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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 462204 matches for " C. F. D. "
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Home range of the Tropidurid lizard Liolaemus lutzae: sexual and body size differences
ROCHA, C. F. D.;
Revista Brasileira de Biologia , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0034-71081999000100016
Abstract: the home range of the tropidurid lizard liolaemus lutzae, an endemic species of the costal sand dune habitats of rio de janeiro state, was studied in the beach habitat of barra de maricá restinga, maricá county. home ranges were studied using a mark-recapture technique in a delimited area at the beach habitat. i considered for estimates and analysis the home ranges of those lizards with a minimum of four positions. the size of l. lutzae home ranges varied according to the segment of the population. the mean home range size of adult males (x = 59.8 ± 33.7 m2) was significantly larger than that of adult females (x = 22.3 ± 16.1 m2). juvenile mean home range size was significantly smaller than that of adult males, but did not differ from that of adult females (t = 1.058; p = 0.149). the overlap between male home ranges was usually low (3.6%), being in general only peripheral. conversely, there was a considerable overlap between home ranges of adult females with those of adult males, the home range areas of two or three females being enclosed in the home range of one adult male. the small overlap between home ranges of adult males suggested mutual exclusion. the observed between-sex differences in the size of l. lutzae home range may be explained by the sexual dimorphism in body size in this species, and by the need of adult males to establish larger areas so as to include many females in their areas, during the reproductive season. the differences in home range along ontogeny probably result from differences in body size of the different segments of the population, due to trophic differences (carnivory and herbivory levels), and the dispersal of young after birth. because l. lutzae is omnivorous, but primarily herbivorous when adult, and due to its sit-and-wait foraging behavior (mainly on arthropods), it does not need to move around over large areas to find food, which in turn reduces the area necessary for it to live.
Home range of the Tropidurid lizard Liolaemus lutzae: sexual and body size differences
ROCHA C. F. D.
Revista Brasileira de Biologia , 1999,
Abstract: The home range of the Tropidurid lizard Liolaemus lutzae, an endemic species of the costal sand dune habitats of Rio de Janeiro State, was studied in the beach habitat of Barra de Maricá restinga, Maricá County. Home ranges were studied using a mark-recapture technique in a delimited area at the beach habitat. I considered for estimates and analysis the home ranges of those lizards with a minimum of four positions. The size of L. lutzae home ranges varied according to the segment of the population. The mean home range size of adult males (x = 59.8 ± 33.7 m2) was significantly larger than that of adult females (x = 22.3 ± 16.1 m2). Juvenile mean home range size was significantly smaller than that of adult males, but did not differ from that of adult females (t = 1.058; p = 0.149). The overlap between male home ranges was usually low (3.6%), being in general only peripheral. Conversely, there was a considerable overlap between home ranges of adult females with those of adult males, the home range areas of two or three females being enclosed in the home range of one adult male. The small overlap between home ranges of adult males suggested mutual exclusion. The observed between-sex differences in the size of L. lutzae home range may be explained by the sexual dimorphism in body size in this species, and by the need of adult males to establish larger areas so as to include many females in their areas, during the reproductive season. The differences in home range along ontogeny probably result from differences in body size of the different segments of the population, due to trophic differences (carnivory and herbivory levels), and the dispersal of young after birth. Because L. lutzae is omnivorous, but primarily herbivorous when adult, and due to its sit-and-wait foraging behavior (mainly on arthropods), it does not need to move around over large areas to find food, which in turn reduces the area necessary for it to live.
Analytical Model of Landslide Risk Using GIS  [PDF]
Claudio F. Mahler, Erika Varanda, Luiz C. D. de Oliveira
Open Journal of Geology (OJG) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojg.2012.23018
Abstract: This paper presents a model for quantitative risk analysis with the application of geographic information systems (GISs) using Bayesian theory. It was used for the thematic integration of maps in a natural state (vegetation, geological-geo- technical, natural drainage and gradient). A landslide susceptibility map was produced based on this integration associated with vulnerability data (time and housing construction standards) and risk criteria. A quantitative risk map for a specific area was also drawn up from this data
Automated Service Management for Semantic IP Multimedia System [S-IMS]  [PDF]
Kidd S. C. Toh, S. M. F. D. Syed Mustapha
Communications and Network (CN) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/cn.2013.53025
Abstract:

Next Generation Network (NGN) has drawn great attention by the researchers and telecommunication industries as the future generation in the communication technologies and services. The interest covers all aspects on NGN from the global standards, architecture and services. The management of services provided in the NGN environment has posed great challenges due to the heterogeneity of the service protocols, service requirements and specifications and service functionalities. The research proposes enhancement of the automated service management through embedding the semantic service descriptions that can be referenced to the service ontology for service creation and management into the Next Generation Network, which will become Semantic Next Generation Network (SNGN).

