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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 74 matches for " CPH Myburgh "
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Exploring the needs and resources of children in a haematology-oncology unit
AE Oberholzer, E Nel, CPH Myburgh, M Poggenpoel
Health SA Gesondheid , 2011,
Abstract: Too often a child’s body is restored to health in the hospital, but the child is sent home with emotional wounds. This study explored the needs of children in a haematology-oncology unit as well as the resources that could be mobilised in order to address these needs by firstly carrying out a literature review. A field study was then conducted in order to prioritise the resources according to their importance for children in a haematology-oncology unit. A definite trend could be found in the way that the children responded to the request to prioritise the resources. The first three resources, as chosen by the children, all concerned the external social environment of the child. It could therefore be concluded that support from parents and other people of significance are most important to the child and should be taken into account when facilitating support for children in a haematology-oncology unit. It could also be concluded that these children do not experience sufficient control in their situation and it could therefore be suggested that children in a haematology-oncology unit should experience more control and power in their situation. So dikwels word ‘n kind se liggaam genees in die hospitaal, maar hierdie selfde kind gaan huis toe met emosionele wonde. Die behoeftes van kinders in ‘n hematologie-onkologie eenheid is ondersoek asook die hulpbronne wat gemobiliseer kan word om hierdie behoeftes aan te spreek deur gebruik te maak van ‘n literatuurstudie. Daarna is ‘n veldstudie gedoen om hierdie hulpbronne te prioritiseer volgens die belangrikheid daarvan vir kinders in ‘n hematologieonkologie eenheid. Die manier waarop die kinders die hulpbronne geprioritiseer het, het ‘n definitiewe tendens getoon. Die eerste drie hulpbronne wat deur die kinders gekies is, is al drie hulpbronne wat die eksterne sosiale omgewing van die kind behels. Die gevolgtrekking kan dus gemaak word dat die ondersteuning van ouers en ander persone wat belangrik is vir die kind, van uiterste belang is en in aanmerking geneem behoort te word in die fasilitering van ondersteuning van kinders in ‘n hematologie-onkologie eenheid. Die gevolgtrekking wat gemaak kan word is dat hierdie kinders nie genoeg beheer ervaar in hulle situasie nie en daarom word voorgestel dat kinders in ‘n hematologie-onkologie eenheid meer bemagtig behoort te word gegewe hulle omstandighede.
Report on onversea visit
M Poggenpoel,CPH Myburg
Health SA Gesondheid , 1998, DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v3i2.352
Abstract: Overseas visit to Canada and the USA from 14 February to 28 February 1998. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.
Norepinephrine: more of a neurohormone than a vasopressor
John Myburgh
Critical Care , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/cc9246
Abstract: In the previous issue of Critical Care, Hamzaoui and colleagues present an observational study on the haemodynamic effects of norepinephrine in septic patients with life-threatening hypotension [1]. Within 6 hours of admission to the intensive care unit, a threshold mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≤ 65 mmHg was selected to commence an infusion of norepinephrine, regardless of the degree of prior volume resuscitation. Measurements of cardiac index and derived indices of preload (end-diastolic global volume index) and stroke volume variation were made at baseline and following augmentation of MAP with norepinephrine. The patients were further categorised according to baseline left ventricular ejection fraction and whether they were able to achieve the target MAP. The investigators found that norepinephrine significantly increased MAP to a median value of 75 mmHg, which was associated with significant increases in cardiac output and indices of stroke volume and preload. This effect was consistent independent of baseline left ventricular ejection fraction - apart from those patients with left ventricular ejection fraction < 45%, who attained MAP > 75 mmHg. The authors concluded that the early administration of norepinephrine directed at achieving a target systemic perfusion pressure was achievable through parallel increases in cardiac output and preload.Although Hamzaoui and colleagues' study is observational and single-centred in a relatively small population of septic patients using derived indices from pulse contour analysis to quantify changes in preload and contractility [1], the results are consistent with physiological models that define the protean haemodynamic effects of endogenous catecholamines, specifically norepinephrine, under homeostatic and pathological conditions.Norepinephrine is the predominant endogenous sympathetic amine acting in all populations of adrenoreceptors [2]. There is a common misperception that this amine is predominantly an α-agonist. Nore
Editorial comments
Chris Myburgh
Health SA Gesondheid , 2008, DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v13i1.251
Abstract: The articles in this edition reflect the tradition of well-reasoned research promoted by Health SA Gesondheid. The articles cover a wide scope of demanding issues and range from investigations on the experiences of professional as well as non-professional participants on the provision of health care as a predictor of the turnover rate of professional nurses. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.
