chi Tai, Yu-Chuen Huang, Pei-Wei Shueng, Le-Jung Wu, Li-Ying Wang, Tung-Hu Tsai, Yu-Jen Chen
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-8-29
Abstract: The radiation dose distributions of cholangiocarcinoma patients were determined for the low dose areas, which are generously deposited around the intrahepatic target volume. Then, corresponding single-fraction radiation was delivered to the whole abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats from a linear accelerator after computerized tomography-based planning. 5-FU at 100 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation. A high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a UV detector was used to measure 5-FU in the blood. Ultrafiltration was used to measure protein-unbound 5-FU.Radiation at 2 Gy, simulating the daily human treatment dose, reduced the area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve (AUC) of 5-FU by 31.7% compared to non-irradiated controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in mean residence time and incremental total plasma clearance values, and volume of distribution at steady state. Intriguingly, low dose radiation at 0.5 Gy, representing a dose deposited in the generous, off-target area in clinical practice, resulted in a similar pharmacokinetic profile, with a 21.4% reduction in the AUC. This effect was independent of protein binding capacity.Abdominal irradiation appears to significantly modulate the systemic pharmacokinetics of 5-FU at both the dose level for target treatment and off-target areas. This unexpected and unwanted influence is worthy of further investigation and might need to be considered in clinical practice.Concurrent use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT) is becoming the standard treatment for various malignancies, especially locally advanced cancers. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the most commonly used and classical chemotherapeutic agents of CCRT. It is used as a neoadjuvant, definitive, or adjuvant treatment for cancers arising from the esophagus [1], biliary tract [2], pancreas [3], stomach [4], rectum [5], and bladder [6], in combination with RT.Pharmacokinetics is the study of a drug and/or its met
CYTOTOXIC CONSTITUENTS FROM THE ROOT WOOD OF FORMOSAN MICHELIA COMPRESSA
LIU,CHIA-YUAN; CHEN,YANG-WEN; CHENG,MING-JEN; LEE,SHOIW-JU; ABD EL-RAZEK,MOHAMED H; CHANG,WEN-HSIUNG; CHEN,YU-JEN; CHEN,IH-SHENG;
Journal of the Chilean Chemical Society , 2008, DOI: 10.4067/S0717-97072008000200017
Abstract: the methanolic extract of the root wood of michelia compressa (maxim.) sargent showed cytotoxicity against mcf-7, nci-h460 and sf-268 cancer cell lines. bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform-soluble layer led to the isolation of costunohde and liriodenine with cytotoxic activities, along with the isolation of twenty-seven known compounds. the active costunohde existed as major constituent in this study.
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