The Role of a Novel Discrete-Time MRAC Based Motion Cueing on Loss of Control at a Hexapod Driving Simulator  [PDF]
B. Aykent, D. Paillot, F. Merienne, C. Guillet, A. Kemeny
Intelligent Control and Automation (ICA) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ica.2015.61010
Abstract: The objective of this paper is to present the advantages of Model reference adaptive control (MRAC) motion cueing algorithm against the classical motion cueing algorithm in terms of biomechanical reactions of the participants during the critical maneuvers like chicane in driving simulator real-time. This study proposes a method and an experimental validation to analyze the vestibular and neuromuscular dynamics responses of the drivers with respect to the type of the control used at the hexapod driving simulator. For each situation, the EMG (electromyography) data were registered from arm muscles of the drivers (flexor carpi radialis, brachioradialis). In addition, the roll velocity perception thresholds (RVT) and roll velocities (RV) were computed from the real-time vestibular level measurements from the drivers via a motion-tracking sensor. In order to process the data of the EMG and RVT, Pearson’s correlation and a two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 0.05 were assigned. Moreover, the relationships of arm muscle power and roll velocity with vehicle CG (center of gravity) lateral displacement were analyzed in order to assess the agility/alertness level of the drivers as well as the vehicle loss of control characteristics with a confidence interval of 95%. The results showed that the MRAC algorithm avoided the loss of adhesion, loss of control (LOA, LOC) more reasonably compared to the classical motion cueing algorithm. According to our findings, the LOA avoidance decreased the neuromuscular-visual cues level conflict with MRAC algorithm. It also revealed that the neuromuscular-vehicle dynamics conflict has influence on visuo-vestibular conflict; however, the visuo-vestibular cue conflict does not influence the neuromuscular-vehicle dynamics interactions.
Report on Acute Aortic Dissection Type A  [PDF]
C. Simoglou, F. Konstantinou, D. Mikroulis, S. Eleftheriadis, G. Bougioukas
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery (WJCS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/wjcs.2015.51001
Abstract: Background: Acute aortic dissection is a common life-threatening disorder affecting the aorta. The immediate mortality rate in aortic dissection is as high as 1% per hour over the first several hours, making early diagnosis and treatment critical for survival. Case presentation: We are presenting a case of Stanford Type A aortic dissection in a 58-year-old male patient with a history of hypertension. He arrived at the emergency department (ED) with diagnosed acute coronary syndrome a few hours after a sudden and severe worsening of his epigastric pain. Interesting case where the dissection starts from the orifice of the right coronary artery, occupies the aortic valve. Conclusion: Predictors of follow-up this cause mortality reflect patient history variables as opposed to in-hospital parameters or in-hospital complications, which may be explained by the successful in-hospital treatment of the acute dissection.
Quantum dissipative effects in moving mirrors: a functional approach
Fosco, C. D.;Lombardo, F. C.;Mazzitelli, F. D.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2007, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.76.085007
Abstract: We use a functional approach to study various aspects of the quantum effective dynamics of moving, planar, dispersive mirrors, coupled to scalar or Dirac fields, in different numbers of dimensions. We first compute the Euclidean effective action, and use it to derive the imaginary part of the `in-out' effective action. We also obtain, for the case of the real scalar field in 1+1 dimensions, the Schwinger-Keldysh effective action and a semiclassical Langevin equation that describes the motion of the mirror including noise and dissipative effects due to its coupling to the quantum fields.
Neumann Casimir effect: a singular boundary-interaction approach
C. D. Fosco,F. C. Lombardo,F. D. Mazzitelli
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2010.05.020
Abstract: Dirichlet boundary conditions on a surface can be imposed on a scalar field, by coupling it quadratically to a $\delta$-like potential, the strength of which tends to infinity. Neumann conditions, on the other hand, require the introduction of an even more singular term, which renders the reflection and transmission coefficients ill-defined because of UV divergences. We present a possible procedure to tame those divergences, by introducing a minimum length scale, related to the non-zero `width' of a {\em nonlocal} term. We then use this setup to reach (either exact or imperfect) Neumann conditions, by taking the appropriate limits. After defining meaningful reflection coefficients, we calculate the Casimir energies for flat parallel mirrors, presenting also the extension of the procedure to the case of arbitrary surfaces. Finally, we discuss briefly how to generalize the worldline approach to the nonlocal case, what is potentially useful in order to compute Casimir energies in theories containing nonlocal potentials; in particular, those which we use to reproduce Neumann boundary conditions.
Quantum dissipative effects in moving mirrors: a functional approach
C. D. Fosco,F. C. Lombardo,F. D. Mazzitelli
Physics , 2007, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.76.085007
Abstract: We use a functional approach to study various aspects of the quantum effective dynamics of moving, planar, dispersive mirrors, coupled to scalar or Dirac fields, in different numbers of dimensions. We first compute the Euclidean effective action, and use it to derive the imaginary part of the `in-out' effective action. We also obtain, for the case of the real scalar field in 1+1 dimensions, the Schwinger-Keldysh effective action and a semiclassical Langevin equation that describes the motion of the mirror including noise and dissipative effects due to its coupling to the quantum fields.
Casimir energies with finite-width mirrors
C. D. Fosco,F. C. Lombardo,F. D. Mazzitelli
Physics , 2008, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.77.085018
Abstract: We use a functional approach to the Casimir effect in order to evaluate the exact vacuum energy for a real scalar field in $d+1$ dimensions, in the presence of backgrounds that, in a particular limit, impose Dirichlet boundary conditions on one or two parallel surfaces. Outside of that limit, the background may be thought of as describing finite-width mirrors with frequency-dependent transmission and reflection coefficients. We provide new explicit results for the Casimir energy in some particular backgrounds
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