The evidence for small-volume resuscitation with hyperoncotic albumin in critical illness
John A Myburgh
Critical Care , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/cc6882
Abstract: Resuscitation of critically ill patients with hyperoncotic fluids offers a number of theoretical advantages. These are presented in the systemic review by Jacob and colleagues in this issue of Critical Care [1]. Based on the principles described by Starling in 1896 [2], intravenous administration of hyperoncotic fluids under physiological conditions produces transient hypervolemia that may be augmented by intravasation of interstitial fluid into the vascular compartment. This may result in increased effective intravascular volume that exceeds the volume of administered fluid and may reduce pathological interstitial edema. Under time-critical conditions such as traumatic brain injury, burns or severe sepsis, resuscitation with small volumes of hyperoncotic fluid appear attractive, particularly in the pre-hospital setting where prompt delivery of smaller volumes of resuscitation solutions may be more effectively administered.Hypertonic crystalloids, such as saline, have been advocated for small-volume resuscitation, particularly in the pre-hospital setting. However, a double-blind randomized-controlled trial comparing rapid infusion of 250 ml of 7.5% hypertonic saline to Ringer's lactate to patients with severe traumatic brain injury did not demonstrate a difference in mortality or six-month neurological outcomes [3].Of the hyperoncotic colloids, albumin has been used for resuscitation since the 1940s, primarily for acute resuscitation in hypovolemic patients, but also for 'slow' resuscitation in hypoalbuminemic patients with liver disease undergoing abdominal paracentesis. Despite limited evidence for the use of hyperoncotic albumin in these contexts, unequivocal evidence for the efficacy of iso-oncotic (4%) albumin for resuscitation of patients in the intensive care unit now exists following the publication of the Saline versus Albumin Fluid Evaluation (SAFE) study [4]. This study was prompted by the publication of a meta-analysis of 1,104 patients from 24 studies t
Community–groundwater compatibility assessments: An approach towards sustainable groundwater development
JA Myburgh, A Hugo
Water SA , 2012,
Abstract: To address water availability problems in a semi-arid country like South Africa, the National Water Act (RSA, 1998) proposes that specialists adopt an approach that is strategic, deliberate and dictated by socio-political reforms and socioeconomic development needs on a programmatic basis for long-term sustainability. To achieve this goal an approach is developed to determine community–groundwater compatibility as part of the initial stages of regional rural groundwaterdevelopment projects in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The steps followed in the community–groundwater compatibility assessment include: A desktop study where available literature is collected and reviewed. From this information and history, the sociopolitical challenges that will have to be faced for the successful completion of the groundwater-development project in the study area can often be established. This is valuable information to assist the hydrogeological team in planning the community–groundwater compatibility assessment, taking note of pitfalls and lessons learnt from previous approaches that might not always have been successful. A socio-economic characterisation includes setting up a contact database for the community authorities and technical managers within the study. The contact database includes all contact details of the ward councillors/technical managers as well as any relevant information or comments made by the ward councillor/technical manager during the conversation. All identified stakeholders must also be contacted, informing them of the project and study. The data obtained from the role-players are used to develop a social-character map. Site surveys and sampling are based on the social-character map. The study team assesses the knowledge communities carry concerning groundwater as well as their general attitude towards the use of groundwater. Data processing and analyses include the statistical processing of the collected data to assess the comprehensive measure of groundwater compatibility per area, and the individual indicators of the groundwater-compatibility index are given a relative score. This enables the different indicators for groundwater compatibility per area to be combined to give a single composite score for each spatial area. Target areas are finally characterised in terms of their ‘community–groundwater compatibility index’. Maps showing the social and basic hydrogeological character of target areas are valuable tools towards assisting local authorities in decision-making.
The Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia Society of South Africa (CASSA) consensus paper for accreditation of anaesthetists in South Africa in perioperative echocardiography
A Keene, A Myburgh
Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia , 2012,
Abstract: There is a need to develop an accreditation process for South African physicians who practise perioperative echocardiography. International level accreditation will bring legitimacy to the process of training practitioners in perioperative echocardiography and ensure standards of practice. Accreditation will be developed as a two-year process during which candidates with a College Fellowship or MMed degree may register with a supervisor and submit a portfolio of 120 comprehensive echo reports and five complete digital studies for assessment. If these are judged to be of an adequate standard, the candidate will be eligible to sit an exam consisting of a multiple-choice question theory and echo video paper and an oral exam.
Mountain bike racing - the influence of prior glycogen-inducing exercise and glutamine supplementation on selected stress and immune parameters
C Smith, KH Myburgh
South African Journal of Sports Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: Objective. To investigate the effect of pre-exercise glutamine supplementation and the influence of a prior acute bout of glycogen-reducing exercise on the general stress and immune response to acute high-intensity cycling. Design. Randomised, double-blind, cross-over supplementation study. Setting and intervention. Subjects performed a series of 4 simulated mountain-bike races lasting ≈60 minutes each on separate days 1 week apart, with/ without prior glycogen- reducing exercise on a known outdoor course with/ without pre-exercise glutamine supplementation. Blood samples were collected pre- and immediately post-exercise after each race. Main outcome measures. Circulating concentrations of cortisol (COR) and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate (DHEAS) were assessed at all time points, as well as changes in white blood cell (WBC) subpopulation distribution. Results. COR was elevated in all groups post-exercise (p < 0.0001), but neither glycogen reduction, nor glutamine supplementation had any effect. DHEAs increased post-exercise (p < 0.05), with a greater relative increase in glutamine-supplemented subjects (p = 0.07). Total WBC and neutrophil counts in all groups were elevated after exercise (both p < 0.0005). Glutamine supplementation had no effect on differential WBC counts or distribution, but total WBC (p = 0.06) and monocyte (p < 0.05) counts showed greater increases after glycogen reduction. Gluta- mine supplementation was associated with greater postexercise decreases in CD4+ count (p = 0.07) and CD4+: CD8+ ratio (p = 0.01) after glycogen-reducing exercise. Conclusions. We conclude that pre-exercise glutamine supplementation may have an anticortisol effect by enhancing the DHEAS response to exercise stress. The suppressive effect of glutamine supplementation on CD4+: CD8+ ratio and its positive effect on monocyte count after repeated bouts of exercise warrants further investigation. South African Journal of Sports Medicine Vol. 18 (4) 2006: pp. 122-128
Meta-synthesis on learners’ experience of aggression in secondary schools in South Africa
C Myburgh, M Poggenpoel
South African Journal of Education , 2009,
Abstract: This meta-synthesis is on research conducted by different researchers in a team research project on learners’ experience of aggression in secondary schools in South Africa. The objective was to obtain a broader understanding of their experience of aggression in different contexts in South Africa, as well as possible ways to assist learners to address the experienced aggression. Eleven completed research projects were purposively sampled. Data were collected utilising the following headings: objectives, sampling, research design, research method, and research results, and guidelines. At the end of the meta- synthesis process the results are described, with supporting direct quotations from participants and a literature control. Guidelines for learners to cope with aggression are described.
Meta-synthesis on learners' experience of aggression in secondary schools in South Africa
Chris Myburgh,Marie Poggenpoel
South African Journal of Education , 2009,
Abstract: This meta-synthesis is on research conducted by different researchers in a team research project on learners'experience of aggression in secondary schools in South Africa. The objective was to obtain a broader understanding of their experience of aggression in different contexts in South Africa, as well as possible ways to assist learners to address the experienced aggression. Eleven completed research projects were purposively sampled. Data were collected utilising the following headings: objectives, sampling, research design, research method, and research results, and guidelines. At the end of the meta-synthesis process the results are described, with supporting direct quotations from participants and a literature control. Guidelines for learners to cope with aggression are described.
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